Uber’s Flying Taxis Could Hit the Skies as Soon as 2020

Uber
Uber

In October 2016, Uber released an outline of the company's plan to have flying taxis ferrying passengers through the skies within a decade. Six months later, at the Uber Elevate Summit in Dallas, Texas held in last month, chief product officer Jeff Holden revealed that the project could be taking off even sooner than that. As Reuters reports, the ride-hailing service hopes to have its vehicles in the air over Dubai and the Dallas-Fort Worth area by 2020.

The vertical takeoff and landing aircrafts (VTOLs) will be able to discreetly travel between rooftop landing pads around the cities. They’ll run on electricity, making them clean, quiet, and cheap. Uber expects fares to start at $1.32 per passenger mile, which falls between the prices for an Uber X ($0.85 per mile) and an Uber XL ($1.35 per mile) in Dallas-Fort Worth.

The company's plan is to eventually make using the service less expensive than owning a car. It also promises to be convenient: According to Uber’s estimates, a two-hour car trip from San Francisco’s Marina to downtown San Jose would take 15 minutes by VTOL. The taxis will be flown by certified human pilots at first, but Uber hopes to eventually replace those pilots with autonomous flying technology.

Construction on the VTOL landing hubs will begin in Dallas in 2018. The company is also working with Dubai to get the craft airborne in time for the city’s World Expo in 2020. If everything goes according to plan, the taxis should be giving commercial rides by 2023.

[h/t Reuters]

Tesla Drivers Now Have Access to a Library of Fart Sounds in Their Car

Spencer Platt, Getty Images
Spencer Platt, Getty Images

Tesla’s latest software update includes more than just a few technical tweaks. It also turns the electric vehicles into on-demand fart machines, according to Inverse.

Tesla’s Emissions Testing Mode lets drivers choose different fart sounds from the car’s touchscreen, giving electric-car owners a good sense of Elon Musk’s sense of toilet humor. There’s “Short Shorts Ripper,” “Falcon Heavy,” Ludicrous Fart,” Neurastink,” “Boring Fart,” and “Not a Fart,” all of which are named after some Musky in-joke. (The last one is a play on the Boring Company’s Not a Flamethrower.) Should drivers find it impossible to choose between all the sound effects, the “I’m so random” will shuffle through them automatically.

Users can program the fart sounds to play when a turn signal is activated or when the driver touches the left-side steering scroll wheel. You can see/hear it in action in a Tesla Model S here.

Farting functionality isn’t the only whimsical edition to the software. At this point, Tesla's in-car software comes with a variety of Easter eggs for users to unlock, including games, special lighting effects, and more. In addition to all the flatulence, this update includes a Romance Mode that brings up video of a cozy, crackling fire on the central console and prompts the car to blast the heat and turn on some sensual tunes.

[h/t Inverse]

Warning: Don't Fall for the New Netflix Phishing Scam Going Around

iStock.com/wutwhanfoto
iStock.com/wutwhanfoto

In addition to catching up on Stranger Things and kicking ex-roommates off your account, you now have something else to worry about if you're a Netflix user. As WYFF 4 reports, there's a phishing scam circulating through email that targets subscribers to the streaming service.

The email is formatted to look like an official message from Netflix, with the company's logo at the top. It informs you that "your account is on hold," and that you need to update your payment information before service can resume.

But law officials are warning web users not to click the link in the email, or in any emails that come from unfamiliar sources. "Criminals want you to click the links, so that you voluntarily give your personal identifying information away. It is very successful," the Solon, Ohio police department shared in a Facebook post. "Don't click the links. The links could also be a way to install malware on your computer."

The phishing email contains a few clues that it's not legitimate: It lists an international phone number, uses the British spelling of centre, and opens with the unusual greeting "Hi Dear."

But even without these giveaways, you should always be wary of emails that ask for personal information, even if they appear to come from companies that you trust. According to Netflix, communications emails will always come from the address info@mailer.netflix.com. If you receive a message from this address (or an address that looks like it), and aren't sure if it's trustworthy, you can always go to Netflix and reach out to customer service about the problem directly.

[h/t WYFF 4]

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