CLOSE

Does the Thunderstorm "Bubble" Really Exist?

Have you ever watched a promising thunderstorm barrel toward you, only to see it fall apart or shift course at the last second? It can be frustrating to expect the cooling relief of a nice deluge—only to be left high and dry as you watch the dark clouds fade away on the horizon.

It’s common to describe this phenomenon as a “bubble,” a perceived forcefield hovering over your town that seems to deflect storms when you want them the most. There’s even an XKCD comic about it. Of course, those mythical deflectors don’t exist, but why do storms seem to consistently hit certain areas, while often skipping nearby towns?

Some local features, like large, cool bodies of water or tall mountains, really can affect how thunderstorms behave. But for the most part, a storm suddenly missing one location is mostly the result of how these bubbling masses of air and moisture evolve throughout their short lifecycle.

There are three common types of thunderstorms—single-cell, multicell (think squall lines), and supercells. The latter two categories are commonly associated with organized severe weather outbreaks. By far the most common type of thunderstorm around the world is a single-cell. This is a small, localized burst of convection often called a pop-up, popcorn, or garden-variety thunderstorm.

If there isn’t a focus point for thunderstorms to develop—something like a cold front or a sea breeze—the exact location where one of these warm weather torrents develops is usually pretty random. A storm will pop up, produce lots of lightning and heavy rain for a little while, and then start to dissipate. The cold air rushing away from the decaying storm will serve as a focus for more thunderstorms to develop nearby. Whether or not you get hit by an approaching thunderstorm depends on how healthy it is, and if any other storms form in its wake. In other words, if a storm falls apart a block away from you, it’s usually a stroke of atmospheric luck.

If you average out precipitation trends over a long period of time, the data show that rainfall is pretty evenly distributed between neighboring communities. One storm could miss you and hit the town next door, while the storm that hits you missed your neighbors down the street. It balances out with time.

However, there are some cases where certain towns benefit from their surroundings when a thunderstorm is on its way. Thunderstorms can start to weaken as they approach more stable air near cool bodies of water like the Atlantic Ocean or the Great Lakes. There is also some truth that mountains are less conducive to storms, as the rough terrain and cooler temperatures can disrupt the updraft and temporarily weaken storms as they traverse the terrain. That certainly isn’t always the case, though—there are plenty of rocking storms along the coast and in the mountains every season.

So for the most part, if a thunderstorm looks like it’s coming straight for you and then disappears into thin air, it has less to do with where you live and more to do with the fragile, fluid structure of these magnificent natural formations.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Weather Watch
New Contest Will Give Kids the Chance to Become Weather Channel Meteorologists for a Day
iStock
iStock

Not every kid dreams of being an on-air meteorologist, but for young ‘uns obsessed with storm forecasts and local weather reports, a new contest presents a unique opportunity to live out their dreams. The Mini Meteorologist Contest, sponsored by Lands’ End, will give four kids a chance to present a weather report on The Weather Channel this summer.

The nationwide contest is open to future meteorologists in the U.S. and Canada ages 6 to 16. To enter, they just have to write an essay between 50 and 500 words long on why they love learning about science and weather and why they’d like to be a meteorologist for a day. Four winners will receive a trip for them and their parents to The Weather Channel’s headquarters in Atlanta. They’ll have the opportunity to report the weather for the show on July 12, which happens to be National Summer Learning Day.

The essays will be judged based in equal parts on creativity, grammar, and the entrant’s love of meteorology. The only rules for the essays are that they can’t mention any products or brands other than Lands’ End or The Weather Channel (so no essays about how L.L. Bean inspired your love of cloud formations, kids) and has to be the child’s original work. Kids who are chosen as semi-finalists will have their on-air presentation skills judged in a Skype interview.

Should they win, they’ll get an inclusive trip to Atlanta with media training, a tour of The Weather Channel headquarters, and a $500 Lands’ End gift card to get just the right weather-reporting wardrobe.

The deadline for entering is May 21. Essays can be submitted here.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Weather Watch
Thanks to Desert Dust, Eastern Europe Is Covered in Orange Snow
iStock
iStock

Certain areas of Eastern Europe are starting to look a bit like Mars. Over the last few days, snowy places like Sochi, Russia have experienced an unusual snowfall that coated mountains in orange powder, according to the BBC.

The orange snow was the result of winds blowing sand from the Sahara east to places like Moldova, Romania, Bulgaria, Ukraine, and Russia. The sand mixes with precipitation to form orange-tinted snow. According to the BBC, the phenomenon occurs semi-regularly, turning snow orange about once every five years, but this year is especially sandy. As a result, skiers are navigating slopes that look like they're from a different world, as you can see in the video below from The Guardian.

The Sahara rarely gets snow, but when it does, the landscape can look somewhat similar, as you can see in this image of the Atlas mountains in Morocco.

Instagram is currently filled with photos and videos from Eastern Europe featuring the odd-looking snow. Check out a few samples below.

[h/t BBC]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios