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How That 10 Concerts Meme Makes You Vulnerable to Hackers

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Whether you braved a stadium full of screaming fans to see Justin Timberlake or got elbowed in the face during a Green Day show, few memories are as lasting as your first concert experience. But even though it's fun to remember (or let's face it, make fun of) the bands you saw live as a kid or teen, you should probably avoid reminiscing about them on Facebook if you don’t want to fall vulnerable to hackers, USA Today points out.

If you've been on social media in the past week, you’ve probably seen the popular "10 concerts" meme, in which Facebook users list 10 music shows: nine they've actually attended, and one that they didn't. As their friends puzzle out which of these shows is the fake one, the guessing game often turns into a walk down memory lane as everyone shares their own unforgettable performances. Sometimes, participants also pair their lists with notes in which they recall their first or favorite concerts.

Your first concert doesn't need to be a closely guarded secret (unless it really is that humiliating), but you shouldn't ever reveal it online: As you may recall, it's the answer to a common security question—"What was your first concert?"—used by banks and other institutions to prevent digital intruders from accessing your accounts.

"If I'm a hacker, I'm taking full advantage of this," Fatemeh Khatibloo, an analyst with Forrester Research, told USA Today. "Don't make those kinds of answers about your life public."

If you’ve participated in the "10 concerts" meme, consider deleting your post, or only sharing it with a few trustworthy friends. That said, going forward, it's a good idea to re-think the way you answer these types of security questions. In addition to the first band you saw live, other questions ask for easily searchable info, including your mother’s maiden name and the name of the street you grew up on. Protect yourself by answering with lies—example, say your mom’s maiden name is Dumbledore, or you were raised on Diagon Alley—or to be extra-safe, use a a password manager to generate a random string of numbers, letters, and symbols to use as your password.

[h/t USA Today]

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Stop Your Snoring and Track Your Sleep With a Wi-Fi Smart Pillow
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REM-Fit

Everyone could use a better night's rest. The CDC says that only 66 percent of American adults get as much sleep as they should, so if you're spending plenty of time in bed but mostly tossing and turning (or trying to block out your partner's snores), it may be time to smarten up your sleep accessories. As TechCrunch reports, the ZEEQ Smart Pillow improves your sleeping schedule in a multitude of ways, whether you're looking to quiet your snores or need a soothing lullaby to rock you to sleep.

After a successful Kickstarter in 2016, the product is now on sale and ready to get you snoozing. If you're a snorer, the pillow has a microphone designed to listen to the sound of your snores and softly vibrate so that you shift positions to a quieter pose. Accelerometers in the pillow let the sleep tracker know how much you're moving around at night, allowing it to record your sleep stages. Then, you can hook the pillow up to your Amazon Echo or Google Home so that you can have your favorite smart assistant read out the pillow's analysis of your sleep quality and snoring levels the next morning.

The pillow is also equipped with eight different wireless speakers that turn it into an extra-personal musical experience. You can listen to soothing music while you fall asleep, either connecting the pillow to your Spotify or Apple Music account on your phone via Bluetooth or using the built-in relaxation programs. You can even use it to listen to podcasts without disturbing your partner. You can set a timer to turn the music off after a certain period so you don't wake up in the middle of the night still listening to Serial.

And when it's time to wake up, the pillow will analyze your movements to wake you during your lightest sleep stage, again keeping the noise of an alarm from disturbing your partner.

The downside? Suddenly your pillow is just another device with a battery that needs to charge. And forget about using it in a place without Wi-Fi.

The ZEEQ Smart Pillow currently costs $200.

[h/t TechCrunch]

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Learn to Tie a Tie in Less Than 2 Minutes
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For most men—and Avril Lavigne-imitators—learning to tie a tie is an essential sartorial skill. Digg spotted this video showing how you can tie one the simple way, with a tabletop method that works just as well if you’re going to wear the tie yourself or if you're tying it together for someone else who doesn't share your skills.

The whole technique is definitely easier to master while watching the video below, but here's a short rundown: As laid out by the lifehack YouTube channel DaveHax, the method requires you to lay the tie out on a table, folded in half as if you're about to loop it around your neck.

With the back of the tie facing up, you loop over each end, then twist the thinner of the two loops around itself so it ends up looking like a mini-tie knot itself. You'll end up nestling the two loops together and snaking the thin tail of the tie through the whole thing. Then, essentially all you have to do is pull, and you can adjust the tie as you otherwise would to put it over your head.

Unfortunately, this won't teach you how to master the art of more complicated neckwear styles like the fancier Balthus knot or even a bow tie, but it's a pretty good start for those who have yet to figure out even the simplest tie fashions.

[h/t Digg]

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