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Thinkstock (fish)/Getty Images (George Washington)

George Washington's Fishery

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Thinkstock (fish)/Getty Images (George Washington)

When we think of America’s first president, quarters, cherry trees, and false teeth often come to mind. But fishing?

Washington was, by all accounts, an accomplished and enthusiastic fisherman throughout most of his life (go here to see one of his original tackle boxes). As president, he’d often set sail and enjoy an afternoon of deep-sea fishing as he traveled about the new nation and even convinced notorious cabinet rivals Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton to accompany him on one such trip to Sandy Hook, New Jersey.

More than a mere hobbyist, however, Washington transformed part of his Mount Vernon home into a highly-profitable fishery. The neighboring banks of the Potomac River, he wrote in 1793, were “well-stocked with various kinds of fish in all seasons of the year, and in the Spring with shad, herring, bass, carp, perch, sturgeon, etc., in great abundance.”

Stationed on a section of the river dubbed “Posey’s landing,” the establishment processed nearly a million herring annually. In fact, Mount Vernon’s fishery usually yielded far more profits than the various crops (such as corn and wheat) raised there.

Originally intended to feed the plantation’s slaves, Washington eventually recognized an enviable business opportunity and began shipping barrels of salted fish to the West Indies, recruiting a small fleet of ships, including a schooner and whale boat, for the cause. By all accounts, the Mount Vernon brand quickly acquired a reputation for excellence worldwide.

Intriguingly, however, the business even helped to fuel Washington’s growing anti-British sentiments before the revolution. Imperial mercantile policies forbade him from importing fish-curing salt from Lisbon, leaving him no choice but to purchase inferior salts from Liverpool. During the war, he often drew upon his extensive connections with fishermen throughout the colonies to provide food for the starving troops. Unfortunately, in the words of historians William J. Mares and Bill Mares, “the record shows that the troops responded to fish with as much enthusiasm as George Bush would greet broccoli. They held out for beef, which eventually came.” 

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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iStock

If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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