CLOSE
HoleRoll
HoleRoll

Cut-Out Curtain Design Fills Your Window With a Starry City Skyline

HoleRoll
HoleRoll

Whether your window faces a forest, a highway, or a brick wall, the Ukrainian designers at HoleRoll have found a way to give your bedroom a world-class view. As My Modern Met reports, they’ve re-imagined traditional black-out blinds to display dazzling cityscapes.

What look like squares of white paint are actually tiny holes carefully cut from the black panels. During the day, light filters through the fabric to bring the skylines of New York and London to life. That way you can enjoy the bright lights of the big city without all the noise and congestion that comes with it.

Blackout curtains depict a city skyline during the day.
Holeroll

Blackout curtains depict a city skyline during the day.
Holeroll

Blackout curtains depict a city skyline during the day.
Holeroll

[h/t My Modern Met]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
arrow
Weather Watch
It's So Cold In One Part of Russia That People's Eyelashes Are Freezing
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

Oymyakon, a rural village in the eastern Russian region of Yakutia, is one of the coldest inhabited spots in the world. While some schools in the U.S. cancel classes as temperatures approach zero, schools in Oymyakon remain open in -40°F weather. But recently temperatures in the region have dropped too low even for seasoned locals to handle. As AP reports, the chill, which hit -88.6°F on January 16, is cold enough to break thermometers and freeze eyelashes.

Photos shared by residents on social media show the mercury in thermometers hovering at -70°F, the lowest temperature some are built to measure. When thermometers fail, people in Oymyakon have other ways of gauging the cold. Their uncovered eyelashes can freeze upon stepping outside. Hot water tossed in the air will also turn to snow before hitting the ground.

To Oymyakon's 500-odd citizens, the most recent cold snap is nothing out of the ordinary. Temperatures are perpetually below freezing there from late October to mid-May, and average temperatures for the winter months frequently reach −58 °F. On Tuesday, residents were advised to stay inside and stay as warm as possible. Of course, that directive wasn't enough to stop some adventurous locals from sneaking outside for selfies.

[h/t AP]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
travel
Even in Real Time, the Northern Lights Look Like a Beautiful Timelapse Video
iStock
iStock

Nothing compares to seeing the Northern Lights in person, but this video shared by The Kid Should See This is a pretty decent substitute. Though it may look like a timelapse, the footage hasn’t been altered or sped up at all. The undulating green lights you see below are what the aurora borealis looks like in real time.

Astro-photographer Kwon O Chul captured the footage of the meteorological phenomenon in Canada’s Northwest Territories in March 2013. The setting, the Aurora Village in Yellowknife, is a popular destination for tourists coming to see the Northern Lights up close. In the video, you can see how the camp’s glowing teepees complement the colorful ribbon of lights above.

Even if you plan your Northern Lights sightseeing trip perfectly, it’s impossible to guarantee that you’ll get a clear view of the aurora borealis on any given night, since factors like solar activity and weather conditions affect the light show’s visibility. But if you want to know what to expect when the lights are at their peak, take a look at the clip below.

You can check out more of Kwon O Chul's photography on Facebook.

[h/t The Kid Should See This]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios