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Getty Images

22 Vintage Photos of Animals Acting Like People

Getty Images
Getty Images

Forget celebrities being just like us. These vintage photos prove that animals have a rich history of indulging in activities usually reserved for humans.

They Listen to Music...

This image: Music lovers partner up for their favourite dance programme on the wireless, February 1926. Top image: A cat wearing headphones to listen to a radio, January 1926.

...And Go to Bars.

January 1936: A camel approaches the bar to be served by "Zandra," the pantomime cat from 'Dick Whittington' at Bournemouth Pavillion.

They Enjoy Family Meals...

July 1936: 'Tornado' Smith, the Wall of Death rider from Southend, and his wife having tea with their pet lion and lamb.

...And Go to Parties.

June 1934: Snake charmer Arimund Banu holds a party for stage performers' pets at the Prince of Wales Theatre, London.

They Play Board Games...

February 1933: A lamb and a cat playing draughts, watched over by a bantam, at Langford, Somerset.

...And Enjoy Sporty Activities!

1940: A young boy on skates clutches a large tabby cat.

Obesity is a problem for them, too.

1935: Ginger, the heaviest cat in London, is greeted by one of the staff at the restaurant where he lives, High Holborn, London, 12th October 1935. Ginger weighs in at twenty-three pounds

They Go on Road Trips...

September 1934: Mrs C Wylds behind the wheel with her pet pig at Terling in Essex.

...And Take Primping Seriously.

April 1932: Feline film star "Tibby" rests on the knee of Abraham Sofaer, leading man in her film for British Lion at Beaconsfield, The Flying Squad, while make-up man Gerald Fairbank trims her whiskers for the camera.

They Indulge in Fine Meals at Fancy Restaurants.

1980: Arthur, the cat food commercial cat, is wined and dined at a fancy restaurant.

They Get Behind the Wheel.

1933: A cat and a bulldog in a toy car.

They sing, too!

1926: Mr Macfrisco, the singing sea lion, has a singing lesson.

They Celebrate Birthdays...

August 1977: A twenty-seven year old cat celebrates her birthday, an age equivalent to 189 in human terms.

...And Go Window Shopping.

American silent film actress Phyllis Gordon (1889 - 1964) window-shopping in Earls Court, London with her four-year-old cheetah who was flown to Britain from Kenya.

They Strike a Pose.

June 1956: Members of the Malayan Police Band Bachan Singh and Abdul Rahman, due to appear at the Royal Tournament, visit London Zoo and make friends with Anabella the Orang-Outang.

They Do Laundry.

September 1933: A cat hangs a row of tame rats on the washing line to dry.

They Need an Annual Checkup from a Good Doctor. 

A zoo vet holding an iguana, circa 1956.

They go tanning.

January 1938: A piglet which is being treated by the PDSA (People's Dispensary for Animals) in Ilford with a sun ray lamp, to cure a skin ailment.

They Wear Glasses...

1925: Film actress Fay Webb with her pet goose, which is wearing an attractive pair of glasses.

...And Use Weapons.

1956: "Carrots" the rabbit fires table tennis balls from a toy cannon.

And hey—they write, too!

1955: A woman teaching her kangaroo to type.

All photos courtesy of Getty Images.

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Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images
How a Hairdresser Found a Way to Fight Oil Spills With Hair Clippings
Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images
Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images

The Exxon Valdez oil tanker made global news in 1989 when it dumped millions of gallons of crude oil into the waters off Alaska's coast. As experts were figuring out the best ways to handle the ecological disaster, a hairdresser from Alabama named Phil McCroy was tinkering with ideas of his own. His solution, a stocking stuffed with hair clippings, was an early version of a clean-up method that's used at real oil spill sites today, according to Vox.

Hair booms are sock-like tubes stuffed with recycled hair, fur, and wool clippings. Hair naturally soaks up oil; most of the time it's sebum, an oil secreted from our sebaceous glands, but it will attract crude oil as well. When hair booms are dragged through waters slicked with oil, they sop up all of that pollution in a way that's gentle on the environment.

The same properties that make hair a great clean-up tool at spills are also what make animals vulnerable. Marine life that depends on clean fur to stay warm can die if their coats are stained with oil that's hard to wash off. Footage of an otter covered in oil was actually what inspired Phil McCroy to come up with his hair-based invention.

Check out the full story from Vox in the video below.

[h/t Vox]

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Bristly
A New Chew Toy Will Help Your Dog Brush Its Own Teeth
Bristly
Bristly

Few pet owners are willing to sit down and brush their pet's teeth on a regular basis. (Most of us can barely convince ourselves to floss our own teeth, after all.) Even fewer pets are willing to sit calmly and let it happen. But pet dental care matters: I’ve personally spent more than $1000 in the last few years dealing with the fact that my cat’s teeth are rotting out of her head.

For dog owners struggling to brush poor Fido’s teeth, there’s a slightly better option. Bristly, a product currently being funded on Kickstarter, is a chew toy that acts as a toothbrush. The rubber stick, which can be slathered with doggie toothpaste, is outfitted with bristles that brush your dog’s teeth as it plays.

A French bulldog chews on a Bristly toy.
Bristly

Designed so your dog can use it without you lifting a finger, it’s shaped like a little pogo stick, with a flattened base that allows dogs to stabilize it with their paws as they hack at the bristled stick with their teeth. The bristles are coated in a meat flavoring to encourage dogs to chew.

An estimated 80 percent of dogs over the age of 3 have some kind of dental disease, so the chances that your dog could use some extra dental attention is very high. In addition to staving off expensive vet bills, brushing your dog's teeth can improve their smelly breath.

Bristly comes in three sizes as well as in a heavy-duty version made for dogs who are prone to ripping through anything they can get their jaws around. A Bristly stick costs $29 and is scheduled to start shipping in October. Get it here.

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