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Watch an 8-Year-Old-Boy Break His Own Limbo Skating Record

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Limbo skating—not roller derby—might be the most extreme sport played on skates. Wheel-clad competitors zoom underneath a course of low-slung, horizontal obstacles, and to avoid touching them, they spread their legs apart (sometimes into a full split) and tilt their upper bodies close to the ground. If they graze the floor with their hands or forearms, they’re disqualified.

In the video below, shared by Laughing Squid, you can watch 8-year-old skating star Tiluck Keisam from Manipur, India set a new Guinness Record for “Farthest distance limbo skating under bars.” He zoomed 475 feet, 7 inches beneath poles set 2 1/2 feet above the floor.

Limbo skating is growing in popularity in India, but the record Keisam broke was his own: In December 2015, the pint-sized skater set his first limbo skating record when he cleared a distance of 380 feet, 5 inches, under bars set about 11 inches off the ground.

[h/t Laughing Squid]

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Don't Have Space For a Christmas Tree? Decorate a Pineapple Instead
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Christmas trees aren't for everyone. Some people can't fit a fir inside their cramped abodes, while others are turned off by the expense, or by the idea of bugs hitchhiking their way inside. Fake trees are always an option, but a new trend sweeping Instagram—pineapples as mini-Christmas "trees"—might convince you to forego the forest vibe for a more tropical aesthetic.

As Thrillist reports, the pineapple-as-Christmas-tree idea appears to have originated on Pinterest before it, uh, ripened into a social media sensation. Transforming a pineapple into a Halloween “pumpkin” requires carving and tea lights, but to make the fruit festive for Christmas all one needs are lights, ornaments, swaths of garland, and any other tiny tchotchkes that remind you of the holidays. The final result is a tabletop decoration that's equal parts Blue Hawaii and Miracle on 34th Street.

In need of some decorating inspiration? Check out a variety of “Christmas tree” pineapples below.

[h/t Thrillist]

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Kohske Takahashi, i-Perception (2017)
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Can You Figure Out This Newly Discovered Optical Illusion?
Kohske Takahashi, i-Perception (2017)
Kohske Takahashi, i-Perception (2017)

Ready to have your mind boggled? Take a look at the image above. What shape are the lines? Do they look like curves, or zigzags?

The image, spotted by Digg, is a new type of optical illusion published in the aptly named journal i-Perception. Discovered by Japanese psychologist Kohske Takahashi, it’s called the “curvature blindness illusion,” because—spoiler—the contrast of the lines against the gray background makes our eye see some of the lines as zigzags when, in fact, they’re all smooth curves.

The illusion relies on a few different factors, according to the three experiments Takahashi conducted. For it to work, the lines have to change contrast just at or after the peak of the curve, reversing the contrast against the background. You’ll notice that the zigzags only appear against the gray section of the background, and even against that gray background, not every line looks angled. The lines that look curvy change contrast midway between the peaks and the valleys of the line, whereas the lines that look like they contain sharp angles change contrast right at the peak and valley. The curve has to be relatively gentle, too.

Go ahead, stare at it for a while.

[h/t Digg]

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