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A&E/Joe Lederer

Bates Motel Recap, Episode 2: "Nice Town You Picked, Norma."

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A&E/Joe Lederer

We open with Norman clicking a flashlight on and off on as he flips through the little black book he found last week. He’s torn away from his makeshift movie when the doorbell rings. Surprise! It’s Black Sheep Bates, AKA older brother Dylan, and he's looking for a place to call home. Neither Norman nor Norma are thrilled about this development, which Norman expresses by getting overprotective about baked goods. “The bread’s gonna get stale,” he glares when Dylan leaves the bag open at breakfast. Dylan is unmoved.

“Why are you here?” Norma asks her eldest son, and he replies that when people are down and out, as he is, they tend to go home. “Although most normal mothers don’t move their home out of state and try and hide it from their own son.” Burn.

Speaking of burns, down at the bus stop, a car comes tearing wildly down the road, crashing just yards from where Bradley, Norman, and the usual gaggle of girls are standing. It’s Bradley’s father’s car, and when Norman yanks the door open, we discover a charred mess of raw meat that is, in fact, Mr. Martin.

When Sheriff Romero (homage to George, perhaps?) and Deputy Shelby arrive on the scene, we learn that Martin owns a warehouse nearby. “Looks like somebody set a fire there. He was trapped inside of it,” Romero explains. He doesn’t get the chance to spill more confidential information because another officer has inconveniently discovered Keith Summers’ abandoned truck in the woods. Romero questions Norma, but she says she hasn’t seen the motel’s former owner. After a lingering look at the truck, she wishes Romero good luck with everything.

“In a town like this, where the hell do you get that kind of money?”

The sweet sounds of Genuwine’s “Pony” comes blaring out of a seedy place called “The Candy Stick.” (If Channing Tatum is watching, he probably just busted a move or two.) Inside, the bleach-blonde half-heartedly caressing a stripper pole seems to be right where she belongs; the guy weeping at the end of the catwalk does not. After he catches Dylan staring at him, weepy guy explains that his boss had been badly burned, probably fatally. He then buys Dylan a drink, flashing a big wad of hundys. “Dude, in a town like this, where the hell do you get that kind of money?” Dylan asks. Later, weepy guy introduces him to a man named Gil, who wants to know if Dylan knows how to use a gun. (He does.) I have a feeling Norman’s brother is about to discover where the cash flows from.

"How’d you get all this money, Norma?”

Dylan returns home in the middle of the night, and Norma is ready for him. “Listen, dumbass, this is not going to stand,” she starts. Dylan retaliates by saying she drove his dad out by “skanking around with Norman’s father.” Norma defends herself, saying she was only 17 when she met Dylan’s dad, so it wasn’t surprising that she later fell in love with Sam.

“Oh yeah?” Dylan asks, “How’d that work out for you?”

“I hate you,” she responds, and her son shrugs. He changes the subject, abruptly wondering how Norma afforded a motel and a new car. She claims it was the settlement from Sam’s death. “He sold insurance and he was well-covered,” she says, lamely. Dylan clearly doesn’t buy it.

"How could a God who made all of this beautiful stuff also make things that are evil?”

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The next morning, the mother and son duo of Norma(n) cleans the kitchen floor obsessively, worried about the discovery of Summers’ truck. The doorbell rings, and with it comes a bit of comic relief: “I got it, gang, it’s cool. Don’t stop your Swiffering,” Dylan says, then opens the door to find that Norman’s friend Emma has arrived for the study date she finagled in English class the other day.

Norma, of course, gives Emma the third degree, though not unkindly. Emma explains that she has cystic fibrosis, then gives all of us a little lesson on what it is: “It’s when your lungs create a lot of thick mucus, and it makes it really hard to breathe. Some would say impossible. I’m on a list for a lung transplant. God knows if I’ll ever get one in time,” she says.

“Well, I hope you do,” Norma says, unnecessarily. “What is your life expectancy, Emma?”

“Maybe... 27?” Emma shrugs. Norma looks thoughtful. A companion for Norman who won’t be a long-term competitor? Could anything be more perfect?

Upstairs, Emma and Norman get to work analyzing William Blake’s “The Tyger.”

“It’s about, how could a God who made all of this beautiful stuff in the world, also make things that are scary and evil? It could work—we could talk about it in terms of famous contemporary murders, like OJ, or Charles Manson,” Emma says. Before we have time to ponder the fact that she’s sitting in the bedroom of a famous contemporary murderer, she spots the black book poking out from under Norman’s mattress and flips through it. “These pictures are amazing,” she says. “Did you draw these?”

Horrified, Norman sputters that he found it and didn’t know know what to do with it when Emma interrupts. “Oh, please. I’ve read a lot of manga, a lot steamier than this,” she says, and asks to borrow it.

"I never said I hadn’t ever seen him.”

Norma rubs lotion on her skin or else she gets the hose again—I mean, she rubs lotion on her legs and we get a glimpse of a massive scar on the inside of her thigh. Doorbell! Bates Motel is like Grand Central Station. Doesn’t anybody text? Sheriff Romero doesn’t, I guess, and he’s there to discuss Summers. A witness says he saw Norma(n) having a “heated” discussion with the missing man, even though Norma said she hadn’t seen him. Then they do a little dance that goes something like this:

Norma: “I didn’t know that you had meant had I ever seen him; I thought you meant recently.”
Romero: “Well, some people might think in the last week as being recently.”
Norma: “Yeah, some people might.”
Romero: “So you’re admitting you did see him.”
Norma: “No, I never said I hadn’t ever seen him, so I’m not admitting anything.”

She also mentions that Summers has disappeared, which the sheriff hasn’t mentioned yet. “You’re implying it,” she says. “No, I believe you’re inferring it,” he responds. Now suspicious, Romero asks to look inside. Norma tells him to come back with a warrant.

"I’m just doing what I need to do.”

Norma’s alone in her car, flipping radio stations as she drives. At first her choice of Everclear’s “Santa Monica” seems like a rather un-Norma choice, but the lyrics are on the nose with the world she’s trying to create for herself and Norman: “We can live beside the ocean / leave the fire behind / swim out past the breakers / watch the world die.”

In order to make that world happen, she has to make this current problem disappear. So she pulls up near Deputy Shelby and calls him over, in full flirtation mode. “Go ahead, slap the handcuffs on,” she says, sticking her arms out the window with a grin. The deputy bites—he apologizes for Romero’s behavior and offers to buy her a cup of coffee. They hit the local cafe where she tells him the sob story of her widowhood and complains some more about the sheriff. “To be fair, I do think that you were inferring that,” Shelby says, smiling.

“Oh no,” Norma says playfully, “We’re back to that again?” and they’re all soft eyes and giggles. Either Shelby has a crush or he’s taking the Good Cop role really seriously. He tells Norma that the sheriff and Summers were boyhood friends, Summers’ disappearance is quite personal. Then he asks her on a date, sort of. A “charming” local festival is taking place that night, and although he can’t officially ask her out on account of her being a suspect in a missing persons case and all, he suggests that they meet there.

Later, Norma runs into Norman’s room wearing her date outfit and wants to know if it looks like she’s trying too hard. “That depends on what you’re trying,” he says.

She admits that the police know they had talked to Summers and that she’s going on a “Goodwill mission” with Deputy Shelby, then strips her top off right in front of him to change to a different shirt, tossing the other shirt on his bed. Norman looks uncomfortable; she rolls her eyes. “Lord, Norman, I’m your mother. It’s not like it’s weird or anything.”

A&E/Joe Lederer

Upset that Norma is going on a date, Norman declares that he’ll go too. She sits down on his bed and threads her arm through his. “It’s not like I’m actually interested in him,” she explains. “I don’t want you to worry about anything. That’s why I’m doing this.” Then she licks her thumb and performs the very mom-like gesture of rubbing a smudge off of his cheek from where she kissed him. Watch out, Norma—this is ultimately how you meet your demise. In the Bloch novel (and the movies) a jealous Norman ends up poisoning his mother and her lover.

"She’s not a whore.”

A&E/Joe Lederer

Now we’re back at the Bates abode, where Dylan’s cell phone is ringing. The display says that “The Whore” is calling, which Norman disdainfully announces. Dylan grabs it and answers: “Hi Norma.” After a few seconds of immobile rage, Norman rushes across the kitchen at his brother; fighting ensues. After smashing Norman’s face up against the retro fridge, Dylan threatens Norman: “Don’t you come at me again or I will hurt you bad, do you understand?” Then he turns his back.

Norman spots a meat tenderizer in the dish drainer, calmly picks it up, then tries to drive it into the back of his brother’s skull. Dylan dodges at the last second, so Normie shatters a glass-fronted cabinet instead of cranium, then gets his face tenderized by Dylan’s fists. “She’s not a whore,” Norman says softly, even though Dylan’s no longer in the room.

"An eye for an eye.”

The whore in question is enjoying the Woodchuck Festival with Deputy Shelby, sipping a hot drink and discussing the recent strange events. Shelby acknowledges that White Pine Bay is not what it seems, noting that townspeople who claim to make a living with organic pig farms and artisanal cheese are living in million-dollar homes. “There’s different ways to produce an economy, and it’s not always what it seems,” he explains.

“But surely you can’t allow illegal things, bad things to happen here.” Norma says. The deputy makes a vague reference about how people in town handle things their own way. “An eye for an eye,” he says, referencing the deep-fried Mr. Martin. “It’ll get handled.” Norma looks a bit unsettled.

”Someone did this to these girls, Norman, and we can prove it.”

Emma texts Norman to meet her at her dad’s shop, ASAP. He does. It’s full of taxidermy, which we’ll definitely be revisiting in future episodes. Turns out Emma’s dad is one of the best “taxidermy artists” on the West Coast. “But enough about stuffing dead animals. I’m gonna tell you a little story about real, living things,” she says. She’s translated the text in the black book, and it tells a tale of Chinese farm girls sold into the American sex slave industry. When one of them dies of a drug overdose, the other girls are forced to bury her by a shed in a forest. “Look at this,” she says, flipping to a sketch in the book. “That’s Ladyface. It’s a mountain just outside of White Pine Bay.”

“This is all a little peculiar,” Norman says.

“No. You know what’s peculiar? A 17-year-old boy using the world peculiar,” she says, which is what we were all thinking. Then she plants a kiss on him.

“So you in?” she asks. Norman fails at suppressing the goofy grin on his face, and it’s adorable.

"Just keep the music down.”

At home, Norma is trying to tell Dylan that he needs to leave. “You’re toxic. You’re leaving in the morning,” she says, but Black Sheep has other plans. He says he talked to the insurance people when he was trying to find where Norma had moved, and the agent mentioned what a wonderful husband and father her late husband had been.

“Wouldn’t it be interesting if I told them what life with Sam was really like?” Dylan says. “You know, how you guys got along and all.” Norma smiles, and it’s the rueful smile of a woman who has been outfoxed. “Just keep the music down,” she says.

"We’re connected to something so much larger than ourselves.”

A&E

Norman and Emma are out hiking near Ladyface, trying to find the shed in the sketch. It seems ill-advised, given the way Emma is huffing and coughing. She insists that she’s fine, and the pair venture further into the trees. Eventually, they stumble onto a clearing that’s packed with pot. “Holy crap,” Emma says, as guys with large guns spot them and start to give chase. They run through the forest, eventually finding a hiding space where they can crouch down to let the bad guys pass them. “Don’t even breathe,” Norman tells her as the baddies pass by. Then he realizes he’s talking to a girl with cystic fibrosis. “Sorry.” They take off again and manage to find the shed from the sketches, but there’s no time to investigate—they’ve been spotted again. A few moments later, they arrive back at Emma’s orange VW Beetle. So that pot field wasn’t very far in the forest, was it? You can bet we’ll be seeing more of all of that—the shed, the pot field, the bad guys—in the near future.

Presumably around the same time, Norma drives through town and sees people running. She follows their flight and notices Deputy Shelby on the scene. He waves her on through, right past the blackened remains of a human, still flaming, hanging upside down from a decorative mast. This is what “an eye for an eye” means, and Norma knows it. She starts hyperventilating.

Thoughts:
So, Bates Motel is turning very Twin Peaks, isn’t it?The way the girls are restrained in the “manga” Norman and Emma are investigating seems reminiscent of the way Keith Summers handcuffed and duct-taped Norma in the first episode—and since his family owned the hotel for decades, Summers would have had access to the motel room where Norman discovered the book. But something tells me Summers wasn’t exactly a skilled artist capable of such impressive drawings. So who is?

White Pine Bay: An homage to Bodega Bay from The Birds, perhaps?

Norman’s dad’s name, Sam, also happens to be the name of Marion Crane’s boyfriend in Hitchcock’s Psycho. Similarly, Emma is the name of Norman’s aunt in one of the sequels.

Psst, if you need to catch up, here’s the recap from last week.

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Giovanni Rufino - © 2012 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved
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XOXO: 20 Things You Might Not Know About Gossip Girl
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Giovanni Rufino - © 2012 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Ten years ago, Gossip Girl became appointment television for America’s teenagers—and a guilty pleasure for millions more (whether they wanted to admit it or not). Like a new millennium version of Beverly Hills, 90210, the series—which was adapted from Cecily von Ziegesar’s book series of the same name—saw The O.C.’s Josh Schwartz and Stephanie Savage trade in their west coast cool for New York City style as the show followed the lives of a group of friends (and sometimes enemies) navigating the elite world of prep schools and being fabulous on Manhattan's Upper East Side. In honor of the series’ tenth anniversary, here are 20 things you might not have known about Gossip Girl.

1. IT WAS SUPPOSED TO BE A LINDSAY LOHAN MOVIE.

Originally, the plan for adapting Gossip Girl wasn’t for a series at all. It was supposed to be a feature film, with Gilmore Girls creator Amy Sherman-Palladino writing the script and Lindsay Lohan set to star as Blair Waldorf. When those plans fell through, the producers approached Josh Schwartz—who was just wrapping up work on The O.C.—about taking his talent for creating enviable high school worlds to New York City’s Upper East Side.

"The books are a soap opera, and TV makes a lot of sense," executive producer Leslie Morgenstein told Backstage of the decision to go the small-screen route. "When we made the list of writers who would be the best to adapt Gossip Girl for television, Josh was at the top of the list."

2. PENN BADGLEY INITIALLY TURNED DOWN THE ROLE OF DAN HUMPHREY.

Barbara Nitke - © 2012 THE CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Though he was hardly a household name when Gossip Girl premiered, Penn Badgley had been acting for nearly a decade—and had a lot of experience working on first season TV shows that never took off—when he was offered the role of Brooklyn outsider Dan Humphrey, and his initial response was: thanks, but no thanks.

“The reason I turned it down initially was because I was just frustrated,” Badgley told Vulture in 2012. “I was frustrated and I was broke and I was depressed and I was like, ‘I cannot do that again. I can't.’ … Stephanie Savage, the creator [of Gossip Girl], she said to me, ‘I know you might not want to do this again, but just take a look at it.’ And I actually was like, ‘I appreciate so much that you thought of me. I just don't want to do this. Thank you for understanding that I wouldn't want to do this.’ And then they couldn't find anybody for it—which is weird, because a million people could play Dan Humphrey—and she came back around, I was about to get a job as a waiter, and I was like, ‘Okay.’”

3. ULTIMATELY, BADGLEY PROBABLY WISHES HE HAD FOLLOWED HIS INITIAL INSTINCT.

Badgley told Vulture that, “I wouldn't be here without Gossip Girl, so I will always be in debt and grateful. And I've said some sh*t that ... I don't regret it, but I'm just maybe too honest about it sometimes.”

But executive producer Joshua Safran had a different view on the situation. “Penn didn’t like being on Gossip Girl, but …. he was Dan,” Safran told Vanity Fair. “He may not have liked it, but [his character] was the closest to who he was.”

4. THE CREATORS GOT THE IDEA TO CAST BLAKE LIVELY FROM THE INTERNET.

According to Vanity Fair, when it came time to casting the show’s main roles, they cruised some of the online message boards related to the Gossip Girl book series to see which actors fans of the books were suggesting. One name they kept seeing for the role of Serena van der Woodsen: Blake Lively, who had starred in The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. “We didn’t see a lot of other girls for Serena,” Schwartz said. “She has to be somebody that you believe would be sitting in the front row at Fashion Week eventually.”

5. LIKE BADGLEY, LIVELY WAS ON THE VERGE OF QUITTING ACTING.

© 2008 Warner Bros. Television

Like her onscreen (and eventually off-screen) love interest Penn Badgley, Blake Lively was also considering leaving Hollywood when Gossip Girl came calling, so she turned the producers down.

“I said, ‘No, I want to go to college. Thank you, though,’” Lively told Vanity Fair. “Then they said, ‘OK, you can go to Columbia [University] one day a week. After the first year [of the show], it’ll quiet down. Your life will go back to normal and you can start going to school. We can’t put it in writing, but we promise you can go.’ So that’s why I said, ‘OK. You know what? I’ll do this.’”

As for that going back to school and life going back to normal? “When they say, ‘We promise, but we can’t put it in writing,’ there’s a reason they can’t put it in writing,” she said.

6. LEIGHTON MEESTER DYED HER HAIR TO GET THE PART OF BLAIR.

Because Blair Waldorf and Serena van der Woodsen were both best friends and occasional enemies, it was important to the show’s creators that the characters did not look like the same person. That fact almost cost Leighton Meester the role of Blair.

“She came in and she was really funny, and really smart and played vulnerable,” Schwartz recalled of Meester’s audition. “But there was one problem: she was blonde. And Blake was blonde, obviously; Serena had to be blonde. So, [Leighton] went to the sink and dyed her hair. She wanted it.’” (Sounds like something Blair would do.)

7. THE NETWORK WORRIED THAT ED WESTWICK LOOKED LIKE A “SERIAL KILLER.”

Giovanni Rufino - © 2012 THE CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Ed Westwick, who originally auditioned for the role of Nate Archibald but ended up playing bad boy Chuck Bass, almost didn’t land a role on the show at all. Though the show’s co-creators, Schwartz and Savage, loved the darker edge that Westwick brought to the group of friends, The CW worried “that he looked more like a serial killer than a romantic lead.”

“He's menacing and scary, but there's a twinkle in his eye,” casting director David Rapaport told BuzzFeed. “You want to hate him, but you would also probably sleep with him. He's one of those guys you hate for always getting away with things, but you also want to hang out with him and see what he's up to next. He's the guy that's going to give you a joint for the first time or get you drunk for the first time, so you know he's wrong for you, but he's fun.” Fans clearly agreed.

8. WESTWICK CHANNELED HIS INNER CARLTON BANKS TO PLAY CHUCK BASS.

In order to perfect his posh American accent, Westwick—who was born in London—looked to another iconic American television character for help: The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air’s Carlton Banks (Alfonso Ribeiro). “There’s a slight thing in Carlton Banks,” Westwick told Details Magazine in 2008, “that kind of über-preppy, that I did pick up on.”

9. GRETA GERWIG AUDITIONED FOR THE SHOW … IN OVERALLS.

In 2015, Golden Globe-nominated actress Greta Gerwig—who just wrote and directed Lady Bird, starring Saoirse Ronan—talked to HuffPost Live about the mistakes she made early on in her career as an actress. “I have had moments when I was starting out when I was auditioning for things like Gossip Girl," she said. “And they would look at me like, 'Why are you wearing overalls to this audition?' And I'd be like, 'They said she was from a farm!' and they would be like, 'Well, this is Gossip Girl.’” (The role she was auditioning for, Eva Coupeau—a love interest for Chuck—eventually went to Clémence Poésy, who played Fleur Delacour in the Harry Potter movies.

10. BLAIR WALDORF HAD TWO MOMS.

© 2008 Warner Bros. Television

In Gossip Girl’s pilot episode, Blair’s mom—popular women’s clothing designer Eleanor Waldorf—was played by Florencia Lozano. In episode two, and throughout the rest of the series, Eleanor was portrayed by Margaret Colin.

11. IT WAS ONE OF TELEVISION’S FIRST STREAMING SUCCESS STORIES.

Years before House of Cards changed the way we watch, and even define, “television,” Gossip Girl served as a sort of precursor to the streaming generation. While the show’s Nielsen ratings were mediocre, New York Magazine reported that, “New episodes routinely arrived at the No. 1 most-downloaded spot on iTunes, and then there were the hundreds of thousands who were downloading free week-old episodes on the CW's site. Even executives at Nielsen threw up their hands and admitted that Gossip Girl appeared to be speaking to an audience so young and tech-savvy they hadn't really figured it out just yet.” (Lost and The Office had followed similar tracks.)

12. THE SHOW WAS BANNED BY SOME NEW YORK CITY SCHOOLS.

Giovanni Rufino - © 2012 THE CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

According to Vanity Fair, some of the elite New York City private schools that might have shared some similarities with the show’s fictional Constance Billard and St. Jude's banned their students from watching it. (Which, the outlet noted, “only served, in all likelihood, to make the students want to watch it more.”)

13. THE SERIES TURNED ITS CRITICISMS INTO A MARKETING CAMPAIGN.

Even by 2007’s standards, Gossip Girl—for a show about high schoolers on what was mainly known as a teen-friendly television network—seemed to relish in pushing the boundaries of what might be acceptable. It didn’t take long for parental advocacy groups like the Parent Television Council to take very public, and vocal, issue with the show's in-your-face sexuality. When it was criticized as being “mind-blowingly inappropriate” and “every parent’s nightmare,” the show turned those critiques into a marketing campaign to help promote viewership.

14. A WRITERS STRIKE HELPED THE SERIES GROW ITS VIEWERSHIP.

While the show struck a chord with certain audiences immediately upon its release, the 2007-2008 Writers Guild of America Strike proved to be a boon to the series. “The CW, because they couldn’t just run repeats or game shows, [Gossip Girl is] all they had,” Schwartz told Vanity Fair. “They kept re-running the show during the strike so more and more people were watching.” Which led to even higher ratings when the show returned for a second season.

15. DESIGNERS WERE BEGGING TO SEE THEIR FASHIONS WORN ON THE SHOW.

Giovanni Rufino - © 2012 THE CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Just like New York City itself, the fashions in Gossip Girl essentially served as another character. According to a 2008 article in The New York Times, “Merchants, designers, and trend consultants say that Gossip Girl … is one of the biggest influences on how young women spend."

“When we came back with Season 2, so many designers were lining up and wanting to be a part of it,” the show’s costume designer Eric Daman told Vanity Fair. “They wanted their stuff on either Blake or Leighton.”

16. IT SPAWNED ITS OWN CLOTHING LINE.

To capitalize on the show’s influence in the fashion world, Daman and designer Christine Cybelle (a.k.a. Charlotte Russe) created a Gossip Girl-inspired clothing line.

17. KRISTEN BELL PLAYED AN ESSENTIAL PART OF THE SERIES, BUT WAS NEVER CREDITED.

Though viewers had to watch all 121 episodes of Gossip Girl to learn the identity of the titular tattler, Kristen Bell provided the voice for “Gossip Girl” for all six seasons, without credit. And while she sort of hoped that the finale would have revealed that she was indeed “Gossip Girl” all along, that ending was not meant to be. “I’m sure that it would’ve been really cool had I got to play some vicious part and actually come out as Gossip Girl, but I think it was appropriate for one of the main cast members to have surfaced as Gossip Girl,” she told Perez Hilton.

Though she was a key part of the series, she didn’t learn GG’s true identity until the very end of the show—and she was surprised. “I don’t know that I ever forethought it being Dan,” she admitted. “That was a bit of a shocker!" (If it makes her feel any better, Badgley reportedly didn’t learn Gossip Girl’s identity until that scene was actually shot.)

18. JANUARY 26 IS "GOSSIP GIRL DAY" IN NEW YORK CITY.

© 2008 Warner Bros. Television

At least it was in 2012, when then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg proclaimed January 26 “Gossip Girl Day” in celebration of the show’s 100th episode. “I don’t have a whole lot of time to follow what New York magazine has called ‘The Greatest Teen Drama of our time,’” Bloomberg said. “But I am interested in finding out who the real Gossip Girl is—Serena’s cousin, maybe? And I don’t see how Blair could marry Prince Lewis while she is clearly in love with Chuck, although she and Dan became pretty close when they interned at that fashion magazine. And I just wish that Nate and Vanessa had been able to work things out, I guess Nate was preoccupied with everything that was going on with his father and Jenny and, I mean, it was a tangled web, I guess Dan would have ended up making their relationship impossible anyway, but I’m just a casual fan.” 

Super-fans of the show can still take a Gossip Girl tour of New York City.

19. IVANKA TRUMP AND JARED KUSHNER MADE A CAMEO.

Over the full course of the series, plenty of familiar faces popped up, but two in particular seem kind of funny in retrospect: Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner played themselves in a club scene. (Ivanka was apparently a huge fan of the series.) “They did it for the money,” a chuckling Schwartz told Vanity Fair.

20. IN AN ALTERNATIVE UNIVERSE, SERENA IS A SERIAL KILLER.

In 2002, von Ziegesar published a bloody take on her famed book series with Gossip Girl: Psycho Killer, which she said she’d love to see adapted. "I took the original text of the first book and whenever I saw an opportunity, I layered in this story of Serena coming back from boarding school as this coldblooded psychopath, which, to me makes total sense,” von Ziegesar told Entertainment Weekly. “She’s sort of like the Ryan Gosling of Gossip Girl world. She has that deadpan style, doesn’t seem to have much personality, and she’s really gorgeous, but then underneath she has this kind of scary ability to kill people. So she’s murdered people up at boarding school. She’s always had this dark side and everyone is a little bit scared of her.”

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12 Sharp Facts About Hellraiser
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Thirty years ago, on September 18, 1987, New World Pictures released Hellraiser, a horror film about a family who opens a puzzle box and invites hell in their lives in the form of pleasure-pain creatures known as Cenobites, who are lead by Pinhead (played by Doug Bradley). Unlike many other horror films at the time, Hellraiser wasn’t a slasher film, and Pinhead wasn’t a boogeyman.

British novelist, playwright, and screenwriter Clive Barker wanted to direct a feature film, so he adapted his 1986 horror novella, The Hellbound Heart, into Hellraiser. Despite the graphic nature of the film, it’s really a love story between Julia Cotton and her demented—and skinless—lover Frank  ... whose relationship just so happens to revolve around sadistic torture.

Hellraiser was produced for around a $1 million and grossed $14 million, making it lucrative enough to spawn nine sequels, including this year’s Hellraiser: Judgment. (Bradley hasn’t starred in a Hellraiser film since 2011’s Hellraiser: Revelations, and Barker didn’t direct or write any of the sequels, most of which were direct-to-DVD releases.) On the 30th anniversary of its release, let's take a look back at this horror classic.

1. THE ORIGINS OF PINHEAD CAME FROM A 1973 PLAY.

Before Doug Bradley uttered the catchphrase “We’ll tear your soul apart,” Clive Barker directed him in a 1973 play called Hunters in the Snow, in which Bradley played the Dutchman, a torturer who would become the basis for Pinhead.

“The character I played in Hunters, the Dutchman, I can see echoes of later... Pinhead in Hellraiser," Bradley said. "This strange, strange character whose head was kind of empty but who conveyed all kinds of things.”

Barker’s mid-1980s short story “The Forbidden”—which was adapted into Candyman—from his "Books of Blood" series, featured the first incarnation of Pinhead’s nails. “One image I remember very strongly from 'The Forbidden' was that Clive had built what he called his nail-board, which was basically a block of wood which he’d squared off and then he’d banged six-inch nails in at the intersections of the squares,” Bradley said. “Of course, when I saw the first illustrations for [Pinhead], it rang a bell with me that here was Clive putting the ideas that he’d been playing around with the nail-board in 'The Forbidden,' now 10, 15 years later. He’d now put the image all over a human being’s face.”

2. CLIVE BARKER CAST “REAL ACTORS.”

Unlike many other horror movies of the time, which were more concerned with gore than great acting, Barker insisted that they look for real talent in the casting. “I’m not just taking the 12 most beautiful youths in California and murdering them,” Barker told The Washington Post in 1987. “I’ve got real actors, real performers—and then I’m murdering them.” The “real” refers to British theater actors like Bradley, Clare Higgins, and Andrew Robinson.

3. PINHEAD WASN’T SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE POSTER.

New World Pictures

Bradley said the filmmakers wanted skinned Frank to be on the poster, but the studio said no to the grotesque imagery, so Pinhead was used on the poster instead. “Maybe that came from Clive, because what we get in that image of Pinhead with the box is the heart of the Hellraiser mythology,” Bradley said. “If you put The Engineer or the skinned man on the poster, it’s an amazing image but it’s just an image, and it could come from any movie.” Bradley thought using Pinhead’s face made more sense. “The big success of Pinhead is because the image is so original, so startling. It is just an incredible image to look at, and that made a big difference in terms of the public's perception of the movie.”

4. NO ONE KNEW THAT DOUG BRADLEY WAS PINHEAD.

Bradley’s Pinhead mug was everywhere—on the cover of magazines and on the movie’s poster—but no one mentioned his name. “It was great to be so heavily featured, but there was no way to prove to anyone that it was actually me,” Bradley said. “Those who were following Hellraiser at the time were wondering where the guy with the pins was! Well I can tell you where I was—I was sitting at home in England, watching it all happen from the sidelines.”

5. THE CENOBITES' DESIGN WAS INSPIRED BY S&M CLUBS.

In the box set’s liner notes, Barker wrote that the Cenobites's “design was influenced amongst other things by punk, by Catholicism, and by the visits I would take to S&M clubs in New York and Amsterdam.” Costume designer Jane Wildgoose created the costumes, based on Barker’s instruction of “repulsive glamour.”

“The other notes that I made about what he wanted was that they should be ‘magnificent super-butchers,’” Wildgoose said.

As for Pinhead, Barker said he “had seen a book containing photographs of African fetishes: sculptures of human heads crudely carved from wood and then pierced with dozens, sometimes hundreds, of nails and spikes. They were images of rage, the text instructed.”

6. IT'S REALLY A LOVE STORY.

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Julia is forced to bring men back to her house and murder them for Frank so that he can replenish his flesh. Barker looked at Hellraiser as more of a love story, with Julia committing these heinous acts in the name of love, not just to be brutal for no reason.

“She’s not committing murder in the way that Jason in the Friday the 13th films commits murder—just for the sake of blood-letting —she’s doing it for love,” Barker told Samhain. “So there is a sympathetic quality about her, enhanced hugely in my estimation by the fact that Clare Higgins does it so well.”

7. BARKER’S GRANDFATHER INSPIRED THE PUZZLE BOX.

When a person twists the box, known as the Lament Configuration, it summons the Cenobites from the gates of hell into the individual's world. “I wanted to have access to hell in the book and in the first movie, explored by something rather different than drawing a circle on the floor with magical symbols around it,” Barker told WIRED. “That seemed rather stale and rather old.”

Barker explained his grandfather was a cook on ship and brought back a puzzle box from the Far East. “So when I went back to the problem of how to open the doors of hell, the idea of [using] a puzzle box seemed interesting to me. You know, the image of a cube is everywhere in world culture, whether it’s the Rubik’s Cube or the idea of the [Tesseract] in The Avengers movies. There’s a lot of places where the image of a cube as a thing of power is pertinent. I don’t know why that is, I don’t have any mythic explanation for it, but it seems to work for people.”

8. ROGER EBERT WASN'T A FAN OF THE FILM.

Roger Ebert gave Hellraiser just a half star when he reviewed it in 1987. “Who goes to see movies like this? This is a movie without wit, style, or reason,” he wrote, adding that, “I have seen the future of implausible plotting, and his name is Clive Barker.”

9. SOMEONE HAD THE JOB OF MAGGOT AND COCKROACH WRANGLER.

In England, there was a law in which cockroaches of both sexes weren’t allowed on set, because they could have mated and caused an infestation. So Barker had to hire someone to oversee the situation. “The wrangler, this is the honest truth, had to sex the roaches,” Barker told an audience at a Hellraiser screening. “They were all male. And we had a fridge. They move very fast, so the only way to slow them down was to chill them. We chilled the maggots and the roaches. We'd open it up and it was all reassuring. It was fun.”

10. BARKER PREFERS "HELL PRIEST" TO "PINHEAD."

In The Hellbound Heart, the Cenobite with pins sticking out of his head is called The Hell Priest. One of the special effects guys who worked on the movie gave the character his nickname. “I thought it was a rather undignified thing to call the monster, but once it stuck, it stuck,” Barker told Grantland.

In 2015, Barker published a sequel to The Hellbound Heart, The Scarlet Gospels, which features Pinhead getting annoyed when people call him that—as well as Pinhead’s demise. “He will not be coming back, by the way," Barker said. "That I promise you."

11. A HELLRAISER VS. HALLOWEEN MOVIE ALMOST HAPPENED.

In an interview with Game Radar, Bradley said the success of Freddy vs. Jason led Hellraiser distributor Dimension Films to flirt with a Hellraiser vs. Halloween film. “I was actually getting excited by the prospect of this because Clive said he would write it and John Carpenter said he would direct it,” Bradley said. “I actually spoke to Clive about it a couple of times and he was interested in finding the places where the Halloween and Hellraiser worlds intermeshed.” But Moustapha Akkad, who owned the rights to Halloween, extinguished the idea.

12. THE BRITISH BOARD OF FILM CLASSIFICATION HAD TO CHECK THAT NO RATS WERE HARMED IN THE MAKING OF THE MOVIE.

While the MPAA requested that a spanking scene be cut for its American release, England's BBFC agreed to release the movie as it was, if they were assured that the rats used in the film weren’t hurt. “I had to bring three remote-control rats into the censor’s office and make them wriggle about on the floor,” producer Christopher Figg told The Telegraph. “They wanted to be sure we hadn’t been cruel to them.”

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