CLOSE
Original image
Wikimedia Commons

Einstein's Design for a Fridge to Last 100 Years

Original image
Wikimedia Commons

After establishing the theory of relativity as a founding principle of modern physics, Albert Einstein turned his thoughts to higher matters: home appliances. In 1926, the Nobel Prize-winning scientist put his considerable mental energies towards developing the refrigerator to end all refrigerators—energy-efficient, environmentally friendly, and durable enough to last a century.

Einstein’s interest in consumer goods was initially piqued by a news story recounting the death of a family in Berlin from the poisonous fumes of their poorly sealed refrigerator—a danger which was growing increasingly prevalent as households exchanged their ice boxes for modern refrigerators containing volatile chemical coolants. He proposed a solution that avoided the use of deadly methyl chloride, ammonia, or sulfur dioxide, enlisting the aid and expertise of young Hungarian physicist, friend, and thermodynamics specialist Léo Szilàrd to draft a prototype of a safer, better “absorption refrigerator” instead.

In the traditional style of refrigerator, a mechanical compressor pressurizes potentially toxic gases to initiate the cooling process. So long as the fridge remains safely sealed, the risks to users are minimal, but a refrigerator’s moving parts often wear out its seal and expose its fatal contents to the air. Einstein and Szilàrd’s design would require no moving parts, instead using a heat source to naturally pressurize the gas contained within the series of circuits. With no immediate source of wear and tear, the Einstein-Szilàrd refrigerator would last as long as its external casing did—up to 100 years, experts estimate.

Over the course of their partnership, the two scientists took out 45 patents for refrigeration technology in six countries, eventually selling their key patents to appliance manufacturer AB Electro Lux. However, their design remained less efficient than compressor-type models, and the combined advent of the Great Depression’s effect on industrial budgets and the introduction of chlorofluorocarbons as less toxic chemical alternatives put an end to Einstein and Szilàrd’s domestic technology dreams—until a recent resurgence of interest by researchers at Oxford University, who have picked up on the idea of a fridge that can function without electricity or greenhouse gases as a green solution to our increased global dependence on cooling technologies. Though the remake of the original Einstein fridge has yet to make it to market, every kitchen might soon be keeping their drinks cold and their pie crusts chilled in Einstein’s new and improved brainchild.

Original image
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
arrow
Art
‘American Gothic’ Became Famous Because Many People Saw It as a Joke
Original image
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

In 1930, Iowan artist Grant Wood painted a simple portrait of a farmer and his wife (really his dentist and sister) standing solemnly in front of an all-American farmhouse. American Gothic has since inspired endless parodies and is regarded as one of the country’s most iconic works of art. But when it first came out, few people would have guessed it would become the classic it is today. Vox explains the painting’s unexpected path to fame in the latest installment of the new video series Overrated.

According to host Phil Edwards, American Gothic made a muted splash when it first hit the art scene. The work was awarded a third-place bronze medal in a contest at the Chicago Art Institute. When Wood sold the painting to the museum later on, he received just $300 for it. But the piece’s momentum didn’t stop there. It turned out that American Gothic’s debut at a time when urban and rural ideals were clashing helped it become the defining image of the era. The painting had something for everyone: Metropolitans like Gertrude Stein saw it as a satire of simple farm life in Middle America. Actual farmers and their families, on the other hand, welcomed it as celebration of their lifestyle and work ethic at a time when the Great Depression made it hard to take pride in anything.

Wood didn’t do much to clear up the work’s true meaning. He stated, "There is satire in it, but only as there is satire in any realistic statement. These are types of people I have known all my life. I tried to characterize them truthfully—to make them more like themselves than they were in actual life."

Rather than suffering from its ambiguity, American Gothic has been immortalized by it. The country has changed a lot in the past century, but the painting’s dual roles as a straight masterpiece and a format for skewering American culture still endure today.

Get the full story from Vox below.

[h/t Vox]

Original image
“Dissension” by Tobias Rothe. Original image courtesy Fondazione Federico Zeri/Università di Bologna // CC-BY 3.0
arrow
Art
Get Your GIFs Ready for This International Public Domain GIF-Making Competition
Original image
“Dissension” by Tobias Rothe. Original image courtesy Fondazione Federico Zeri/Università di Bologna // CC-BY 3.0

Excellent GIF-making skills can serve you beyond material for your clever tweets. Each year, a group of four digital libraries from across the world hosts GIF IT UP, a competition to find the best animated image sourced from public domain images from their archives.

The competition is sponsored by Europeana, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), New Zealand’s DigitalNZ, and the National Library of Australia’s Trove, all of which host millions of public domain works. The requirements are that the source material must be in the public domain, have a 'no known copyright restrictions' statement, or have a Creative Commons license that allows its reuse. The material must also come from one of the sponsored sources. Oh, and judging by the past winners, it helps if it’s a little whimsical.

The image above won the grand prize in 2015. And this was a runner-up in 2016:

via GIPHY

This year’s prizes haven’t been announced yet (although Europeana says there will be a new one for first-time GIF makers), but last year’s grand prize winner got their own Giphoscope, and runners-up got $20 gift cards. (Turns out, there’s not a lot of money in public domain art.)

Not an expert GIFer yet? You can always revisit the audio version of DPLA’s advanced GIF-making tutorial from last year.

The fourth-annual GIF IT UP contest opens to submissions October 1.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios