CLOSE
Original image
Discovery Channel

How Scientists Captured the First-Ever Video of a Giant Squid

Original image
Discovery Channel

Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster are cool and all, but in Dr. Edie Widder’s opinion, there’s no animal more appropriate for science fiction than the real life giant squid. “You couldn’t ask for a better alien,” she says. “An animal with multiple arms and two long tentacles, the most enormous eyes, three hearts that pump blue blood, suckers with serrated edges, and a beak that slices flesh. And it happens to be real!”

A featured creature in mythology (the Kracken from Norse legends and Greek mythology), literature (20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, among others), and old sailor’s tales, the giant squid—which can grow up to 40 feet long—has proved elusive for scientists to find: The only way researchers could study the beasts was by examining carcasses that washed up on beaches and tentacles snared by fishermen. Although one was photographed in its natural habitat in 2004, attempts to film the beast have failed. Until now.

Last summer, Widder—who is co-founder, CEO, and Senior Scientist at the Ocean Research & Conservation Association—was part of a team of scientists that filmed the giant squid in its natural habitat for the first time ever. The historic footage airs on Curiosity this Sunday, January 27, on the Discovery Channel. “The giant squid has been an enigma,” Widder tells mental_floss. “To finally have this kind of imagery of it is so exciting.”

Finding the Giant

Widder joined the team—which also included marine biologist Steve O’Shea and zoologist Dr. Tsunemi Kobodera of the National Science Museum of Japan—in 2010, after Mike deGruy heard a TED talk she gave about an optical lure she had invented. The lure, on its first deployment in the Gulf of Mexico, attracted a deep sea squid so new to science it can’t be placed in any existing family. “He just got so excited,” Widder says. “‘Can’t we use these techniques to go after the giant squid?’” (Sadly, deGruy died in a helicopter crash in 2012.)

The system is comprised of an optical lure called the Electronic Jelly (or EJelly) that mimics the pinwheel light display of a jellyfish under attack. Attached to the lure is a gadget called the Medusa, a highly sensitive camera and far red lights (which are invisible to most sea creatures—they can only see greens and blues) within a waterproof housing. Thanks to her success on the system’s first deployment and during an eight-month run in Monterey Bay, Widder thought that the EJelly and the Medusa might just be the right tools for catching a glimpse of the giant squid in its natural habitat. “Giant squid are visual predators—you don’t have eyes the size of a human head unless it’s important to your survival,” she says. “I’ve spent a lot of time in submersibles thinking about what animals must face for survival in dimly lit environments. There’s an enormous volume in which to find food. An awful lot of these animals are bioluminescent, and it’s clear from the work I’ve done that bioluminescence doesn’t happen spontaneously—it’s usually stimulated by some kind of interaction, frequently predatory interactions. So it would make sense that a visual predator would be on the lookout all the time for a flash of light to find something that’s worth feeding on—not the jellyfish, but what’s eating the jellyfish.”

Finding the squid was all about location: The crew headed to the deep seas off Chichi island, Japan. "That was the doing of Dr. Kobodera," Widder says. "He had done a tremendous amount of work in that area. We knew that's where sperm whales come to feed, and fishermen had snagged tentacles from the squid there. So there was a lot of interest in going to that spot." And it also took a lot of patience; the scientists made hundreds of dives in a submersible, sometimes to deeper than 3000 feet.

The Moment of Truth

When a storm was rolling in, Widder placed the system on the ocean bottom and left it there for 30 hours while the ship returned to port. When they reviewed the footage (Widder was in the submersible, so grad student Wen-Sung Schung was checking the video), bam: There was a giant squid. “It really, really worked,” Widder says. “We had five separate sightings with the Medusa.”

Discovery Channel

Later, Kobodera and a team went down in the submersible with bait and a different optical lure and captured more than 20 minutes of high-definition video of a giant squid as it fed on the bait. “Nothing can top that high res video,” Widder says. “To have that eye looking back at you like that…it’s just incredible footage.”

This mission, which was funded by the Discovery Channel and the Japanese Broadcasting Commission (NHK), succeeded where so many others had failed thanks to one important thing. “We paid attention to the squid’s visual system,” Widder says. “All previous expeditions have used bright lights and noisy platforms. ROVs have their place, but I don’t think they’re good tools for exploring animal life in the ocean. There’s a tremendous amount of noise, and you don’t have the range of vision that you do from a submersible. That really shouldn’t be ignored when you’re trying to explore such a big space. And using optical lures instead of just using bait had huge impact.”

The scientists plan to go back and review the footage they filmed, but Widder says they’ve already learned a lot—and much of it surprised them. “The appearance of the squid was so different that what we had imagined given dead specimens,” she says. “And the eye—there was something looking back at you. It wasn’t a blank, dead eye. And it was very exciting that when it attacked, it didn’t go directly to the optical lure but to what was next to the optical lure.”

But the most important takeaway, she says, is that there’s still more of the ocean to explore, and what we find there could lead to a myriad of advancements, including a cure for cancer. “What else is down there that we haven’t discovered?” she wonders. “Why spend billions of dollars on space exploration when we haven’t explored our own planet?” Her hope is that this latest discovery will lead to more funding that will allow scientists to go on more expeditions—and not just in search of the giant squid. “It would be wonderful to man an expedition like that to find the colossal squid,” she says. “That might be even more exciting. It’s not longer, but it’s bigger by weight, more massive, and bioluminescent. My fascination is with animals that make light.”

"Monster Squid: The Giant is Real" premieres January 27 at 8pm ET/PT on the Discovery Channel as the season finale of Curiosity.

Original image
Netflix
arrow
entertainment
5 Things We Know About Stranger Things Season 2
Original image
Netflix

Stranger Things seemed to come out of nowhere to become one of television's standout new series in 2016. Netflix's sometimes scary, sometimes funny, and always exciting homage to '80s pop culture was a binge-worthy phenomenon when it debuted in July 2016. Of course, the streaming giant wasn't going to wait long to bring more Stranger Things to audiences, and a second season was announced a little over a month after its debut—and Netflix just announced that we'll be getting it a few days earlier than expected. Here are five key things we know about the show's sophomore season, which kicks off on October 27.

1. WE'LL BE GETTING EVEN MORE EPISODES.

The first season of Stranger Things consisted of eight hour-long episodes, which proved to be a solid length for the story Matt and Ross Duffer wanted to tell. While season two won't increase in length dramatically, we will be getting at least one extra hour when the show returns in 2017 with nine episodes. Not much is known about any of these episodes, but we do know the titles:

"Madmax"
"The Boy Who Came Back To Life"
"The Pumpkin Patch"
"The Palace"
"The Storm"
"The Pollywog"
"The Secret Cabin"
"The Brain"
"The Lost Brother"

There's a lot of speculation about what each title means and, as usual with Stranger Things, there's probably a reason for each one.

2. THE KIDS ARE RETURNING (INCLUDING ELEVEN).

Stranger Things fans should gear up for plenty of new developments in season two, but that doesn't mean your favorite characters aren't returning. A November 4 photo sent out by the show's Twitter account revealed most of the kids from the first season will be back in 2017, including the enigmatic Eleven, played by Millie Bobby Brown (the #elevenisback hashtag used by series regular Finn Wolfhard should really drive the point home):

3. THE SHOW'S 1984 SETTING WILL LEAD TO A DARKER TONE.

A year will have passed between the first and second seasons of the show, allowing the Duffer brothers to catch up with a familiar cast of characters that has matured since we last saw them. With the story taking place in 1984, the brothers are looking at the pop culture zeitgeist at the time for inspiration—most notably the darker tone of blockbusters like Gremlins and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

"I actually really love Temple of Doom, I love that it gets a little darker and weirder from Raiders, I like that it feels very different than Raiders did," Matt Duffer told IGN. "Even though it was probably slammed at the time—obviously now people look back on it fondly, but it messed up a lot of kids, and I love that about that film—that it really traumatized some children. Not saying that we want to traumatize children, just that we want to get a little darker and weirder."

4. IT'S NOT SO MUCH A CONTINUATION AS IT IS A SEQUEL.

When you watch something like The Americans season two, it's almost impossible to catch on unless you've seen the previous episodes. Stranger Things season two will differ from the modern TV approach by being more of a sequel than a continuation of the first year. That means a more self-contained plot that doesn't leave viewers hanging at the end of nine episodes.

"There are lingering questions, but the idea with Season 2 is there's a new tension and the goal is can the characters resolve that tension by the end," Ross Duffer told IGN. "So it's going to be its own sort of complete little movie, very much in the way that Season 1 is."

Don't worry about the two seasons of Stranger Things being too similar or too different from the original, though, because when speaking with Entertainment Weekly about the influences on the show, Matt Duffer said, "I guess a lot of this is James Cameron. But he’s brilliant. And I think one of the reasons his sequels are as successful as they are is he makes them feel very different without losing what we loved about the original. So I think we kinda looked to him and what he does and tried to capture a little bit of the magic of his work.”

5. THE PREMIERE WILL TRAVEL OUTSIDE OF HAWKINS.

Everything about the new Stranger Things episodes will be kept secret until they finally debut later this year, but we do know one thing about the premiere: It won't take place entirely in the familiar town of Hawkins, Indiana. “We will venture a little bit outside of Hawkins,” Matt Duffer told Entertainment Weekly. “I will say the opening scene [of the premiere] does not take place in Hawkins.”

So, should we take "a little bit outside" as literally as it sounds? You certainly can, but in that same interview, the brothers also said they're both eager to explore the Upside Down, the alternate dimension from the first season. Whether the season kicks off just a few miles away, or a few worlds away, you'll get your answer when Stranger Things's second season debuts next month.

arrow
Food
The Gooey History of the Fluffernutter Sandwich

Open any pantry in New England and chances are you’ll find at least one jar of Marshmallow Fluff. Not just any old marshmallow crème, but Fluff; the one manufactured by Durkee-Mower of Lynn, Massachusetts since 1920, and the preferred brand of the northeast. With its familiar red lid and classic blue label, it's long been a favorite guilty pleasure and a kitchen staple beloved throughout the region.

This gooey, spreadable, marshmallow-infused confection is used in countless recipes and found in a variety of baked goods—from whoopie pies and Rice Krispies Treats to chocolate fudge and beyond. And in the beyond lies perhaps the most treasured concoction of all: the Fluffernutter sandwich—a classic New England treat made with white bread, peanut butter, and, you guessed it, Fluff. No jelly required. Or wanted.

There are several claims to the origin of the sandwich. The first begins with Revolutionary War hero Paul Revere—or, not Paul exactly, but his great-great-great-grandchildren Emma and Amory Curtis of Melrose, Massachusetts. Both siblings were highly intelligent and forward-thinkers, and Amory was even accepted into MIT. But when the family couldn’t afford to send him, he founded a Boston-based company in the 1890s that specialized in soda fountain equipment.

He sold the business in 1901 and used the proceeds to buy the entire east side of Crystal Street in Melrose. Soon after he built a house and, in his basement, he created a marshmallow spread known as Snowflake Marshmallow Crème (later called SMAC), which actually predated Fluff. By the early 1910s, the Curtis Marshmallow Factory was established and Snowflake became the first commercially successful shelf-stable marshmallow crème.

Although other companies were manufacturing similar products, it was Emma who set the Curtis brand apart from the rest. She had a knack for marketing and thought up many different ways to popularize their marshmallow crème, including the creation of one-of-a-kind recipes, like sandwiches that featured nuts and marshmallow crème. She shared her culinary gems in a weekly newspaper column and radio show. By 1915, Snowflake was selling nationwide.

During World War I, when Americans were urged to sacrifice meat one day a week, Emma published a recipe for a peanut butter and marshmallow crème sandwich. She named her creation the "Liberty Sandwich," as a person could still obtain his or her daily nutrients while simultaneously supporting the wartime cause. Some have pointed to Emma’s 1918 published recipe as the earliest known example of a Fluffernutter, but the earliest recipe mental_floss can find comes from three years prior. In 1915, the confectioners trade journal Candy and Ice Cream published a list of lunch offerings that candy shops could advertise beyond hot soup. One of them was the "Mallonut Sandwich," which involved peanut butter and "marshmallow whip or mallo topping," spread on lightly toasted whole wheat bread.

Another origin story comes from Somerville, Massachusetts, home to entrepreneur Archibald Query. Query began making his own version of marshmallow crème and selling it door-to-door in 1917. Due to sugar shortages during World War I, his business began to fail. Query quickly sold the rights to his recipe to candy makers H. Allen Durkee and Fred Mower in 1920. The cost? A modest $500 for what would go on to become the Marshmallow Fluff empire.

Although the business partners promoted the sandwich treat early in the company’s history, the delicious snack wasn’t officially called the Fluffernutter until the 1960s, when Durkee-Mower hired a PR firm to help them market the sandwich, which resulted in a particularly catchy jingle explaining the recipe.

So who owns the bragging rights? While some anonymous candy shop owner was likely the first to actually put the two together, Emma Curtis created the early precursors and brought the concept to a national audience, and Durkee-Mower added the now-ubiquitous crème and catchy name. And the Fluffernutter has never lost its popularity.

In 2006, the Massachusetts state legislature spent a full week deliberating over whether or not the Fluffernutter should be named the official state sandwich. On one side, some argued that marshmallow crème and peanut butter added to the epidemic of childhood obesity. The history-bound fanatics that stood against them contended that the Fluffernutter was a proud culinary legacy. One state representative even proclaimed, "I’m going to fight to the death for Fluff." True dedication, but the bill has been stalled for more than a decade despite several revivals and subsequent petitions from loyal fans.

But Fluff lovers needn’t despair. There’s a National Fluffernutter Day (October 8) for hardcore fans, and the town of Somerville, Massachusetts still celebrates its Fluff pride with an annual What the Fluff? festival.

"Everyone feels like Fluff is part of their childhood," said self-proclaimed Fluff expert and the festival's executive director, Mimi Graney, in an interview with Boston Magazine. "Whether born in the 1940s or '50s, or '60s, or later—everyone feels nostalgic for Fluff. I think New Englanders in general have a particular fondness for it."

Today, the Fluffernutter sandwich is as much of a part of New England cuisine as baked beans or blueberry pie. While some people live and die by the traditional combination, the sandwich now comes in all shapes and sizes, with the addition of salty and savory toppings as a favorite twist. Wheat bread is as popular as white, and many like to grill their sandwiches for a touch of bistro flair. But don't ask a New Englander to swap out their favorite brand of marshmallow crème. That’s just asking too Fluffing much.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios