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Ben Nadler / Princeton University Press
Ben Nadler / Princeton University Press

Enjoy 17th Century Philosophy in Comic Book Form

Ben Nadler / Princeton University Press
Ben Nadler / Princeton University Press

Being a philosopher in the 17th century was a dangerous career choice. At odds with the Catholic church, Western philosophy found itself in a precarious position that would sometimes end in violence. For instance, Giordano Bruno—a philosopher who taught others that the Earth was not the center of the universe—was arrested and tried as a heretic and burned at the stake for his views.

That insult, heretic, became the title of a new graphic narrative that focuses on that era: Heretics! The Wondrous (and Dangerous) Beginnings of Modern Philosophy.

The comic book features the tales of various Western philosophers like Galileo, Isaac Newton, Baruch Spinoza, and John Locke, and breathes new illustrated life into them. Written by the father-son team Steven and Ben Nadler, the comic book aims to turn the trials of early scientific thought into a riveting graphic narrative.

With the help of colorful illustrations and jokes, the duo is able to make complicated philosophical ideas easier to digest for a larger group of readers as well as offer up plenty of drama.

The comic delves in Galileo's A Vigorous Defense of Copernicanism and Descartes's The World, among other works. Along with the breakdowns of various theories and ideas, there's also plenty of drama, schemes, and exciting triumphs.

You can pre-order the comic on Amazon and have it by June 20.

Heretics page 161

Heretics bowling

Heretics skiier

Heretics trippy

[h/t The Atlantic]

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Giulia van Pelt, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
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Comics
An Original Peanuts Comic Strip Can Be Yours—for $30,000
Giulia van Pelt, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Giulia van Pelt, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

An original Peanuts comic strip by famed cartoonist Charles Schulz could sell for as much as $30,000 at auction, according to estimates from Swann Auction Galleries. The New York City-based auction house will be selling this rare, signed comic strip at its Illustration Art sale on June 5.

A Peanuts comic strip
Swann Auction Galleries

The comic strip, which features characters Schroeder, Lucy, and Frieda, was originally published in 1970. Prior to the auction house acquiring the illustration, Schulz gave it to conductor Maurice Peress, who used it in a visual exhibition that accompanied the Kansas City Philharmonic's 1978 Beethoven Festival.

Diehard Peanuts fans will want to pay close attention to the ninth panel, which contains Schulz's signature. It's also inscribed with a message at the top reading, "Bill—Please save this one for me—Sparky." It's unclear who Bill might be, but Sparky was Schulz's nickname.

Two other Peanuts comic strips will also be up for grabs. A three-panel strip featuring Snoopy is expected to sell for as much as $12,000, while a longer strip showing Charlie Brown playing baseball as Snoopy begs for food could go for $25,000.

A Peanuts comic strip
Swann Auction Galleries

A Peanuts comic strip
Swann Auction Galleries

Other highlights of the auction include works by illustrator Edward Gorey, an original Russell H. Tandy cover illustration for a Nancy Drew novel, and various cover designs for New Yorker magazine.

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Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
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entertainment
Deadpool Fans Have a Wild Theory About Who Cable Really Is
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation

Deadpool 2 is officially in theaters and ruling the box office just like its predecessor did back in 2015. But this installment is about more than just crude jokes and over-the-top action scenes; it also includes the debut of a longtime Marvel character that fans have been clamoring to see on the big screen since 2000’s X-Men hit theaters: Cable.

But the Cable in Deadpool 2 isn’t quite the one fans have gotten used to in the books—for starters, his powers and backstory are reined in considerably. While it’s easy to assume that’s by design, so that audiences can better relate to the character (which is played by Josh Brolin), some fans have speculated that the changes are because, well, this character isn’t really Cable at all; instead, Screen Rant has a theory that this version of the character is actually none other than an older Wolverine from the future.

So how can Wolverine be Cable? Well, it’s actually quite easy, considering that Wolverine was Cable in Marvel’s Ultimate Universe comics, which was a series of books in the 2000s that completely reimagined the regular Marvel Universe. In this reality, a grizzled, aged Wolverine takes on the Cable nickname and travels back in time to prevent a takeover of Earth from the villain Apocalypse.

We were already introduced to Apocalypse in 2016’s X-Men: Apocalypse, and while he was defeated in the end, Screen Rant theorizes that he could return like he does in the Ultimate X-Men comics: by inhabiting the body of Nathaniel Essex, a.k.a. Mister Sinister. Essex was already name-dropped in Apocalypse and Deadpool 2, so it stands to reason that there might be some larger story on the horizon for him.

This would, of course, lead to more X-Men movies down the road, with Cable revealing his true nature and teaming with a crew of mutants that includes the classic X-Men cast as well as their younger selves to battle a newly formed Apocalypse. It’d also allow the character of Wolverine to live on in Brolin, leaving Hugh Jackman to enjoy a retired life without claws.

Obviously this is just one fan theory based on a comic storyline from over a decade ago. It would also have to ignore a whole host of continuity problems—including the events of Logan. But having a twist with Cable actually being Wolverine from the future (and likely from a different reality) is the type of headache-inducing madness the comics are known for.

[h/t: Screen Rant]

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