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6 People Who Went to Great Lengths for Their Pranks

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Julie Winterbottom is the former editor in chief of Nickelodeon magazine, where she fulfilled her childhood dream of getting paid to write jokes; her book, Pranklopedia: The Funniest, Grossest, Not-Mean Pranks on the Planet! is on sale now. Julie lives in Brooklyn, New York, where she pulls pranks on her boyfriend and cat.

In honor of April Fools’ Day—which is next Monday—here are six people who went to great lengths to pull some one-of-a-kind pranks.

1. A Garden of Mirthly Delights

Hellbrunn.at

Prince Archbishop Markus Sittikus ruled Salzburg from 1612 to 1619. Soon after he ascended the throne, he commissioned a summer palace to be built at the foot of Hellbrunn Mountain. The enormous Italianate mansion was everything you’d expect from a wealthy nobleman—but the garden was another story. Sittikus had the gardens rigged with trick fountains and statues that squirted people with water as they strolled by. A long stone dinner table had nine stools with water nozzles hidden in the seats so Sittikus could give his guests surprise showers. (A tenth stool, reserved for Sittikus, was nozzle-free.) Today Sittikus’s palace is a tourist attraction—and the sprayers still work. So if you end up visiting, watch where you sit.

2. A Rare Breed of Prankster

Feline Historical Foundation

Brian G. Hughes was a New York manufacturer and banker, but according to his 1924 obituary, his true calling was prankster. Hughes liked to hoax prominent people who he believed took themselves too seriously—like the directors of the snooty National Cat Show. In 1895, Hughes bought a stray cat from a hobo for 30 cents, cleaned it up, and a few months later entered it in the show under the name Nicodemus. Hughes told the judges the cat was a rare “Irish Brindle” valued at $3000. Nicodemus won a first prize, at which point Hughes revealed the hoax—and the cat’s real name, Josephine—much to the embarrassment of the judges.

3. Fruit of the Loony

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In 1950, California cartoonist Frank Adams’s wild idea for a prank bore fruit—literally. The National Orange Show had just taken place in San Bernardino, not far from Adams’ home, and there were thousands of oranges left over. Adams managed to get ahold of them and then convinced 25 friends to help him attach all 50,000 oranges to pine trees along a section of the Rim of the World highway. They did the job under cover of night, and the next morning, drivers were amazed to see that the pines trees had magically produced a crop of citrus.

4. All the Way with LBJ

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President Lyndon B. Johnson adored cars and kept a large collection of cherished Lincolns and other vehicles at his Texas ranch. One of his most unusual cars was an Amphicar—it looked like a normal car, but was amphibious and functioned like a motorboat when it entered a body of water. Johnson realized this vehicle was perfect for pranking guests. He would invite his visitors to take a drive around the ranch with him in the blue convertible. When they got to a steep hill at the edge of a lake, Johnson would let the car pick up speed. Then he’d yell, “The brakes don’t work! The brakes won’t hold! We’re going in!” As the car entered the lake, the passengers would panic—until they realized that rather than sinking, they were motoring across the lake. One victim of the prank, Special Assistant to the President Joseph A. Califano, Jr., recalled that his boss teased him later for trying to save his own skin instead of the president’s.

5. A Traffic-Stopping Prank

In 2006, students at Austin High School in Austin, Minnesota engineered a prank that capitalized on the unusual architecture of their school. A busy street separates two buildings on the school’s campus. Students can use the crosswalk or an underground tunnel to get from one building to the other. At an appointed time on the day of the prank, 94 students began filing across the street, using the crosswalk. Then they circled back through the underground tunnel and crossed the street again—and again, and again—creating an endless stream of pedestrians. Traffic was tied up for nearly 10 minutes as cars lined up waiting for the students (including one dressed as a cow and another as a chicken) to finish crossing.

6. Panhandler Party

One evening in August 2012, actor and comedian Gary Lee Mahmoud gave some New York City straphangers the ride of their life. NYC commuters are used to panhandlers coming through the subway cars asking for money or selling candy and other goods. Mahmoud and his co-conspirators took this phenomenon to a hilarious extreme, creating a “panhandler party.” Over the course of four minutes, actors portraying 10 different panhandlers—including an angry Wall Streeter who didn’t get his bonus—invade a single subway car. By the end of the prank, the entire carful of commuters is cracking up.

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Live Smarter
Why the Best Time to Book Your Thanksgiving Travel Is Right Now
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You're never going to get a true steal on holiday plane tickets, but if you want to avoid spending your whole salary flying to visit your relatives over Thanksgiving, the time is nigh to start picking seats. That's according to the experts at Condé Nast Traveler, who cite data from Expedia and Skyscanner.

The latter found that it was cheapest to secure Thanksgiving tickets 11 weeks before the holiday. That means that you should have bought your ticket around September 4, but it's not too late; you can still save if you book now. Expedia's data shows that the cheapest time to buy is 61 to 90 days before you leave, so you still have until September 23 to snag a seat on a major airline without paying an obscene premium. (Relatively speaking, of course.)

When major travel holidays aren't involved, data shows that the best time to book a plane ticket is on a Sunday, at least 21 days ahead of your travel. But given that millions of other Americans also want to fly on the exact same days during Thanksgiving and Christmas, the calculus of booking is a bit more high stakes. If you sleep on tickets this month, you could be missing out on hundreds of dollars in savings. In the recent study cited by Condé Nast Traveler, Expedia found that people booking during the 61- to 90-day window saved up to 10 percent off the average ticket price, while last-minute bookers who bought tickets six days or less from their travel day paid up to 20 percent more.

Once you secure those Turkey Day tickets, you've got a new project: Your Christmas flights. By Hopper's estimates, those flights rise in price by $1.50 every day between the end of October and December 15 (after which they get even more expensive). However, playing the waiting game can be beneficial, too. Expedia found that the cheapest time to book Christmas flights was just 14 to 20 days out.

Before you buy, we also recommend checking CheapAir.com, which tracks 11,000 different airfares for flights around the holidays to analyze price trends. Because as miserable as holiday travel can be, you don't want to pay any more than you have to.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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Big Questions
Why Can’t You Wear White After Labor Day?
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Wearing white in the summer makes sense. Desert peoples have known for thousands of years that white clothing seems to keep you a little bit cooler than other colors. But wearing white only during the summer? While no one is completely sure exactly when or why this fashion rule came into effect, our best guess is that it had to do with snobbery in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

The wives of the super-rich ruled high society with an iron fist after the Civil War. As more and more people became millionaires, though, it was difficult to tell the difference between respectable old money families and those who only had vulgar new money. By the 1880s, in order to tell who was acceptable and who wasn’t, the women who were already “in” felt it necessary to create dozens of fashion rules that everyone in the know had to follow. That way, if a woman showed up at the opera in a dress that cost more than most Americans made in a year, but it had the wrong sleeve length, other women would know not to give her the time of day.

Not wearing white outside the summer months was another one of these silly rules. White was for weddings and resort wear, not dinner parties in the fall. Of course it could get extremely hot in September, and wearing white might make the most sense, but if you wanted to be appropriately attired you just did not do it. Labor Day became a federal holiday in 1894, and society eventually adopted it as the natural endpoint for summer fashion.

Not everyone followed this rule. Even some socialites continued to buck the trend, most famously Coco Chanel, who wore white year-round. But even though the rule was originally enforced by only a few hundred women, over the decades it trickled down to everyone else. By the 1950s, women’s magazines made it clear to middle class America: White clothing came out on Memorial Day and went away on Labor Day.

These days the fashion world is much more relaxed about what colors to wear and when, but every year you will still hear people say that white after Labor Day is unacceptable, all thanks to some snobby millionaires who decided that was a fashion no-no more than 100 years ago.

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