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6 Terrific Tattoos On Teachers

Discover Magazine
Discover Magazine

While we’ve seen librarians and scientists with tattoos, there is still a bit of a stigma against teachers coming into school with full sleeves of ink. Most K-12 teachers have to hide their tattoos, but college students seem to prefer it when their professors have them. A study by Brookdale Community College in New Jersey found that undergraduates tended to believe that potential teachers with tattoos would motivate them more and give them more creative assignments. Even without taking classes from the tattooee, the students were more likely to recommend the subject as an instructor. As these students grow older and have kids of their own, maybe we’ll start to see more tattooed kindergarten teachers bearing their ink proudly.

1. Teacher From the Black Lagoon

Beware ill-educated, co-ed swimmers: This monster is ready to make sure you sit down and learn! For some, this threat is far more terrifying than the idea of being ripped apart. While I can’t tell you who bears this great work, I do know it is being done (it's not yet complete in this image) by Mez Love of Tattoo Boogaloo in San Francisco.

2. Darwin Kong

Both Chris and his wife teach science in eastern Massachusetts, and in each of their classrooms, they hang this New Yorker cartoon. As such, it was particularly fitting for Chris to get this design tattooed on his leg. He really likes the cartoon because he sees it as “the establishment trying to destroy Darwin for the same reason it destroyed Kong: it just didn’t understand him.”

3. Preschool Teacher

Perhaps there would be fewer stigmas against teacher tattoos if the artwork was all as adorable as Leslie Duss' ink, who proudly celebrates her role as a pre-school teacher with this cute, sketch-like design.

4. Moth

Hannah Rosa teaches science in Central London and was one of 100 people who agreed to tattoo a drawing by Jai Redman of a rare or endangered British animal as part of the Ext-inked Project. Hannah’s particular endangered species under the project is the narrow bordered bee hawk-moth, a unique insect that mimics the look of the bumblebee for its own protection. Before working as a teacher, Hannah worked with endangered species during college, and for this reason, she felt that participating in the Ext-inked project would allow her to serve as “a life-long ambassador so that I can educate others about the impacts of climate change and other human activities, which are threatening hundreds of species in the UK alone.”

5. The Quadratic Formula

Flickr user Azchael met the bearer of this tattoo at a summer festival in 2008. The girl with the tattoo is an elementary school teacher who has to cover up her tattoo while at work. She quickly pointed out that her students would hardly recognize the quadratic formula anyway—it's a little too advanced for the young children she teaches.

6. Banksy-Style

Flickr user Bart Heird spotted this tattoo at the Chicago Comic Con, and upon talking to the woman with the artwork, he found out that the piece was particularly fitting as she was an art teacher.

There are surprisingly few pictures of tattooed teachers online, but we can change that! If you’re a teacher and you have any interesting ink, post a picture or a link in the comments. Maybe we can start the first real definitive collection of teacher tattoos.

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iStock
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Art
The Simple Optical Illusion That Makes an Image Look Like It's Drawing Itself
iStock
iStock

Artist James Nolan Gandy invents robot arms that sketch intricate mathematical shapes with pen and paper. When viewed in real time, the effect is impressive. But it becomes even more so when the videos are sped up in a timelapse. If you look closely in the video below, the illustration appears to materialize faster than the robot can put the design to paper. Gizmodo recently explained how the illusion works to make it look like parts of the sketch are forming before the machine has time to draw them.

The optical illusion isn’t an example of tricky image editing: It’s the result of something called the wagon wheel effect. You can observe this in a car wheel accelerating down the highway or in propeller blades lifting up a helicopter. If an object makes enough rotations per second, it can appear to slow down, move backwards, or even stand still.

This is especially apparent on film. Every “moving image” we see on a screen is an illusion caused by the brain filling in the gaps between a sequence of still images. In the case of the timelapse video below, the camera captured the right amount of images, in the right order, to depict the pen as moving more slowly than it did in real life. But unlike the pen, the drawing formed throughout the video isn't subject to the wagon-wheel effect, so it still appears to move at full speed. This difference makes it look like the sketch is drawing itself, no pen required.

Gandy frequently shares behind-the-scenes videos of his mechanical art on his Instagram page. You can check out some of his non-timelapse clips like the one below to better understand how his machines work, then visit his website to browse and purchase the art made by his 'bots.

And if you think his stuff is impressive, make sure to explore some of the incredible art robots have made in the past.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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Tessa Angus
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Surprising Sculptures Made From Fallen Feathers
Kate MccGwire, Orchis, 2012
Kate MccGwire, Orchis, 2012
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire is a British sculptor with an unusual medium: feathers. Her surreal, undulating works often take the form of installations—the feathers spilling out of a drain, a stove, a crypt wall—or stand-alone sculptures in which antique bell jars, cabinets, or trunks contain otherworldly shapes.

MccGwire developed her obsession with feathers after moving to a studio barge on the Thames in 2006, as she explains in a video from Crane.tv recently spotlighted by Boing Boing. The barge was near a large shed full of feral pigeons, whose feathers she would spot on her way to work. "I started picking them up and laying them out, collecting them," she remembers. "And after about two weeks I had like 300 feathers." At the time, concerns about bird flu were rife, which made the feathers seem "dangerous as well as beautiful."

When not supplied by her own next-door menagerie, the feathers for her artwork come from a network of racing pigeon societies all over the UK, who send her envelopes full every time the birds molt. Farmers and gamekeepers also send her fallen feathers from birds such as magpies, pheasants, and roosters.

The cultural associations around birds are a big part of what inspires MccGwire. “The dove is the symbol of peace, purity, and fertility," she told ArtNews in 2013, "but it’s exactly the same species as a pigeon—which everyone regards as being dirty, foul, a pest.”

The same duality is present in her own work, which she frequently shares on her Instagram account. “I want to seduce by what I do—but revolt in equal measure. It’s really important to me that you’ve got that rejection of things you think you know for sure.”

You can see some pictures of MccGwire's work, and watch the video from Crane.tv, below.

Kate MccGwire's installation "Evacuate"
Evacuate, 2010
J Wilde

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Convolous"
Convolous, 2015
JP Bland

Kate MccGwire's installation "Gyre"
Gyre, 2012
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Gag"
Gag, 2009
JP Bland

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Writhe"
Writhe, 2010
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Quell"
Quell, 2011
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Taunt"
Taunt, 2012
Tessa Angus

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