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Could A Coconut Save Your Life?

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Coconuts are one of those divisive foods that people tend to love or hate, but if you ever get stranded in a tropical paradise, a coconut could just save your skin—even if you refuse to eat it. That's because the liquid inside of a coconut is both sterile and perhaps the best naturally-occuring version of IV fluid known to mankind. That means if you end up living out the premise of Lost or Gilligan's Island and one of your party becomes severely dehydrated, you could use a needle, plastic tubing and a coconut to provide them with the fluids they would need to survive.

Obviously going to a hospital and using real IV fluid is preferable, particularly since some doctors worry that long-term use of coconut water as IV fluid would result in a potassium overdose. But if you're stranded, it could mean the difference between life and death.

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environment
How Overfishing Threatens the World's Oceans—and What We Can Do About It
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Fish populations around the globe are in serious trouble, thanks to the modern fishing industry. Instead of simply using poles and intuition, factory ships employ radar, sonar, helicopters, and even spotter planes to hunt down schools of fish, which they catch using massive nets and lines studded with hundreds of hooks. These technologies allow us to snare all kinds of deep-water delicacies—but they come with an ecological cost, according to TED-Ed’s video below.

Learn how overfishing harms the environment—and what we can do to protect our oceans—by listening to marine biologist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and environmental studies scholar Jennifer Jacquet’s lesson below.

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environment
Nearly 100 Volcanoes Discovered Under Antarctic Ice Sheet
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We’re used to the ocean depths holding a significant number of surprises, but not all of us stop to think about what might be lurking under the thick sheet of ice covering real estate in the Antarctic.

One recent revelation: volcanoes. A lot of them.

Research recently published in Geological Society indicates that 91 newly discovered volcanoes are buried in West Antarctica. Scientists had already identified 47, so the sharp uptick makes for one of the largest concentrations of the formations in the world. The volcanoes were found in the West Antarctic Rift System, a 2200-mile long stretch housing volcanoes as small as 326 feet to as large as 12,600 feet—all completely encased under the ice.

The discovery was unearthed by researchers at the University of Edinburgh, where a third-year student suggested the study after examining radar maps of the region and finding evidence of volcanism. The underside of the ice was surveyed for basalt rock; radar detected the volcanoes' sizes and locations.The finding is significant, as the thick ice sheet makes spotting and identifying geological formations difficult.

It’s not currently known which of these volcanoes, if any, might be active or whether they could exacerbate the effects of climate change in the area by melting the underside of the ice sheet, causing it to become unstable. For that reason, finding out their status is considered urgent. Glacier expert Robert Bingham told The Guardian that the potential for eruption is "something we need to determine as quickly as possible."

[h/t Gizmodo]

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