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22 Vintage Photos of Animals Acting Like People

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Getty Images

Forget celebrities being just like us. These vintage photos prove that animals have a rich history of indulging in activities usually reserved for humans.

They Listen to Music...

This image: Music lovers partner up for their favourite dance programme on the wireless, February 1926. Top image: A cat wearing headphones to listen to a radio, January 1926.

...And Go to Bars.

January 1936: A camel approaches the bar to be served by "Zandra," the pantomime cat from 'Dick Whittington' at Bournemouth Pavillion.

They Enjoy Family Meals...

July 1936: 'Tornado' Smith, the Wall of Death rider from Southend, and his wife having tea with their pet lion and lamb.

...And Go to Parties.

June 1934: Snake charmer Arimund Banu holds a party for stage performers' pets at the Prince of Wales Theatre, London.

They Play Board Games...

February 1933: A lamb and a cat playing draughts, watched over by a bantam, at Langford, Somerset.

...And Enjoy Sporty Activities!

1940: A young boy on skates clutches a large tabby cat.

Obesity is a problem for them, too.

1935: Ginger, the heaviest cat in London, is greeted by one of the staff at the restaurant where he lives, High Holborn, London, 12th October 1935. Ginger weighs in at twenty-three pounds

They Go on Road Trips...

September 1934: Mrs C Wylds behind the wheel with her pet pig at Terling in Essex.

...And Take Primping Seriously.

April 1932: Feline film star "Tibby" rests on the knee of Abraham Sofaer, leading man in her film for British Lion at Beaconsfield, The Flying Squad, while make-up man Gerald Fairbank trims her whiskers for the camera.

They Indulge in Fine Meals at Fancy Restaurants.

1980: Arthur, the cat food commercial cat, is wined and dined at a fancy restaurant.

They Get Behind the Wheel.

1933: A cat and a bulldog in a toy car.

They sing, too!

1926: Mr Macfrisco, the singing sea lion, has a singing lesson.

They Celebrate Birthdays...

August 1977: A twenty-seven year old cat celebrates her birthday, an age equivalent to 189 in human terms.

...And Go Window Shopping.

American silent film actress Phyllis Gordon (1889 - 1964) window-shopping in Earls Court, London with her four-year-old cheetah who was flown to Britain from Kenya.

They Strike a Pose.

June 1956: Members of the Malayan Police Band Bachan Singh and Abdul Rahman, due to appear at the Royal Tournament, visit London Zoo and make friends with Anabella the Orang-Outang.

They Do Laundry.

September 1933: A cat hangs a row of tame rats on the washing line to dry.

They Need an Annual Checkup from a Good Doctor. 

A zoo vet holding an iguana, circa 1956.

They go tanning.

January 1938: A piglet which is being treated by the PDSA (People's Dispensary for Animals) in Ilford with a sun ray lamp, to cure a skin ailment.

They Wear Glasses...

1925: Film actress Fay Webb with her pet goose, which is wearing an attractive pair of glasses.

...And Use Weapons.

1956: "Carrots" the rabbit fires table tennis balls from a toy cannon.

And hey—they write, too!

1955: A woman teaching her kangaroo to type.

All photos courtesy of Getty Images.

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Bleat Along to Classic Holiday Tunes With This Goat Christmas Album
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Feeling a little Grinchy this month? The Sweden branch of ActionAid, an international charity dedicated to fighting global poverty, wants to goat—errr ... goad—you into the Christmas spirit with their animal-focused holiday album: All I Want for Christmas is a Goat.

Fittingly, it features the shriek-filled vocal stylings of a group of festive farm animals bleating out classics like “Jingle Bells,” “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” and “O Come All Ye Faithful.” The recording may sound like a silly novelty release, but there's a serious cause behind it: It’s intended to remind listeners how the animals benefit impoverished communities. Goats can live in arid nations that are too dry for farming, and they provide their owners with milk and wool. In fact, the only thing they can't seem to do is, well, sing. 

You can purchase All I Want for Christmas is a Goat on iTunes and Spotify, or listen to a few songs from its eight-track selection below.

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Animals
If You Want Your Cat to Poop Out More Hairballs, Try Feeding It Beets
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Have you ever wondered if there’s a way to get your cat to poop out its hairballs instead of hacking them up? If so, you’re likely a seasoned cat owner whose tolerance for gross stuff has reached the point of no return. Luckily, there may be an easy way to get your cat to dispose of hairballs in the litter box instead of on your carpet, according to one study.

The paper, published in the Journal of Physiology and Animal Nutrition, followed the diets of 18 mixed-breed short-haired cats over a month. Some cats were fed straight kibble, while others were given helpings of beet pulp along with their regular meals. The researchers suspected that beets, a good source of fiber, would help move any ingested hair through the cats’ digestive systems, thus preventing it from coming back up the way it went in. Following the experiment, they found that the cats with the beet diet did indeed poop more.

The scientists didn’t measure how many hairballs the cats were coughing up during this period, so it's possible that pooping out more of them didn’t stop cats from puking them up at the same rate. But considering hairballs are a matter of digestive health, more regular bowel movements likely reduced the chance that cats would barf them up. The cat body is equipped to process large amounts of hair: According to experts, healthy cats should only be hacking hairballs once or twice a year.

If you find them around your home more frequently than that, it's a good idea to up your cat's fiber intake. Raw beet pulp is just one way to introduce fiber into your pet's diet; certain supplements for cats work just as well and actually contain beet pulp as a fiber source. Stephanie Liff, a veterinarian at Pure Paws Veterinary Care in New York, recommends psyllium powder to her patients. Another option for dealing with hairballs is the vegetable-oil based digestive lubricant Laxatone: According to Dr. Liff, this can "help to move hairballs in the correct direction."

[h/t Discover]

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