CLOSE
Original image
Anish Kapoor Descension, 2014 Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York, 2017
James Ewing, Public Art Fund, NY // © Anish Kapoor, 2017

Never-Ending Whirlpool Mesmerizes Visitors at Brooklyn Bridge Park

Original image
Anish Kapoor Descension, 2014 Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York, 2017
James Ewing, Public Art Fund, NY // © Anish Kapoor, 2017

Visitors will have trouble tearing their eyes away from the newest art installation to grace Brooklyn Bridge Park in New York City. As designboom reports, the waters of Anish Kapoor’s "Descension" appear to swirl forever into a bottomless vortex.

The whirlpool was commissioned by Public Art Fund in celebration of the nonprofit’s 40th anniversary. British artist Kapoor presented his concept at India’s Kochi-Muziris Biennale, Galleria Continua in San Gimignanom, and a solo show at Versailles before bringing it to Brooklyn. Public Art Fund describes the installation as “the result of intensive research into material and process, exploring the potential of water to behave in surprising ways. The continuous swirling motion of this 26-foot-diameter liquid mass converges in a central vortex, as if rushing water is being sucked into the earth’s depths.”

Parkgoers have until September 10 to stare into the whirlpool in person.

Whirlpool art installation mesmerizes visitors to Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Whirlpool art installation mesmerizes visitors to Brooklyn Bridge Park.

[h/t designboom]

Original image
Anish Kapoor Descension, 2014 Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York, 2017
Matt Cardy/Getty Images
arrow
pretty pictures
Check Out These Images of Last Night's Spectacular Harvest Moon
Original image
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Each year, a special moon comes calling around the autumnal equinox: the Harvest Moon. The Harvest Moon—the full moon that falls nearest to the equinox—rises near sunset for several days in a row, making early evenings extra-bright for a few days when farmers traditionally reveled in the extra-long twilight while harvesting their crops at the end of the summer season. And because the moon looks larger and more orange when it's near the horizon, it's particularly spectacular as it rises.

The Harvest Moon
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

October 5 marked 2017’s Harvest Moon, and you may have noticed an extra spectacular sky if you were looking up last night. It's rare for the Harvest Moon to come so late in the year: The last time it came in October was in 2009. (Last year's fell on September 16, 2016.) Here are a few luminous lunar pictures from the event, some of which make the moon look totally unreal:

And if you missed seeing the event yourself, don't worry too much: the moon will still look full for several days.

Original image
Anish Kapoor Descension, 2014 Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York, 2017
arrow
pretty pictures
7 Throwback Photos of 1980s NYC Subway Graffiti
Original image

In May 1989, after a 15-year-long campaign of slowly eradicating New York City’s subway graffiti train-by-train, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority officially declared the city’s subways graffiti-free. There’s still subway graffiti in New York City today, but now it's confined to rail yards far away from the stations and tunnels. By the time the trains make it back onto the tracks, they’ve been cleaned of any markings.

There was a time, though, when graffiti artists had near-free rein to use the city’s subway trains as their canvases, as much as the transportation agency tried to stop them. A new book of photography, From the Platform 2: More NYC Subway Graffiti, 1983–1989, is an ode to that period.

A photo taken at night shows a subway train tagged "Cav."

Its authors, Paul and Kenny Cavalieri, are two brothers from the Bronx who began taking photos of subway trains in 1983, during the heyday of New York City's graffiti art era. They themselves were also graffiti artists who went by the names Cav and Key, respectively. (Above is an example of Cav's work from 1988, and below is an example of Key's.) Their book is a visual tribute to their youth, New York's graffiti culture, and their fellow artists.

For anyone who rides the New York City subway today, the images paint a whole different picture of the system. Let yourself be transported back to the '80s in some of these photos: 

A subway car bears tags by "Damps" and "Key."
Some of Kenny (Key) Cavalieri's work, circa 1987.

Graffiti on a subway car reads "Dero" in blue letters.

Blue letters tagged on the exterior of a subway car read “Comet.”

Pink and blue lettering reads “Bio” on the outside of a subway car.

A subway car reads “Pove” in green letters.

The book includes short commentaries and essays from other artists of the period remembering their experiences painting trains. It's a follow-up to Paul Cavalieri’s original 2011 collection From the Platform: Subway Graffiti, 1983-1989. He’s also the author of Under the Bridge: The East 238th Street Graffiti Hall Of Fame, a history of four decades of graffiti in the Bronx.

From the Platform 2 is $30 on Amazon.

[h/t The Guardian]

All images courtesy Paul and Kenny Cavalieri // Schiffer Publishing

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios