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Watch the Original Unaired Three's Company Pilot

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It’s standard practice in television to shoot a pilot episode of a proposed show in order for a network to get it greenlit and picked up, as they say in the biz. Sometimes the pilot needs to be fine-tuned and recast, so a second one is filmed. But in the case of Three’s Company, it took three different pilots before ABC finally added it to their schedule.

This is the very first pilot, and fans of the sitcom can have a field day playing “spot the differences.” John Ritter’s character is named David Bell (instead of Jack Tripper) and he’s an aspiring filmmaker who learned his mad cooking skills from a two-week stint at the Pup & Knish. The two women roommates were named Jenny and Samantha and were played by Valerie Curtin (Jane’s cousin) and Suzanne Zenor. Samantha was blonde and squeaky-voiced, but lacked the endearing naiveté of the character that eventually became Chrissy. Mr. Roper (named George here) was still a dud in the boudoir, but his wife seemed to be pretty nonchalant about her husband’s lack of libido.

Watch for yourself:

ABC liked the script, and network honcho Fred Silverman in particular was enthusiastic about Three’s Company; the British version, Man about the House, had been a big hit in the U.K. and he was looking for some “racier” programming to shake up the prime time line-up. He enlisted the help of Don Nicholl, Michael Ross, and Bernie West, who’d had great success in adapting All in the Family from the BBC’s Till Death do Us Part, and their first suggestion was to re-cast the roles of the female roommates. They hired Joyce DeWitt to play the wise-cracking dark-haired roommate (now named Janet), and shot a second pilot with Susan Lanier as Chrissy. Close, but still not quite right, ABC said. You need a different Chrissy. Auditions were held and Suzanne Somers was chosen personally by Fred Silverman just days before the series went into production.

Thanks to Adam Feldman for putting this out there on Twitter, and Alan Sepinwall for retweeting it so we could see it.

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Deliveroo
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Pop Culture
Hot Pie From Game of Thrones Opened a Real-Life Bakery in London
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Deliveroo

Ben Hawkey is best known for playing Hot Pie, Arya Stark’s Direwolf bread-baking companion on Games of Thrones. The actor recently got the chance to demonstrate his baking skills in the real world with the opening of You Know Nothing John Dough, a pop-up London bakery inspired by the HBO series.

A venture between Hawkey and the UK-based food delivery service Deliveroo, You Know Nothing John Dough launched for Deliveroo members on July 17, to coincide with the series' seventh season premiere. The menu consisted entirely of Direwolf-shaped loaves made with whole wheat cornbread and orange zest. According to Digital Spy, the treats were meant to be eaten warm with soft butter.

Dire wolf loaves on a cookie sheet.
Deliveroo

"It's brilliant that we have been able to help Ben realize his dream of opening a real-world bakery, bringing a classic piece of on-screen cuisine to the real world," a spokesperson for Deliveroo told Digital Spy of the culinary collaboration.

Ben Hawkey holds tray of Dire Wolf bread.
Deliveroo

Fans snatched the treats up quickly, which was no surprise considering that they were selling for just £1 (about $1.30) a pop. That’s a bargain compared to some Game of Thrones-themed desserts. While the bakery was meant as a one-time tie-in to the new season premiere, don't be surprised to see it pop up again; you can keep an eye on its Deliveroo page here.

[h/t Digital Spy]

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The 5 Best Sci-Fi Movies on Netflix Right Now
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Nicolas Cage stars in Knowing (2009).
Vince Valitutti/Summit Entertainment

If you’re in the mood for some speculative fiction and your pile of Arthur C. Clarke books has been exhausted, you could do worse than to tune in to Netflix. The streaming service is constantly acquiring new films in the sci-fi and fantasy genres that should satisfy most fans of alternative futures. Here are five of the best sci-fi movies on Netflix right now.

1. THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL (1951)

If any film stands as a proper influence on The Twilight Zone and its use of science-fiction and fantasy to mask political and civil issues, it’s The Day the Earth Stood Still, a Cold War-era parable about an alien named Klaatu who arrives on Earth carrying a warning about warfare. Naturally, all humans want to do is shoot him.

2. METROPOLIS (1927)

Inspiring everything from Star Wars to Lady Gaga, Fritz Lang’s silent epic about a revolt among the oppressed people who help power an upper-class city remains just as visually impressive today as it did nearly 100 years ago.

3. TROLL HUNTER (2010)

A Norwegian fairy tale with bite, Troll Hunter follows college-aged filmmakers who convince a bear trapper to take them along on his exploits. But the trapper fails to disclose one crucial detail: He hunts towering, aggressive trolls.

4. KNOWING (2009)

The histrionics of Nicolas Cage: You either like them or you don’t. Knowing is Cage at half-caf: While he enjoys a few meltdown scenes, he’s largely reserved here as an astrophysics professor who stumbles onto information that could herald the end of the world.

5. THE HOST (2006)

A slow-burn monster movie from South Korea, The Host has plenty of tense scenes coupled with a message about environmental action: The river-dwelling beast who stalks a waterfront town is the product of chemical dumping.  

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