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Screenshot via Internet Archive

You Can Download 200 Art Books Free From the Guggenheim

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Screenshot via Internet Archive

Too stingy for expensive art books? The Guggenheim has you covered. Since 2012, the museum has been slowly digitizing its collection of monographs, catalogs, and other art books. Now, it's up to 205 books, all available to download for free from the Internet Archive, as Vice's Creators reports.

Roy Lichtenstein's Preparedness
American Pop Icons // Guggenheim Museum

The collection includes books by legendary artists like Wassily Kandinsky, analyses of artistic movements like Futurism and German Expressionism, and monographs on everyone from Jenny Holzer to Picasso.

spread from Picasso and the War Years with a crayon sketch on the left and an oil painting on the right, both of Cubist women
Picasso and the War Years: 1937-1945 // Guggenheim Museum

Seriously, if you want to know anything about Kandinsky, the Guggenheim’s digitized collection is the place to go—there are 12 works in the digitized archive that are either by or about the Russian abstract artist. (The museum has one of the largest collections of Kandinsky’s works in the world, via the personal collection of Solomon R. Guggenheim himself.)

book spread of two Kandinksy works, Red Oval and In the Black Square
Kandinsky // Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim isn’t the only museum making its archives more accessible online. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has hundreds of its own books available online. The Getty’s virtual library launched in 2014 with 250 titles published by the museum, the Getty Conservation Institute, and the Getty Research Institute.

[h/t Creators]

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Hamilton Broadway
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Food
A Hamilton-Themed Cookbook is Coming
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Hamilton Broadway

Fans of Broadway hit Hamilton will soon be able to dine like the Founding Fathers: As Eater reports, a new Alexander Hamilton-inspired cookbook is slated for release in fall 2017.

Cover art for Laura Kumin's forthcoming cookbook
Amazon

Called The Hamilton Cookbook: Cooking, Eating, and Entertaining in Hamilton’s World, the recipe collection by author Laura Kumin “takes you into Hamilton’s home and to his table, with historical information, recipes, and tips on how you can prepare food and serve the food that our founding fathers enjoyed in their day,” according to the Amazon description. It also recounts Hamilton’s favorite dishes, how he enjoyed them, and which ingredients were used.

Recipes included are cauliflower florets two ways, fried sausages and apples, gingerbread cake, and apple pie. (Cue the "young, scrappy, and hungry" references.) The cookbook’s official release is on November 21—but until then, you can stave off your appetite for all things Hamilton-related by downloading the musical’s new app.

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fun
Never Buy Drawing Paper Again With This Endlessly Reusable Art Notebook
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Art supplies can get pricey when you’re letting your kid’s creativity run wild. But with an endlessly reusable notebook, you never have to worry about running out of paper during that after-school coloring session.

The creators of the erasable Rocketbook Wave have come out with a new version of their signature product meant especially for color drawings. The connected Rocketbook Color notebook allows you to send images drawn on its pages to Google Drive or other cloud services with your phone, then erase the pages by sticking the whole notebook in the microwave. You get a digital copy of your work (one that, with more vibrant colors, might look even better than the original) and get to go on drawing almost immediately after you fill the book.

An animated view of a notebook’s pages changing between different drawings.

There’s no special equipment involved beyond the notebook itself. The Rocketbook Color works with Crayola and other brands’ washable crayons and colored pencils, plus dry-erase markers. The pages are designed to be smudge-proof, so turning the page won’t ruin the art on the other side even if you are using dry-erase markers.

Rocketbook’s marketing is aimed at kids, but adults like to save paper, too. Break away from the adult coloring books and go free-form. If it doesn’t quite work out, you can just erase it forever.

The notebooks are $20 each on Kickstarter.

All images courtesy Rocketbook

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