Weekend Links: Pretty Kitties

These cats that look like pin-up girls are some saucy felines. Safe for work, unless your boss is really particular about cats.

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Renowned TV presenter, mental_floss contributor, and culinary know-it-all Alton Brown writes all of his tweets on Post-It notes (often illustrating them), takes a picture, and uploads the image to his feed. His collected works can be found at his Tumblr, Analog Tweets.

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The Ultimate Ferris Bueller Quiz is tough. I’ve seen the movie about half a dozen times, and I’m too embarrassed to tell you my score. I did know who Abe Froman was, though.

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This animated video imagines various wildlife settings in the hypothetical world that would exist “if animals ate fast food.” The roly-poly creatures are just ripe for stuffed plush toy adaptations.

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This guide to wedding-themed Barbies through the years features a surprisingly diverse-looking cast of dolls. Famous brides in history Elizabeth Taylor and Kate Middleton make special appearances, though Princess Di was never commemorated in Mattel plastic. Can you really be the People’s Princess without a miniature toy version of yourself?

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This gallery of some impeccably dressed dogs in New York (of course in New York) is to New York Fashion Week as the Puppy Bowl is to the Super Bowl: more fun and involves fewer shoulder pads.

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These awkward stock photos will remind you to be grateful that mental_floss employs such discerning, tasteful site editors.

If March 15 Is the Ides of March, What Does That Make March 16?

iStock.com/bycostello
iStock.com/bycostello

Everyone knows that the soothsayer in William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar was talking about March 15 when he warned the Roman emperor to "beware the Ides of March." We also all know Caesar's response: "Nah, I gotta head into the office that day." But if March 15 is the Ides of March, what does that make March 16?

At the time of Caesar's assassination, Romans were using the Julian calendar (introduced by Julius Caesar himself). This was a modified version of the original Roman calendar, and it is very similar to the one we use today (which is called the Gregorian calendar). A major difference, however, was how Romans talked about the days.

Each month had three important dates: the Kalends (first day of the month), the Ides (the middle of the month), and the Nones (ninth day before the Ides, which corresponded with the first phase of the Moon). Instead of counting up (i.e., March 10, March 11, March 12), Romans kept track by counting backwards and inclusively from the Kalends, Ides, or Nones. March 10 was the sixth day before the Ides of March, March 11 was the fifth day before the Ides of March, and so on.

Because it came after the Ides, March 16 would’ve been referred to in the context of April: "The 17th day before the Kalends of April." The abbreviated form of this was a.d. XVII Kal. Apr., with "a.d." standing for ante diem, meaning roughly "the day before."

So, had Julius Caesar been murdered on March 16, the soothsayer's ominous warning would have been, "Beware the 17th day before the Kalends of April." Doesn't have quite the same ring to it.

This story first ran in 2016.

Show Houseguests Who's in Charge With This Game of Thrones Doormat

ThinkGeek
ThinkGeek

If you’re prone to houseguests who shed crumbs on your sofa and use all the toilet paper without replacing it, it might be time to demand a little respect. This Game of Thrones doormat from the merchants at ThinkGeek offers some guidance. Emblazoned on the mat is an order to “bend the knee” before entering your home.

A doormat from the HBO series 'Game of Thrones' is pictured
ThinkGeek

The 17-inch long by 29-inch wide mat arrives in time for the eighth and final season of the popular HBO series, which is set to debut April 14. Chronicling the lives of disparate characters vying for control of the Iron Throne, the show has often depicted Daenerys Targaryen, also known as the Mother of Dragons and played by Emilia Clarke, ordering subjects to “bend the knee” before addressing her. In season seven, King in the North Jon Snow famously refused to do so before eventually capitulating. Had she laid out the doormat, it’s possible he wouldn’t have taken as long.

The mat retails for $24.99 and can be purchased online here.

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