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Omote 3-D

6 Crazy Things You Can Make with 3D Printers

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Omote 3-D

Printing your movie ticket or boarding pass is nice, but what if you could print an action figure of yourself? Or print a new cell phone antenna? Or a protein cage to trap individual living cells?

You can—if you can afford the right equipment.

"Printing" technology has quietly evolved over the past few decades to allow users to create—on demand, from files—everything from gun parts to DNA. Here are six examples.

1. Print a Pose(able)

Harvard researcher Moritz Bacher developed an algorithm that should induce glee in children and adult hobbyists alike. His code takes any video game avatar and turns it into an instant, poseable action figure. Pick your avatar, click print, and the algorithm figures out what kinds of joints should go where. This opens two possibilities. First, it lets World of Warcraft players get poseables of their in-game characters. Second, it lets kids build their own, custom action figures.

2. Scrawling Circuits


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If you happen across one of Dimatix Fujifilm’s printers and it’s building a metallic pattern on a sheet of plastic, it just might be a cell phone antenna—or, really, any kind of circuit. The system uses metals in suspended solution to print just about any kind of circuit you need. Customers use the Dimatix printer for rapid prototyping.

3. Mini-me (or you!)

Remember those photo booths people visited before everyone had a camera-enabled cell phone? The Omote 3-D does them one better. The booth combines a 3D scanner with a 3D printer to xerox its customers. Pay your money, step inside and choose a pose. Moments later, the machine produces a tiny, full-color statue of you.

4. Tiny Cages

Yes, any 3D printer can build a cage, but NanoInk Inc. sells a system that can print with individual proteins. The system lines up the molecular chains to build microscopic cages to hold individual living cells. Why would anyone do that? Ruby Lam, a scientist with the company, said that researchers pen off the cells so that they can test chemicals and medications without worrying about cell-to-cell interactions.

5. Pre-medicated implants

Human bodies have an irritating habit of rejecting things you put in them. Uncle Joe may really need that stent to keep his artery open, but his body doesn’t want to play nice. Doctors usually respond to this problem with immunosuppressants, but they have the downside of, well, suppressing the immune system. MicroFab Technologies Inc. has a printer that solves that problem. Their system can print tiny 3D structures with just about any kind of material you like. This has allowed them to print a stent with embedded medicine that prevents rejection locally, without wrecking the rest of Uncle Joe’s body.

6. Print Life

For years, scientists have demonstrated their ability to manipulate things on a small scale, but researchers can now print with DNA. Harvard researcher George Church showed off what he’s capable of last year by printing a draft of his book in DNA. Not long after that, bio entrepreneur Craig Venter announced that his company is working on a printer that could print vaccines on demand.

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Here's What You Need to Know Before Getting Inked or Pierced, According to Doctors
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Getting inked or pierced is a rite of passage for many teens and young adults. But before getting that belly ring or butterfly on your back, experts want you to be aware of the risks, which are reviewed in a new clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). According to NPR, it's the first set of recommendations the professional association has ever released on the practices.

Forthcoming in the October 2017 issue of Pediatrics and available online, the report provides a general assessment of the types and methods used to perform body modifications, along with potential health and social consequences. Here are a few main takeaways:

—It's unclear how often tattoos cause health complications, but they're generally believed to be rare, with the greatest risk being infection. One recent study found that nanoparticles in ink can travel to and linger in lymph nodes for an extended period. That said, you should check with your doctor to make sure all of your immunizations are up to date before getting either a tattoo or piercing, and that you're not taking any immunity-compromising medicines.

—Before shelling out your hard-earned cash on a tattoo, make sure it's something you'll likely still appreciate in five to 10 years, as it costs anywhere from $49 to $300 per square inch to remove a tattoo with lasers. (This might provide all the more incentive to opt for a small design instead of a full sleeve.)

—About half of people 18 to 29 years of age have some kind of piercing or tattoo, according to Dr. Cora Breuner, who is chair of the AAP committee on adolescence. Many individuals don't regret getting one, with some reporting that tattoos make them feel sexier. But while millennials appear to be cool with metal and ink, hiring managers might not be too pleased: In a 2014 survey of 2700 people, 76 percent said they thought a tattoo or piercing had hindered their chances of getting hired, and nearly 40 percent thought tattooed employees reflected poorly on their employers.

—Not all tattoo parlors are created equal, as each state has different regulations. Keep a close eye on whether your artist uses fresh disposable gloves, fresh needles, and unused ink poured into a new container. This helps prevent infection.

—The advice is similar for getting pierced: Make sure the piercer puts on new, disposable gloves and uses new equipment from a sterile container. Tongue piercings can cause tooth chippings, so be careful of that—and remove any piercings before you play contacts sports.

The full report is available online.

[h/t NPR]

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The Body
7 Essential Facts About the Pelvis
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The human body is an amazing thing. For each one of us, it’s the most intimate object we know. And yet most of us don’t know enough about it: its features, functions, quirks, and mysteries. Our series The Body explores human anatomy, part by part. Think of it as a mini digital encyclopedia with a dose of wow.

The pelvis, which crooner Elvis was famous for thrusting around in ways that raised eyebrows, is not actually a single body part but a term that refers to a collection of bones, muscles and organs below the waist. We spoke to Katherine Gillogley, department chair of obstetrics and gynecology with Mercy Medical Group in Sacramento, California, for these seven facts about the pelvis.

1. SO WHAT IS THE PELVIS, EXACTLY?

"The pelvis refers to the lower abdominal area in both men and women," Gillogley says. "An important function of the pelvis region is to protect organs used for digestion and reproduction, though all its functions are crucial," she says. It protects the bladder, both large and small intestines, and male and female reproductive organs. Another key role is to support the hip joints.

2. THE PELVIC BONES FORM A BASIN.

Four bones come together to form a bowl-like shape, or basin: the two hip bones, the sacrum (the triangle-shaped bone at the low back) and the coccyx (also known as the tailbone).

3. YOUR PELVIC FLOOR IS LIKE A TRAMPOLINE.

At the bottom of the pelvis lies your pelvic floor. You don't have to worry about sweeping it, but you might want to do Kegel exercises to keep it strong. The pelvic floor is like a "mini-trampoline made of firm muscle," according the Continence Foundation of Australia. Just like a trampoline, the pelvic floor is flexible and can move up and down. It also creates a surface (floor) for the pelvic organs to lie upon: the bladder, uterus, and bowels. It has holes, too, for vagina, urethra, and anus to pass through.

4. IT PLAYS A KEY PART IN WALKING.

Anyone who has ever broken a pelvic bone or pulled a pelvic muscle will know just how key a role the pelvis plays in such functions as walking and standing. "The pelvis also acts as a solid foundation for the attachment of the spinal column and legs," says Gillogley.

5. THE FEMALE PELVIS STARTS OUT LARGER, BUT NARROWS OVER TIME.

Gillogley says that the female pelvis "tends to be larger and wider" than the male, most likely to accommodate a baby during pregnancy and to make childbirth possible. However, women's pelvises narrow as they age, suggesting that they start out wider to accommodate childbearing and then shift when that is no longer necessary. A shifting pelvis shape is thought to be a key part of our evolutionary history, as it changed as when we began walking upright.    

6. PREGNANCY CHANGES THE PELVIS FOREVER.

During pregnancy the body secretes a hormone known as relaxin to help the body accommodate the growing baby and soften the cervix. However, what happens is, "the joints between the pelvic bones actually loosen and slightly separate during pregnancy and childbirth," Gillogley says. Sometimes, however, relaxin can make the joints too loose, causing a painful syndrome known as symphysis pubis dysfunction (SPD), causing the pelvic joint to become unstable, causing pain and weakness in the pelvis, perineum and even upper thighs during walking and other activities. Many women with the condition have to wear a pelvic belt. It usually resolves after pregnancy is over, though physical therapy may be necessary.

7. IT'S ACCIDENT PRONE.

According to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, about 8 to 9 percent of blunt trauma includes pelvic injury, Gillogley says. "These accidents include falls, motor vehicle crashes, bicycle accidents, and pedestrians being struck by moving vehicles. With these serious injuries, pelvic bones can fracture or dislocate and sometimes bladder injury even occurs." So take care with your pelvis—in worse-case scenarios, breaks of the pelvic bones can require pins, rods, and surgery to fix.

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