Discover Magazine
Discover Magazine

6 Terrific Tattoos On Teachers

Discover Magazine
Discover Magazine

While we’ve seen librarians and scientists with tattoos, there is still a bit of a stigma against teachers coming into school with full sleeves of ink. Most K-12 teachers have to hide their tattoos, but college students seem to prefer it when their professors have them. A study by Brookdale Community College in New Jersey found that undergraduates tended to believe that potential teachers with tattoos would motivate them more and give them more creative assignments. Even without taking classes from the tattooee, the students were more likely to recommend the subject as an instructor. As these students grow older and have kids of their own, maybe we’ll start to see more tattooed kindergarten teachers bearing their ink proudly.

1. Teacher From the Black Lagoon

Beware ill-educated, co-ed swimmers: This monster is ready to make sure you sit down and learn! For some, this threat is far more terrifying than the idea of being ripped apart. While I can’t tell you who bears this great work, I do know it is being done (it's not yet complete in this image) by Mez Love of Tattoo Boogaloo in San Francisco.

2. Darwin Kong

Both Chris and his wife teach science in eastern Massachusetts, and in each of their classrooms, they hang this New Yorker cartoon. As such, it was particularly fitting for Chris to get this design tattooed on his leg. He really likes the cartoon because he sees it as “the establishment trying to destroy Darwin for the same reason it destroyed Kong: it just didn’t understand him.”

3. Preschool Teacher

Perhaps there would be fewer stigmas against teacher tattoos if the artwork was all as adorable as Leslie Duss' ink, who proudly celebrates her role as a pre-school teacher with this cute, sketch-like design.

4. Moth

Hannah Rosa teaches science in Central London and was one of 100 people who agreed to tattoo a drawing by Jai Redman of a rare or endangered British animal as part of the Ext-inked Project. Hannah’s particular endangered species under the project is the narrow bordered bee hawk-moth, a unique insect that mimics the look of the bumblebee for its own protection. Before working as a teacher, Hannah worked with endangered species during college, and for this reason, she felt that participating in the Ext-inked project would allow her to serve as “a life-long ambassador so that I can educate others about the impacts of climate change and other human activities, which are threatening hundreds of species in the UK alone.”

5. The Quadratic Formula

Flickr user Azchael met the bearer of this tattoo at a summer festival in 2008. The girl with the tattoo is an elementary school teacher who has to cover up her tattoo while at work. She quickly pointed out that her students would hardly recognize the quadratic formula anyway—it's a little too advanced for the young children she teaches.

6. Banksy-Style

Flickr user Bart Heird spotted this tattoo at the Chicago Comic Con, and upon talking to the woman with the artwork, he found out that the piece was particularly fitting as she was an art teacher.

There are surprisingly few pictures of tattooed teachers online, but we can change that! If you’re a teacher and you have any interesting ink, post a picture or a link in the comments. Maybe we can start the first real definitive collection of teacher tattoos.

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Christie's
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Art
A Rare Copy of Audubon's Birds of America Could Break Records at Auction
Christie's
Christie's

American artist and naturalist John James Audubon published The Birds of America in the first half of the 19th century, and his massive “double-elephant” folio of life-size bird illustrations remains one of the most ambitious nature books ever produced. On June 14, a rare edition of the four-book set is hitting the auction block, and it's expected to fetch up to $12 million—more than any Audubon book ever sold.

This edition of The Birds of America was owned by the dukes of Portland from around 1839 to 2012. Because it was stored on the shelves of the family's Nottinghamshire, England estate for nearly a century, the set's prints of watercolor drawings have remained remarkably well-preserved.

In 2012, the copy was auctioned off to philanthropist and businessman Carl W. Knobloch, Jr. for nearly $8 million. Knobloch donated the books to the Knobloch Family Foundation (KFF) before his death in 2016. Now, the KFF is sending the books to auction once again. This time, all proceeds of the sale will go to nature conservation.

Set of red leather-bound books.

New York City auction house Christie's describes the set in a listing as "among the finest copies in private hands of this icon of American art, and the finest color-plate book ever produced." Each of the 435 double-elephant folio pages measures 39.5 inches by 26.5 inches, the largest sheets Audubon could get his hands on at the time, and they feature 1037 birds from 500 species. The books are bound in red Moroccan leather with gold detailing on the borders and spines. The four-volume set also comes with the Ornithological Biography, a collection of five books describing the specimens in The Birds of America and their habits.

Christie's estimates the set will sell for $8 million to $12 million when the final bid is placed later this month. To date, the most expensive copy of The Birds of America was a first edition acquired from Sotheby's in London for $11.5 million. That sale also broke the record for the most expensive printed book ever sold at auction, a record held until 2013.

Illustration of American birds.

Illustration of American bird.

Illustration of American birds.

Illustration of American birds.

Illustration of American birds.

All images courtesy of Christie's

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Courtesy of Emi Nakajima
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Art
Artist Makes Incredibly Detailed Drawings of Famous Buildings Around the World
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

They say patience is a virtue, but for some artists it’s a necessity. Emi Nakajima’s detailed ink drawings of famous architectural sites, which recently appeared on My Modern Met, typically take about a week to complete. However, her most ambitious undertaking yet—a rendering of Thailand’s Wat Rong Khun (White Temple)—was a five-month endeavor.

Emi Nakajima holding up her drawing in front of the White Temple
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

The Japanese-Thai artist told Mental Floss that the White Temple was particularly difficult to draw. She typically uses A3-sized paper (11.7 by 16.5 inches) for her projects, but she decided to draw the ornate temple on a much larger scale. The paper covered her entire desk—and getting each arch and spiral just right was no small feat. She took her time on the details, chipping away at the drawing after returning home from her day job as an administrative officer in Thailand.

Emi Nakajima drawing
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

Details of the drawing
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

Details of the drawing
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

The completed temple drawing
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

She’s amassed nearly 39,000 followers on Instagram, where she documents the progression of her projects from start to completion. Although her prints aren’t available for purchase online, she does sell her drawings locally.

European architecture features prominently in her work, with past projects including drawings of London’s Big Ben, Barcelona’s Sagrada Família basilica, and France’s Gothic churches. She occasionally branches out from architecture, creating 3D images of food and drawings of superheroes, movie characters, and animals.

Keep scrolling down to see more of Nakajima's architectural drawings, and check out her Instagram page (@emi_nkjm) here.

A drawing of Big Ben
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

Drawing of a cathedral
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

A pagoda drawing
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

Details of a drawing
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

A cathedral drawing
Courtesy of Emi Nakajima

[h/t My Modern Met]

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