CLOSE
Courtesy Other Criteria © Damien Hirst
Courtesy Other Criteria © Damien Hirst

Decorate Your Home With Damien Hirst Wallpaper

Courtesy Other Criteria © Damien Hirst
Courtesy Other Criteria © Damien Hirst

There’s a new way to show off your obsession with Damien Hirst: Line your walls with his work. The English artist just debuted a line of wallpaper through his retail store, Other Criteria. There are three repeating designs from which to choose.

One print, Entomology, is a version of Hirst’s 2009 work Nessus, a painting that features a kaleidoscopic view of colorful beetles and other insects. You know, just in case you want to live your life completely surrounded by bugs. (Beware: You might have some trouble spotting the actual insects inside your house.)

a kaleidoscope pattern of colorful insects radiating out in circles against a white background
Courtesy Other Criteria © Damien Hirst

Another, called Pharmacy 2, is an update of wallpaper that Hirst created for Pharmacy, the London restaurant he opened with Matthew Freud in 1997. (The original wallpaper is now held by the Victoria and Albert Museum.) The same wallpaper currently decorates the interiors of Pharmacy 2, their new restaurant located within a London gallery. “The wallpaper reflects Hirst’s enduring interest in the power of pharmaceuticals,” according to Other Criteria, and features a repeating grid of prescription drugs with brand names, generic names, and dosages listed underneath each illustration.

illustrations of colorful pills laid out in a grid with their names and doses underneath against a gray background
Courtesy Other Criteria © Damien Hirst

The third is a take on Hirst’s 2010 painting Valley of Death, a glossy image of brown, black, dark blue, and green butterfly wings. There are few motifs more Damien-Hirst-y than butterflies—he famously attached butterfly pupae to canvases and installed them in a gallery for his first solo show in 1991, allowing the insects to hatch and fly around the room feeding on sugar water and flowers during the exhibition.

dark brown collage of iridescent butterfly leaves
Courtesy Other Criteria © Damien Hirst

All the wallpapers are about $324 (£250) per 2.25-foot by 33-foot roll, which is pretty pricey for a wallpaper, but pretty cheap for a piece of art. Not that Hirst really needs your money. In 2013, he was named the wealthiest artist in the world.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Matt Cardy/Getty Images
arrow
pretty pictures
Check Out These Images of Last Night's Spectacular Harvest Moon
Matt Cardy/Getty Images
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Each year, a special moon comes calling around the autumnal equinox: the Harvest Moon. The Harvest Moon—the full moon that falls nearest to the equinox—rises near sunset for several days in a row, making early evenings extra-bright for a few days when farmers traditionally reveled in the extra-long twilight while harvesting their crops at the end of the summer season. And because the moon looks larger and more orange when it's near the horizon, it's particularly spectacular as it rises.

The Harvest Moon
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

October 5 marked 2017’s Harvest Moon, and you may have noticed an extra spectacular sky if you were looking up last night. It's rare for the Harvest Moon to come so late in the year: The last time it came in October was in 2009. (Last year's fell on September 16, 2016.) Here are a few luminous lunar pictures from the event, some of which make the moon look totally unreal:

And if you missed seeing the event yourself, don't worry too much: the moon will still look full for several days.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
arrow
pretty pictures
7 Throwback Photos of 1980s NYC Subway Graffiti

In May 1989, after a 15-year-long campaign of slowly eradicating New York City’s subway graffiti train-by-train, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority officially declared the city’s subways graffiti-free. There’s still subway graffiti in New York City today, but now it's confined to rail yards far away from the stations and tunnels. By the time the trains make it back onto the tracks, they’ve been cleaned of any markings.

There was a time, though, when graffiti artists had near-free rein to use the city’s subway trains as their canvases, as much as the transportation agency tried to stop them. A new book of photography, From the Platform 2: More NYC Subway Graffiti, 1983–1989, is an ode to that period.

A photo taken at night shows a subway train tagged "Cav."

Its authors, Paul and Kenny Cavalieri, are two brothers from the Bronx who began taking photos of subway trains in 1983, during the heyday of New York City's graffiti art era. They themselves were also graffiti artists who went by the names Cav and Key, respectively. (Above is an example of Cav's work from 1988, and below is an example of Key's.) Their book is a visual tribute to their youth, New York's graffiti culture, and their fellow artists.

For anyone who rides the New York City subway today, the images paint a whole different picture of the system. Let yourself be transported back to the '80s in some of these photos: 

A subway car bears tags by "Damps" and "Key."
Some of Kenny (Key) Cavalieri's work, circa 1987.

Graffiti on a subway car reads "Dero" in blue letters.

Blue letters tagged on the exterior of a subway car read “Comet.”

Pink and blue lettering reads “Bio” on the outside of a subway car.

A subway car reads “Pove” in green letters.

The book includes short commentaries and essays from other artists of the period remembering their experiences painting trains. It's a follow-up to Paul Cavalieri’s original 2011 collection From the Platform: Subway Graffiti, 1983-1989. He’s also the author of Under the Bridge: The East 238th Street Graffiti Hall Of Fame, a history of four decades of graffiti in the Bronx.

From the Platform 2 is $30 on Amazon.

[h/t The Guardian]

All images courtesy Paul and Kenny Cavalieri // Schiffer Publishing

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios