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Vestron Video

How to Beat Home Video Games (in 1982)

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Vestron Video
In 1982, Vestron Video released a series of "professional lessons in mastering home video games" on VHS. How to Beat Home Video Games is an 80s-tastic guide to just what it sounds like; released in three volumes, each tape covered an hour's worth of detailed hints and tricks about the biggest hits of the day. It's wildly retro, and actually quite useful -- if you're hoping to master Atari 2600, Vectrex, or Colecovision games. And how's this for irony: many of these games are actually unbeatable (they end with the player dying, always), so the title of the series is inaccurate at best. But still, dive in. Oh, and while we normally bring you five movies each night, I figured three one-hour movies was good enough for one gloriously wasted evening.

Volume I: The Best Games

Atari 2600 all the way, dudes. Includes: Space Invaders, Demon Attack, Space Cavern, Missile Command, Atlantis, Cosmic Ark, Asteroids, Yar's Revenge, Defender, Chopper Command, Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, Stampede, Barnstorming, Kaboom!, Breakout, Warlords, Circus Atari, Frogger, Donkey Kong, Pac-Man. Okay, Atari 2600 fans. Did you know the "double-shot" bug in Space Invaders, invoked by holding down the Reset button on launch?

Volume II: The Hot New Games

Featuring yet more Atari 2600 titles. Includes: E.T., Raiders of the Lost Ark, Megamania, Astroblast, Encounter at L-5, Star Master, Space Attack, Planet Patrol, Nexar, Berzerk, Dark Cavern, Venture, Pitfall, Riddle of the Sphynx, Shark Attack, Mouse Trap, Lock N Chase, Tapeworm, Lost Luggage, Super Breakout, Demons to Diamonds, Gangster Alley. "Most of these games are so new that strategies for beating them haven't been published before now!" -Spoken just before we see shots of E.T. and Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Volume III: Arcade Quality For The Home

This one finally has Atari 5200, Vectrex, and Colecovision titles (the Vectrex stuff is totally awesome). Featuring: Mine Storm, Hyperchase, Clean Sweep, Rip-Off, Berzerk, Cosmic Chasm, Scramble, Venture, Cosmic Avenger, Donkey Kong, Zaxxon, Lady Bug, Smurf, Pac-Man, Centipede, Defender, Galaxian, Super Breakout, Star Raiders, Space Invaders.
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Habibou Kouyate, Stringer, Getty Images
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science
Play a Game to Help Scientists Defeat a Cancer-Causing Toxin
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Habibou Kouyate, Stringer, Getty Images

If you're used to fighting virtual zombies or flying spaceships on your computer, a new series of games available on Foldit may sound a little unconventional. The object of the Aflatoxin Challenge is to rearrange protein structures and create new enzymes. But its impact on the real world could make it the most important game you've ever played: The scientists behind it hope it will lead to a new way to fight one of the most ruthless causes of liver cancer.

As Fast Company reports, the citizen science project is a collaboration between Mars, Inc. and U.C. Davis, the University of Washington, the Partnership for Aflatoxin Control in Africa, and Thermo Fisher Scientific. The team's online puzzles, which debuted on Foldit earlier this month, invite the public to create a new enzyme capable of finding and destroying carcinogens known as aflatoxins.

Aflatoxins form when certain fungi grow on crops like corn, nuts, and grains. Developing countries often don't have the resources to detect it in food, leaving around 4.5 billion people vulnerable to it. When people do eat food with high aflatoxin levels unknowingly, they can contract liver cancer. Roughly a quarter of all liver cancer cases around the world can be traced back to aflatoxin exposure.

The toxin's connection to agriculture is why the food giant Mars is so interested in fighting it. By working on a way to stop aflatoxins on a molecular level, the company could prevent its spread more efficiently than they would with less direct methods like planting drought-resistant crops or removing mold by hand.

The easiest way for scientists to eradicate an aflatoxin before it causes real harm is by making an enzyme that does the work for them. With the Aflatoxin Challenge, the hope is that by manipulating protein structures, online players will come up with an enzyme that attacks aflatoxins at a susceptible portion of their molecular structure called a lactone ring. Destroying the lactone ring makes aflatoxin much less toxic and essentially safe to eat.

The University of Washington launched Foldit in 2008. Since then, the online puzzle platform has been used to study a wide range of diseases including AIDS and Chikungunya. Everyone is welcome to contribute to the Foldit's new aflatoxin project for the next several weeks or so, after which scientists will synthesize genes based on the most impressive results to be used in future studies.

[h/t Fast Company]

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Nervous System
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Art
Every Laser-Cut 'Geode' Jigsaw Puzzle is One of a Kind
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Nervous System

If you haven’t picked up a boxed jigsaw puzzle in a while, trust that they’ve undergone a serious transformation since your childhood. One of the most innovative companies in the category is Nervous System, a self-described “generative design studio” that composes computer programs to create puzzles based on patterns found in nature.

Their latest project, Geode, is a line of jigsaw puzzles modeled after agate stone. Like the rest of Nervous System’s puzzle inventory, it has an unusual and dynamic design; it's meant to mimic the band pattern of actual agate created by trapped gas in volcanic stone.

Several geode puzzles are shown
Nervous System

According to Nervous System’s site: “To create the organic shape of the pieces, we designed a system based the simulation of dendritic solidification, a crystal growth process similar to the formation of snowflakes that occurs in supercooled solutions of certain metallic alloys. By varying the parameter space, the system can produce a variety of cut styles. Each puzzle produced features its own unique landscape of interlocking shapes. No two are alike.”

Though lovely to look at, the puzzles utilize Nervous System's "Maze" piece-cutting method, which results in irregular and distorted shapes that may prove "fiendishly difficult" for some.

The 8.5-inch puzzles are made from plywood and feature 180 pieces. You can grab one for $60 at Nervous System’s online shop.

[h/t MyModernMet]

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