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HookedOnHouses.net

6 Fictional Houses You Can Move Into

HookedOnHouses.net
HookedOnHouses.net

Most of us, at one point or another, have coveted a house that's not real. For me, it's the mansion from The Haunting, minus the haunting. While most of us will never realize those real estate dreams, there are a lucky few who have. Here are a few fictional houses you can really move into.

1. The Fredricksen house from Up

The modest but charming domicile Carl Fredricksen improbably flew to South America in Up isn’t in Paradise Falls—it’s in Utah. The house was constructed, with Disney’s permission, by Bangerter Homes.

Fittingly, the home was purchased by a couple of Disney fanatics who had been searching for a place with the Up flavor in California, but were having trouble finding something in their price range. Carl and Ellie’s house was a steal at $400,000. Added bonus: one of the basement bedrooms is decked out to look like Andy’s room from Toy Story. Sure, it's not canon, but it's cute!

Here are a ton of interior pics, including a kitchen that wasn’t actually in the movie but looks like it could have been. I want that fridge.

2. Barbie’s Dream House

If the Barbie girl from Ukraine ever decides she wants to invest in American real estate, I’ve got just the place for her. To celebrate Barbie’s 50th birthday in 2009, Mattel enlisted designer Jonathan Adler to help create a real-life Malibu beach house. If you buy it, I’m going to go ahead and suggest you replace the Barbie-hair chandelier and lamp pulls. But you do what you want.

Actually, the contents of the house were dismantled and some of it was made into a suite at the Palms hotel in Las Vegas, so while you can’t buy the furnished Dream House, you can still get the Barbie experience.

3. The Simpsons’ house

Gizmodo

As part of a 1997 promotion, Fox, Pepsi, and Kaufman and Broad homebuilders sponsored a contest that gave people the chance to win a fully-furnished Simpsons house. No detail was left out, from Duff beer cans to the print on the kitchen curtains.

The winner opted to take $75,000 in cash instead of the house, and Bart’s humble yet colorful abode was converted to a more-or-less normal living space (to the relief of the homeowners' association, no doubt) and sold in 2001, though fans with sharp eyes may still be able to spot the Treehouse of Terror in the backyard.

4. The Haunted Mansion

Not only does this house bear more than a passing resemblance to Disneyland’s plantation-style Haunted Mansion on the outside, it has a few ghostly surprises on the inside as well. A Disney contractor built this Duluth, Ga., house in 1996, but is now selling it to move on to more Disney-themed projects, such as a house themed after Disneyland’s Grand Californian hotel and a Hawaiian pool based on the Jungle Cruise.

Looks to me like the house is still listed, so if you’re looking for the ultimate souvenir and have a spare $873,000, look into it. Oh, and about those ghostly surprises:

5. Tron in Milan

Crave

To promote Tron: Legacy in 2011, Disney partnered with DuPont to make a Grid-inspired home in Milan that was on display during Milan Design Week. That's the kitchen in the picture, but you can also check out the "bathroom and wellness area" and a bedroom fit for a Flynn.

6. The Batcave

Elite Home Theater

Consider this an honorable mention, because it's not a full-sized house—but it's just as impressive. Elite Home Theaters constructed this 12,000 square foot home theater for a fan reportedly located in Greenwich, Conn. The theater, which cost $2 million, includes a secret room that houses the Batmobile, a Batcomputer and an "escape tunnel." No word on whether Alfred is included in the deal. The same company is apparently also working on a Pirates of the Caribbean home theater.

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The World’s 10 Most Beautiful Metro Stations
T-Centralen Station in Stockholm, Sweden
T-Centralen Station in Stockholm, Sweden

Some of the most beautiful places on earth lie just below the surface. For proof, look no further than T-Centralen in Stockholm, Sweden, which has just been named the most beautiful metro station in the world by Expedia.

The travel site used Google Trends to analyze the most-mentioned metro stations in the U.S. and Europe, but Expedia ultimately chose the order of its top 10 list and threw in a couple of other hidden gems. Russia and Sweden frequently popped up in their research, so it’s no surprise that stations in those countries secured the top two spots on Expedia's list.

Dubbed “the blue platform,” T-Centralen is the main station of Stockholm’s subway system, and it’s also one of the most ornate. Royal blue flowers and plant patterns creep up cave-like walls, and another section pays tribute to the workers who helped build the Metro. It has been suggested that the color blue was chosen to help commuters feel calmer as they go about their busy days.

A section of T-Centralen
iStock

It was the first station in Sweden to feature artwork, which stemmed from a 1956 competition to decorate the city’s metro stops. Over the years, more than 20 artists have contributed their work to various stations throughout the city, some of which have tackled important social and environmental themes like women’s rights, inclusivity, and deforestation.

In second place is Moscow’s Kosomolskaya Station, which also has an interesting origin story. When the Metro started operating in 1935, it was designed to help promote Soviet propaganda. Kosomolskaya Station, named for workers of the Komsomol youth league who helped build the first Metro line, had marble walls with gilded mosaics, crystal chandeliers, sculptures of fallen leaders, and painted scenes depicting important moments in Russian history. “Unlike the dirty, utilitarian systems of many cities around the world, the Moscow metro drives through a former—but not forgotten—stage of history that sought to bring palaces to the masses,” Expedia’s report states.

Komsomolskaya Station
Komsomolskaya Station in Moscow, Russia

Most of the stations on Expedia’s list are in Europe, but three are in the U.S., including two in New York City and one in Washington, D.C.

Here’s the full top 10 list:

1. T-Centralen Station (Stockholm, Sweden)
2. Kosomolskaya Station (Moscow, Russia)
3. Arts Et Métiers Station (Paris, France)
4. The Wesfriedhof Station (Munich, Germany)
5. Toledo Metro Station (Naples, Italy)
6. Staromestska Station (Prague, Czech Republic)
7. Metro Center Station (Washington, D.C, USA)
8. Mayakovskaya station (Moscow, Russia)
9. Abandoned City Hall Station (New York, USA)
10. New York City’s Grand Central Terminal (New York, USA)

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iStock
India's Supreme Court Demands That the Taj Mahal Be Restored or Demolished
iStock
iStock

The Taj Mahal is one of the most recognizable monuments on Earth, but over the years it's started to look less like its old self. Smog and insect droppings are staining the once pure-white marble exterior an unseemly shade of yellow. Now, The Art Newspaper reports that India's Supreme Court has set an ultimatum: It's threatening to shut down or demolish the building if it's not restored to its former glory.

Agra, the town where the Taj Mahal is located, has a notorious pollution problem. Automobile traffic, factory smoke, and the open burning of municipal waste have all contributed to the landmark's increasing discoloration. Insects and acid rain also pose a threat to the facade, which is already crumbling away in some parts.

India's highest court now says the country's central government must seek foreign assistance to restore the UNESCO World Heritage Site if it's to remain open. Agra's state of Uttar Pradesh has taken some steps to reduce pollution in recent years, such us banning the burning of cow dung, which produces heavy brown carbon. In 2015, India's Supreme Court ordered all wood-burning crematoriums near the Taj Mahal to be swapped for electric ones.

But the measures haven't done enough to preserve the building. A committee led by the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpu reportedly plans to investigate the exact sources of pollution in the area, a process that will take about four months. The Supreme Court plans check in on the status of site every day from July 31.

Air pollution isn't the only factor damaging the Taj Mahal. It was constructed near the Yamuna River in the 17th century, and as the water gradual dries up, the ground beneath the structure is shifting. If the trend continues it could lead to the building's total collapse.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

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