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Kenjamoto // CC BY 3.0
Kenjamoto // CC BY 3.0

Watch This "Impossible Object" Dovetail Cube Puzzle

Kenjamoto // CC BY 3.0
Kenjamoto // CC BY 3.0

This puzzle is devious. Externally, it looks like a cube with dovetails cut on four sides—which should be impossible. Dovetail joints are normally cut to join two planes to each other, like the front of a drawer with its side. It shouldn't be possible to cut dovetails across four interlocking planes...so how does this puzzle do it?

You can just skip ahead to the video below if you'd like a visual explanation—or I'll spoil it for you now. In short, the "impossible dovetail" relies on a hidden set of diagonal cuts that allow the puzzle to slide apart diagonally. There's often a pin or other fastening mechanism to prevent an accidental slide, making the joints appear firm and fast until you press it.

The logic of this puzzle plays on our assumptions about how dovetail joints work. Because these joints typically prevent motion in two planes, those are the planes we look at. Is it possible to pull the top off the puzzle? Nope! How about side-to-side? Impossible! By adding a dimension to the puzzle, the solution is revealed in that extra dimension as well—you've got to slide the pieces apart diagonally. The joints, of course, aren't impossible...it's our assumptions about how dovetail joints are cut that are incorrect.

In this video, "Mr. Puzzle" walks us through the solution to a wooden version of the puzzle (the solution starts at 1:52). Have a look:

If you're curious how this thing was made, here's a similar project by Clickspring, but machined out of aluminum. Behold:

If you'd like to make your own puzzle, free plans are online for a wooden version (requires a hand saw, coping saw, and chisel) as well as a plastic version (requires 3D printer).

(Image by Kenjamoto // CC BY 3.0.)

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TAKWest, Youtube
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Watch Boris Karloff's 1966 Coffee Commercial
TAKWest, Youtube
TAKWest, Youtube

Horror legend Boris Karloff is famous for playing mummies, mad scientists, and of course, Frankenstein’s creation. In 1930, Karloff cemented the modern image of the monster—with its rectangular forehead, bolted neck, and enormous boots (allegedly weighing in at 11 pounds each)—in the minds of audiences.

But the horror icon, who was born 130 years ago today, also had a sense of humor. The actor appeared in numerous comedies, and even famously played a Boris Karloff look-alike (who’s offended when he’s mistaken for Karloff) in the original Broadway production of Arsenic and Old Lace

In the ’60s, Karloff also put his comedic chops to work in a commercial for Butter-Nut Coffee. The strange commercial, set in a spooky mansion, plays out like a movie scene, in which Karloff and the viewer are co-stars. Subtitles on the bottom of the screen feed the viewer lines, and Karloff responds accordingly. 

Watch the commercial below to see the British star selling coffee—and read your lines aloud to feel like you’re “acting” alongside Karloff. 

[h/t: Retroist]

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iStock
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fun
Watch a Chain of Dominos Climb a Flight of Stairs
iStock
iStock

Dominos are made to fall down—it's what they do. But in the hands of 19-year-old professional domino artist Lily Hevesh, known as Hevesh5 on YouTube, the tiny plastic tiles can be arranged to fall up a flight of stairs in spectacular fashion.

The video spotted by Thrillist shows the chain reaction being set off at the top a staircase. The momentum travels to the bottom of the stairs and is then carried back up through a Rube Goldberg machine of balls, cups, dominos, and other toys spanning the steps. The contraption leads back up to the platform where it began, only to end with a basketball bouncing down the steps and toppling a wall of dominos below.

The domino art seems to flow effortlessly, but it took more than a few shots to get it right. The footage below shows the 32nd attempt at having all the elements come together in one, unbroken take. (You can catch the blooper at the end of an uncooperative basketball ruining a near-perfect run.)

Hevesh’s domino chains that don't appear to defy gravity are no less impressive. Check out this ambitious rainbow domino spiral that took her 25 hours to construct.

[h/t Thrillist]

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