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Cool Job Alert: The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame is Hiring a Librarian

Are you a rock-loving library worker who dreams of ditching the wool cardigan for a leather jacket? Consider applying to The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame: As Atlas Obscura reports, the Cleveland, Ohio-based music museum is seeking a librarian to catalogue and develop library resources, promote public awareness of the collections, and represent the Hall of Fame to academic and library communities, among other duties.

Best known for its glitzy annual induction ceremony, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame also offers visitors live events, free history classes, and numerous special exhibits and permanent installations, filled with rock and roll-related artifacts. Its vast library houses everything from the standard books, journal articles, and audio/video recordings to archives containing a 1970 invitation to Janis Joplin’s wake, The 2 Live Crew Obscenity Trial Document, a brochure for the Woodstock Festival in 1969, and personal papers, photographs, and music posters galore.

Keep in mind that owning a sweet record collection doesn’t automatically make you qualified for the position. Applicants must have two or more years of experience cataloguing library resources—bonus points if they’ve catalogued music-related materials, or have experience working in a music library—and a master’s degree in library and/or information science. Also, an undergraduate and/or advanced degree in music or other relevant discipline is “strongly preferred.”

Interested in the position? Apply online. You can also take a virtual tour of the library below.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

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holidays
40 Years Later: Watch The Johnny Cash Christmas Show
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Over the course of his career, Johnny Cash made a series of Christmas TV specials and recorded a string of Christmas records. In this 1977 TV performance, Cash is in great form. He brings special guests Roy Clark, June Carter Cash, The Carter Family, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison ("Pretty Woman" starts around 23:50), Carl Perkins, and the Statler Brothers. Tune in for Christmas as we celebrated it 40 years ago—with gigantic shirt collars, wavy hair, and bow ties. So many bow ties.

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Pop Culture
An AI Program Wrote Harry Potter Fan Fiction—and the Results Are Hilarious
Andreas Rentz/Getty Images
Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

“The castle ground snarled with a wave of magically magnified wind.”

So begins the 13th chapter of the latest Harry Potter installment, a text called Harry Potter and the Portrait of What Looked Like a Large Pile of Ash. OK, so it’s not a J.K. Rowling original—it was written by artificial intelligence. As The Verge explains, the computer-science whizzes at Botnik Studios created this three-page work of fan fiction after training an algorithm on the text of all seven Harry Potter books.

The short chapter was made with the help of a predictive text algorithm designed to churn out phrases similar in style and content to what you’d find in one of the Harry Potter novels it "read." The story isn’t totally nonsensical, though. Twenty human editors chose which AI-generated suggestions to put into the chapter, wrangling the predictive text into a linear(ish) tale.

While magnified wind doesn’t seem so crazy for the Harry Potter universe, the text immediately takes a turn for the absurd after that first sentence. Ron starts doing a “frenzied tap dance,” and then he eats Hermione’s family. And that’s just on the first page. Harry and his friends spy on Death Eaters and tussle with Voldemort—all very spot-on Rowling plot points—but then Harry dips Hermione in hot sauce, and “several long pumpkins” fall out of Professor McGonagall.

Some parts are far more simplistic than Rowling would write them, but aren’t exactly wrong with regards to the Harry Potter universe. Like: “Magic: it was something Harry Potter thought was very good.” Indeed he does!

It ends with another bit of prose that’s not exactly Rowling’s style, but it’s certainly an accurate analysis of the main current that runs throughout all the Harry Potter books. It reads: “‘I’m Harry Potter,’ Harry began yelling. ‘The dark arts better be worried, oh boy!’”

Harry Potter isn’t the only work of fiction that Jamie Brew—a former head writer for ClickHole and the creator of Botnik’s predictive keyboard—and other Botnik writers have turned their attention to. Botnik has previously created AI-generated scripts for TV shows like The X-Files and Scrubs, among other ridiculous machine-written parodies.

To delve into all the magical fiction that Botnik users have dreamed up, follow the studio on Twitter.

[h/t The Verge]

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