The U.S. Military's Idiotic Idea for a Gay Bomb

Dan Lewis runs the popular daily newsletter Now I Know ("Learn Something New Every Day, By Email"). To subscribe to his daily email, click here.

The United States military leaves no stone unturned when looking for technological solutions to winning in the theater of war. The Manhattan Project in World War II is one of the more well-known examples, but American military history is rife with others. An esoteric one: During the American Revolution, inventor David Bushell came up with an idea to fight against the British blockade of American ports—a device we now call the submarine. But some of these ideas were more lunacy than science. A top example? The gay bomb.

In 1994, the Wright Laboratory—part of the U.S. Air Force—investigated the possibility of using pheromones as a weapon against enemy troops. Specifically, the proposal requested a six year, $7.5 million grant to see if dousing enemy combatants en masse with female pheromones would cause a biological reaction among the troops. Ideally, the three-page proposal suggested, the affected soldiers would find their brothers-in-arms “sexually irresistible” (per the BBC) and, per Fox News, noted that “[o]ne distasteful but completely non-lethal example would be strong aphrodisiacs, especially if the chemical also caused homosexual behavior.” The weapon colloquially took on the “gay bomb” moniker shortly after being discovered by a military spending watchdog group via a Freedom of Information Act request.

Wright Laboratory (now defunct, but not for the above) never received the funding for further study.

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Even Marvel Studios's Co-President is Confused by Avengers 4 Teaser Photo

Marvel Studios
Marvel Studios

​by Kwadar Ray

Marvel fans have been left baffled ​by a teaser photo the Russo Brothers released, which possibly has the name of the new Avengers movie hidden in the picture.

The photo shows co-director Joe Russo sitting on an empty stage while working on his laptop, with the caption, "Look hard ..."

Fans have been speculating the past few days on what the hidden message in the photo is and what it reveals.

​​Turns out, fans are not the only ones playing "Where's Waldo," as even Marvel Studios's co-president Louis D’Esposito cannot even figure out what he's supposed to be looking at. 

D'Esposito expressed his confusion in a hilarious tweet, which also reveals he's being left in the dark by the directors.

We do not know for sure what we're looking hard for. A majority of fans are assuming it's the title of the movie—especially since the ​Russo Brothers said the name will be revealed after the Captain Marvel trailer was released—but it may also be a hint to the story or something else. ​​

Perhaps, it's the rocket engine prop in the photo that also featured in Infinity War.

Nevertheless, everything will be revealed soon when Avengers 4 hits theaters on May 3, 2019, and when all the promo for it begins (which will hopefully be soon).

First Venom Clip Features Tom Hardy and Riz Ahmed

Marvel Entertainment
Marvel Entertainment

​by Kwadar Ray

Venom is making its solo debut when the movie hits theaters on October 5, 2018. Fans have been anxiously anticipating further footage from the movie after ​its trailer was released in April. Now, IGN has released a clip featuring Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy) and Dr. Carlton Drake (Riz Ahmed) in a heated confrontation.

As the clip shows, the conversation is cordial until Brock, a.k.a. Venom, gets into some of the allegations against the Life Foundation and their deadly pharmaceutical tests.

Drake and his team immediately shut down the interview. The clip ends with Brock being shoved away from Drake as he asks him if he's being threatened; Drake responds with a cryptic, "Have a nice life!"

Of course, the clip is significant because Brock has been obsessed with taking down Carlton Drake. Brock seems to be having a hard time cracking the story, and as his investigation starts to ruin his personal and journalistic life, he discovers and ultimately merges with the Venom symbiote.

Even though Venom would traditionally be considered the villain in a Spider-Man film, Ahmed's character will be even more villainous as an evil corrupt scientist.

And while Venom has ​a PG-13 rating, the movie is expected to be incredibly violent, with more than one decapitation rumored.

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