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Norm Diamond, Daylight Books
Norm Diamond, Daylight Books

Photographer Explores the Quirky Scenes From Estate Sales

Norm Diamond, Daylight Books
Norm Diamond, Daylight Books

Estate sales are an interesting slice of American culture. They let you enter a home and leave with anything that's not bolted down—for the right price.

Photographer Norm Diamond is interested in the unusual nature of estate sales and has traveled all over the country visiting them and documenting his journey. His travels have shown him a whole array of knick-knacks and belongings that give some clues about the people who used to own them. The photographs are often humorous or sad, always touching on something very human and intimate.

You can find these photos in Diamond's new book published by Daylight Books, What Is Left Behind: Stories From Estate Sales. The book, which is currently available for pre-order, comes out May 16.

Tape Measure
Tape Measure

Empty Frame
Empty Frame

Cowboy Songs
Cowboy Songs

Everything Must Go
Everything Must Go

LBJ With Fishhooks
Everything Must Go

Man of the House
Man of the House

Marilyn Puzzle
Marilyn Puzzle

Off Limits
Off Limits

Playboy Collection
Playboy Collection

Sewing Table
Sewing Table

Stetsons and Old Spice
Stetsons and Old Spice

Thousands Pay Homage
Thousands Pay Homage

All images by Norm Diamond, courtesy of Daylight Books.

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Photographer's Amazing Snap of an Osprey Is Holding Two Big Surprises
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iStock

As a wildlife photographer, Doc Jon understands the importance of being in the right place at the right time. But it took getting home and really squinting at his own work to realize that he recently captured a “one-in-a-trillion shot” while taking a photo of an osprey in Madeira Beach, Florida. While demonstrating the power of his lens to a fellow beach-goer, Jon pointed his camera at an osprey flying about 400 feet above their heads, and snapped a quick photo.

“I started shooting and my settings were off,” Jon told Fstoppers. “I had no tripod. I was trying to hold it steady, but it was windy out," he said. "I could see the osprey had a fish, but it was far away. It wasn't until I got home, cropped in on it, lightened the shadows, and applied some sharpening that I suddenly saw. ‘Oh my god, that's a shark's tail.’ Then I saw the fish in its mouth and I knew it was going to go viral.”

Jon predicted correctly.

Photos courtesy of Doc Jon via Facebook

Jon’s photo, which has already been shared by thousands of people, features the osprey holding a shark, which is holding a fish—making it sort of like the photographic version of a turducken. News of Jon’s amazing photo spread after he posted it to his Facebook page and a local news station saw it. Since then, he told Fstoppers, he’s been receiving requests for interviews from as far away as Israel and India.

Of course, with all that exposure comes the inevitable question of authenticity. Fortunately, Jon is taking that part in stride.

"The fun part for me is some people are commenting that it's Photoshopped, and obviously, those people don't know the limitations of Photoshop," Jon told Fstoppers. "Then, other people are telling me I should have sold it instead of sharing it online. I'm laughing, because really, it's not a good photo. The photo itself kind of sucks. But it tells a great story and it's getting me a lot of recognition for my other work now."

[h/t: Fstoppers]

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Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
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Weather Watch
It's So Cold In One Part of Russia That People's Eyelashes Are Freezing
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

Oymyakon, a rural village in the eastern Russian region of Yakutia, is one of the coldest inhabited spots in the world. While some schools in the U.S. cancel classes as temperatures approach zero, schools in Oymyakon remain open in -40°F weather. But recently temperatures in the region have dropped too low even for seasoned locals to handle. As AP reports, the chill, which hit -88.6°F on January 16, is cold enough to break thermometers and freeze eyelashes.

Photos shared by residents on social media show the mercury in thermometers hovering at -70°F, the lowest temperature some are built to measure. When thermometers fail, people in Oymyakon have other ways of gauging the cold. Their uncovered eyelashes can freeze upon stepping outside. Hot water tossed in the air will also turn to snow before hitting the ground.

To Oymyakon's 500-odd citizens, the most recent cold snap is nothing out of the ordinary. Temperatures are perpetually below freezing there from late October to mid-May, and average temperatures for the winter months frequently reach −58 °F. On Tuesday, residents were advised to stay inside and stay as warm as possible. Of course, that directive wasn't enough to stop some adventurous locals from sneaking outside for selfies.

[h/t AP]

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