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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images
Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Most of the U.S. Is Experiencing Record-Low Drought Levels

Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images
Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

This winter, relentlessly wet weather patterns bathed the United States with much-needed water. As a result, drought levels in the United States are at their lowest since Y2K, according to an analysis released by the United States Drought Monitor (USDM). Only 5.4 percent of the country is experiencing drought conditions right now, the lowest level on record since the USDM began a weekly analysis of abnormally dry conditions on January 4, 2000.

The USDM’s job is to measure the severity of a region’s dryness based on data like observed rainfall, soil moisture, streamflow, and water levels in lakes and reservoirs. This precipitation data is categorized on a five-point scale that ranges from “abnormal dryness,” the lowest category, to “exceptional drought”—reserved for the worst and longest-lasting drought conditions.

About 12 percent of the country is experiencing “abnormally dry” conditions, usually indicative of fleeting dryness that can often be remedied with a decent afternoon of soaking rain. The regions still thirsting for water are mostly in the southeastern United States, where widespread severe drought conditions persist over central and southern parts of Florida. The worst drought conditions exist there and over the mountains of northern Georgia, a tiny area that’s seen a rainfall deficit of 8 to 12 inches since last fall. But drought conditions across the rest of the country are largely scattered and limited in both scope and duration.

A major contributing factor to these delightfully low drought levels is California’s incredible reversal in fortunes this past winter. The state endured a devastating, years-long drought that abruptly came to an end after a steady train of storms rolled ashore and produced copious amounts of rain and snow. Much of central and northern parts of California have seen rainfall amounts of 1 to 2 feet above normal over the past six months. The Sierra Nevada mountain range in particular has seen more than 100 inches of snow this season, erasing previous years’ snowfall deficits and building up a significant reserve of meltwater to replenish downstream reservoirs when the warmth of summer takes hold.

Ironically, areas that were too dry not too long ago are now trying to cope with too much rainfall. North Carolina was hit especially hard toward the end of April, when a slow-moving storm system dropped more than 6 inches of rain across some of the most populated parts of the state. The heavy, steady rain mostly erased the state’s rainfall deficit in one weekend, but it also caused some major flooding problems. Raleigh, North Carolina, for example, found itself in a “flash flood emergency” on April 25, 2017, after excessive rains swelled local waterways beyond their banks and threatened homes, businesses, and major thoroughfares. When it comes to rain, as with everything in life, moderation is the goal.

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Weather Watch
New Contest Will Give Kids the Chance to Become Weather Channel Meteorologists for a Day
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Not every kid dreams of being an on-air meteorologist, but for young ‘uns obsessed with storm forecasts and local weather reports, a new contest presents a unique opportunity to live out their dreams. The Mini Meteorologist Contest, sponsored by Lands’ End, will give four kids a chance to present a weather report on The Weather Channel this summer.

The nationwide contest is open to future meteorologists in the U.S. and Canada ages 6 to 16. To enter, they just have to write an essay between 50 and 500 words long on why they love learning about science and weather and why they’d like to be a meteorologist for a day. Four winners will receive a trip for them and their parents to The Weather Channel’s headquarters in Atlanta. They’ll have the opportunity to report the weather for the show on July 12, which happens to be National Summer Learning Day.

The essays will be judged based in equal parts on creativity, grammar, and the entrant’s love of meteorology. The only rules for the essays are that they can’t mention any products or brands other than Lands’ End or The Weather Channel (so no essays about how L.L. Bean inspired your love of cloud formations, kids) and has to be the child’s original work. Kids who are chosen as semi-finalists will have their on-air presentation skills judged in a Skype interview.

Should they win, they’ll get an inclusive trip to Atlanta with media training, a tour of The Weather Channel headquarters, and a $500 Lands’ End gift card to get just the right weather-reporting wardrobe.

The deadline for entering is May 21. Essays can be submitted here.

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Weather Watch
Thanks to Desert Dust, Eastern Europe Is Covered in Orange Snow
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Certain areas of Eastern Europe are starting to look a bit like Mars. Over the last few days, snowy places like Sochi, Russia have experienced an unusual snowfall that coated mountains in orange powder, according to the BBC.

The orange snow was the result of winds blowing sand from the Sahara east to places like Moldova, Romania, Bulgaria, Ukraine, and Russia. The sand mixes with precipitation to form orange-tinted snow. According to the BBC, the phenomenon occurs semi-regularly, turning snow orange about once every five years, but this year is especially sandy. As a result, skiers are navigating slopes that look like they're from a different world, as you can see in the video below from The Guardian.

The Sahara rarely gets snow, but when it does, the landscape can look somewhat similar, as you can see in this image of the Atlas mountains in Morocco.

Instagram is currently filled with photos and videos from Eastern Europe featuring the odd-looking snow. Check out a few samples below.

[h/t BBC]

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