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New Google Maps Feature Helps You Find Your Parked Car

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A new feature from Google Maps could drastically shorten the time you spend wandering parking lots. As Mashable reports, the app now gives users the option to save their parking location before stepping out of the car.

The new feature is available in the latest update of Maps for iOS and Android. To access it, users tap the blue dot on the map that shows their location. A list of options will pop up, one of which reads: “Set as parking location.” After selecting it, a blue circle with the letter “P” inside appears, marking where you parked.

The pin was designed to track parking spots, but, in theory, it could work for any location you need to leave and come back to later. Android users are able to take a photo of the space, add a note detailing where it is, and set a timer reminding them when to start heading back. On iOS, an address and photo pulled from street view are automatically attached to the location. Both versions allow users to share the location with a friend.

The technology first appeared on Google Maps beta for Android in March, before making its official launch on both platforms on April 25. A different automatic parking-detection tool has been available on Maps through iOS since 2016. To use it, drivers had to connect their devices to their cars via bluetooth. This latest feature is accessible to everyone and can be activated manually.

[h/t Mashable]

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How to Spot the Convincing New Phishing Scam Targeting Netflix Users
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Netflix may send customers the occasional email, but these messages will never ask you to provide them with personal or payment info. You'll want to keep this in mind if you encounter a new phishing scam that The Daily Dot reports is targeting the video streaming service's subscribers in Australia and the UK.

MailGuard, an Australian email security company, was the first to take notice of the fraudulent emails. While similar scams have targeted Netflix users in the past, this current iteration appears to be more convincing than most. At first (and perhaps even second) glance, the messages appear to be legitimate messages from Netflix, with an authentic-looking sender email and the company’s signature red-and-white branding. The fake emails don’t contain telltale signs of a phishing attempt like misspelled words, irregular spacing, or urgent phrasing.

The subject line of the email informs recipients that their credit card info has been declined, and the body requests that customers click on a link to update their card's expiration date and CVV. Clicking leads to a portal where, in addition to the aforementioned details, individuals are prompted to provide their email address and full credit card number. After submitting this valuable info, they’re redirected to Netflix’s homepage.

So far, it’s unclear whether this phishing scheme has widely affected Netflix customers in the U.S., but thousands of people in both Australia and the U.K. have reportedly fallen prey to the effort.

To stay safe from phishing scams—Netflix-related or otherwise—remember to never, ever click on an email link unless you’re 100 percent sure it’s valid. And if you do end up getting duped, use this checklist as a guide to safeguard your compromised data.

[h/t The Daily Dot]

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7 Science-Backed Ways to Improve Your Memory
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Being cursed with a bad memory can yield snafus big and small, from forgetting your gym locker combination to routinely blowing deadlines. If your New Year's resolution was to be less forgetful in 2018, it's time to start training your brain. The infographic below, created by financial website Quid Corner and spotted by Lifehacker Australia, lists seven easy ways to boost memory retention.

Different techniques can be applied to different scenarios, whether you're preparing for a speech or simply trying to recall someone's phone number. For example, if you're trying to learn a language, try writing down words and phrases, as this activates your brain into paying more attention. "Chunking," or separating long digit strings into shorter units, is a helpful hack for memorizing number sequences. And those with a poetic bent can translate information into rhymes, as this helps our brains break down and retain sound structures.

Learn more tips by checking out the infographic below.

[h/t Lifehacker.com.au]

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