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6 Fictional Houses You Can Move Into

HookedOnHouses.net
HookedOnHouses.net

Most of us, at one point or another, have coveted a house that's not real. For me, it's the mansion from The Haunting, minus the haunting. While most of us will never realize those real estate dreams, there are a lucky few who have. Here are a few fictional houses you can really move into.

1. The Fredricksen house from Up

The modest but charming domicile Carl Fredricksen improbably flew to South America in Up isn’t in Paradise Falls—it’s in Utah. The house was constructed, with Disney’s permission, by Bangerter Homes.

Fittingly, the home was purchased by a couple of Disney fanatics who had been searching for a place with the Up flavor in California, but were having trouble finding something in their price range. Carl and Ellie’s house was a steal at $400,000. Added bonus: one of the basement bedrooms is decked out to look like Andy’s room from Toy Story. Sure, it's not canon, but it's cute!

Here are a ton of interior pics, including a kitchen that wasn’t actually in the movie but looks like it could have been. I want that fridge.

2. Barbie’s Dream House

If the Barbie girl from Ukraine ever decides she wants to invest in American real estate, I’ve got just the place for her. To celebrate Barbie’s 50th birthday in 2009, Mattel enlisted designer Jonathan Adler to help create a real-life Malibu beach house. If you buy it, I’m going to go ahead and suggest you replace the Barbie-hair chandelier and lamp pulls. But you do what you want.

Actually, the contents of the house were dismantled and some of it was made into a suite at the Palms hotel in Las Vegas, so while you can’t buy the furnished Dream House, you can still get the Barbie experience.

3. The Simpsons’ house

Gizmodo

As part of a 1997 promotion, Fox, Pepsi, and Kaufman and Broad homebuilders sponsored a contest that gave people the chance to win a fully-furnished Simpsons house. No detail was left out, from Duff beer cans to the print on the kitchen curtains.

The winner opted to take $75,000 in cash instead of the house, and Bart’s humble yet colorful abode was converted to a more-or-less normal living space (to the relief of the homeowners' association, no doubt) and sold in 2001, though fans with sharp eyes may still be able to spot the Treehouse of Terror in the backyard.

4. The Haunted Mansion

Not only does this house bear more than a passing resemblance to Disneyland’s plantation-style Haunted Mansion on the outside, it has a few ghostly surprises on the inside as well. A Disney contractor built this Duluth, Ga., house in 1996, but is now selling it to move on to more Disney-themed projects, such as a house themed after Disneyland’s Grand Californian hotel and a Hawaiian pool based on the Jungle Cruise.

Looks to me like the house is still listed, so if you’re looking for the ultimate souvenir and have a spare $873,000, look into it. Oh, and about those ghostly surprises:

5. Tron in Milan

Crave

To promote Tron: Legacy in 2011, Disney partnered with DuPont to make a Grid-inspired home in Milan that was on display during Milan Design Week. That's the kitchen in the picture, but you can also check out the "bathroom and wellness area" and a bedroom fit for a Flynn.

6. The Batcave

Elite Home Theater

Consider this an honorable mention, because it's not a full-sized house—but it's just as impressive. Elite Home Theaters constructed this 12,000 square foot home theater for a fan reportedly located in Greenwich, Conn. The theater, which cost $2 million, includes a secret room that houses the Batmobile, a Batcomputer and an "escape tunnel." No word on whether Alfred is included in the deal. The same company is apparently also working on a Pirates of the Caribbean home theater.

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History
The Secret World War II History Hidden in London's Fences

In South London, the remains of the UK’s World War II history are visible in an unlikely place—one that you might pass by regularly and never take a second look at. In a significant number of housing estates, the fences around the perimeter are actually upcycled medical stretchers from the war, as the design podcast 99% Invisible reports.

During the Blitz of 1940 and 1941, the UK’s Air Raid Precautions department worked to protect civilians from the bombings. The organization built 60,000 steel stretchers to carry injured people during attacks. The metal structures were designed to be easy to disinfect in case of a gas attack, but that design ended up making them perfect for reuse after the war.

Many London housing developments at the time had to remove their fences so that the metal could be used in the war effort, and once the war was over, they were looking to replace them. The London County Council came up with a solution that would benefit everyone: They repurposed the excess stretchers that the city no longer needed into residential railings.

You can tell a stretcher railing from a regular fence because of the curves in the poles at the top and bottom of the fence. They’re hand-holds, designed to make it easier to carry it.

Unfortunately, decades of being exposed to the elements have left some of these historic artifacts in poor shape, and some housing estates have removed them due to high levels of degradation. The Stretcher Railing Society is currently working to preserve these heritage pieces of London infrastructure.

As of right now, though, there are plenty of stretchers you can still find on the streets. If you're in the London area, this handy Google map shows where you can find the historic fencing.

[h/t 99% Invisible]

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Guillaume Souvant, Getty Images
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This Just In
For $61, You Can Become a Co-Owner of This 13th-Century French Castle
Guillaume Souvant, Getty Images
Guillaume Souvant, Getty Images

A cultural heritage restoration site recently invited people to buy a French castle for as little as $61. The only catch? You'll be co-owning it with thousands of other donors. Now thousands of shareholders are responsible for the fate of the Château de la Mothe-Chandeniers in western France, and there's still room for more people to participate.

According to Mashable, the dilapidated structure has a rich history. Since its construction in the 13th century, the castle has been invaded by foreign forces, looted, renovated, and devastated by a fire. Friends of Château de la Mothe-Chandeniers, a small foundation formed in 2016 in an effort to conserve the overgrown property, want to see the castle restored to its former glory.

Thanks to a crowdfunding collaboration with the cultural heritage restoration platform Dartagnans, the group is closer than ever to realizing its mission. More than 9000 web users have contributed €51 ($61) or more to the campaign to “adopt” Mothe-Chandeniers. Now that the original €500,000 goal has been fulfilled, the property’s new owners are responsible for deciding what to do with their purchase.

“We intend to create a dedicated platform that will allow each owner to monitor the progress of works, events, project proposals and build a real collaborative and participatory project,” the campaign page reads. “To make an abandoned ruin a collective work is the best way to protect it over time.”

Even though the initial goal has been met, Dartagnans will continue accepting funds for the project through December 25. Money collected between now and then will be used to pay for various fees related to the purchase of the site, and new donors will be added to the growing list of owners.

The shareholders will be among the first to see the cleared-out site during an initial visit next spring. The rest of the public will have to wait until it’s fully restored to see the final product.

[h/t Mashable]

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