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Vimeo / TravisD
Vimeo / TravisD

The Rabbit of Seville

Vimeo / TravisD
Vimeo / TravisD

It's Sunday, it's springtime — why not enjoy a classic cartoon with me?

The Rabbit of Seville was released in December of 1950, and went on to become one of the best-loved cartoons of all time (it was voted twelfth of the top 50 in a 1994 poll). Director Chuck Jones and writer Michael Maltese draw on Rossini's opera The Barber of Seville for inspiration, playing six minutes of Rossini's opera while Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd do battle onstage at the Hollywood Bowl, occasionally even singing along. It's a classic Bugs-and-Elmer routine, complete with Bugs dressing up as a lady (how did that ever work?!), lots of cartoon violence, and jokes galore.

While you watch, note the number of fingers Bugs Bunny has. He's traditionally drawn with three fingers and a thumb on each hand, but in one shot at 6:17 (where he's "playing piano" on Elmer's head), Bugs suddenly has full human hands.

This wasn't the only time Chuck Jones worked with opera in a Bugs Bunny cartoon. Read D.B. Grady's Chuck Jones retrobituary for a snippet on Jones's use of Wagner in the classic What's Opera, Doc?

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MGM Home Entertainment
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entertainment
The Beatles’s Yellow Submarine Is Returning to Theaters for Its 50th Anniversary
MGM Home Entertainment
MGM Home Entertainment

The Beatles are coming! The Beatles are coming!

In early 1968, at the height of Beatlemania, The Fab Four lent their voices—and visages—to Yellow Submarine, a somewhat strange and slightly surreal animated film, purportedly for children, which saw the band travel to Pepperland aboard the titular watercraft in order to save the land from the music-hating Blue Meanies. (Hey, we said it was strange.)

Though it would be another year before the film’s iconic soundtrack was released, 2018 marks the film’s 50th anniversary. To celebrate the occasion, Pitchfork reports that the psychedelic cartoon will be making its way back into theaters in July with a brand-new 4K digital restoration and a surround sound remix, to have it looking—and sounding—pristine.

To find out where it will be screening near you, visit the film’s website, where you can sign up for updates.

[h/t: Pitchfork]

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DESIREE MARTIN, AFP/Getty Images
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science
Stephen Hawking's Big Ideas, Made Simple
DESIREE MARTIN, AFP/Getty Images
DESIREE MARTIN, AFP/Getty Images

On March 14, 2018, visionary physicist Stephen Hawking passed away at the age of 76. You know his name, and may have even watched a biopic or two about him. But if you've ever wondered what specifically Hawking's big contributions to science were, and you have two and a half minutes to spare, the animation below is for you. It's brief, easy to understand, and gets to the point with nice narration by Alok Jha. So here, in a very brief and simple way, are some of Stephen Hawking's big ideas:

If you have more than a few minutes, we heartily recommend Hawking's classic book A Brief History of Time. It's easy to read, and it's truly brief.

[h/t: Open Culture]

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