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14 Enjoyable Fan Art Mashups

KyleLambert.co.uk
KyleLambert.co.uk

One of the greatest things about fan art mash ups is that each picture can paint a story that our minds immediately want to start filling in with the details we know about the existing creations. In fact, some of the images make us long for a full length feature exploring the combination of two completely different worlds. Here are a few of the greatest and geekiest mashups around.

1. Futurama/X-Men

There are tons of Futurama art mashups, but this one, by DeviantArt user gottabecarl, is by far the best if only for the amazing number of characters he managed to work into one creation. Now that is one dedicated fan.

2. X-Men/A Christmas Story

What happens when Wolverine is “triple dog dared” to lick Iceman’s chest in this image by Jason Welborn? The same thing that happens to poor Flick in A Christmas Story. Fortunately for Wolverine, while it will still hurt like crazy to pull his tongue free, at least his mutant healing powers will allow him to walk away without a bandage tied to his tongue.

3. Avengers/Spongebob Squarepants

There was tons of Avengers fan art created after the film was released last summer, but when it comes to fun mashups, it’s hard to beat the combination of superheroes with Spongebob’s underwater world by Alex Ryan. While Sandy could probably hold her own, it’s pretty hard to imagine the rest of this team doing much damage against Planki’s evil hordes.

4. The Gals of Gotham/Disney Princesses

In a way, it’s too bad that Disney bought Marvel rather than DC, because as DeviantArt user BrowncoatFiction has discovered, Poison Ivy, Harley Quinn, and Catwoman all make pretty great princesses. I particularly like the idea of Princess Catwoman going around stealing the jewels of the other Disney princesses.

5. Ren & Stimpy/Batman

In a world where the best superhero has a head made from powdered toast and flies backwards as the people he rescues grab on his butt, would it really be that bad if a moronic cat and grumpy chihuahua had all of Batman’s wonderful gadgets? Of course, as creator Steven Howard points out, the pair might be too self-involved and lazy to actually get out of their Bat Cave very often.

6. Boba Fett/Batman

The great thing about Plino Pinto’s Star Wars/Batman creation is that, in this scenario, Batman has either turned bounty hunter or Boba Fett has turned into a hero. Either way, the resulting story would certainly be fascinating.

7. Spider-Man/Kirby

If Kirby really did inherit Spider-Man’s powers like he does in this artwork by DeviantArt user soulrailer, just imagine how powerful he could become—particularly when fighting against other Nintendo icons in Super Smash Bros.

8. Adventure Time/Skyrim

Finn and Jake are all about video games and kicking butt, so really, they’d probably love playing Skyrim, and if Finn could make himself into the Dovahfinn—like in this great design by DeviantArt user radiostarkiller—then he’d be that much happier.

9. Wall-E/Star Wars


One of the best things about this creation by James Silvani is that he didn’t take the easy road to make Wall-E and EVE into droids. Instead he cast the two lovers as another great set of sci-fi romantics—Princess Leia and Han Solo.

10. Toy Story/The Shining

What happens when you take one of Stephen King’s most famous stories and replace all the characters with toys? You get Kyle Lambert’s Toy Shining. And fortunately for us, Kyle didn’t just limit himself to one or two images, but instead captured a variety of the greatest scenes—from the “All work and no play” typewriter, to “Here’s Johnny,” to the creepy twin girls. He’s translated it all into the world of Toy Story.

11. Muppets/Lord of the Rings

Despite his size, Sweetums is such a kind character that I can’t help but feel that this Lord of the Rings mashup by Justin Larocca Hansen actually depicts more of a hide-and-go-seek scenario than a fear-filled scene where these Muppets are hiding for their lives.

12. Harry Potter/Doctor Who

This blend of sci-fi and fantasy seems odd when you really think about it, but somehow Matt Smith’s boyish charms and the mysterious workings of the TARDIS make this mashup by Jeffrey Delgado work surprisingly well.

13. Doctor Who/The Wizard of Oz


If Simon Breeze’s Cyberman only had a heart, then he’d almost certainly need another upgrade, because as any fully functional Cyberman will tell you, emotions only make you weak.

14. Doctor Who/Wallace and Gromit

In a way, Tom Baker’s cheerful and goofy version of the Doctor really does make him perfect for a Wallace and Gromit cartoon staring the Doctor and K-9. If only Roger Langridge could work together with the BBC and Nick Park to make this a reality.

If these stories became realities, which would you want to watch? Also, do any of you have some ideas for great mashups—even if you don’t have the artistic abilities to make them yourself?

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iStock
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The Simple Optical Illusion That Makes an Image Look Like It's Drawing Itself
iStock
iStock

Artist James Nolan Gandy invents robot arms that sketch intricate mathematical shapes with pen and paper. When viewed in real time, the effect is impressive. But it becomes even more so when the videos are sped up in a timelapse. If you look closely in the video below, the illustration appears to materialize faster than the robot can put the design to paper. Gizmodo recently explained how the illusion works to make it look like parts of the sketch are forming before the machine has time to draw them.

The optical illusion isn’t an example of tricky image editing: It’s the result of something called the wagon wheel effect. You can observe this in a car wheel accelerating down the highway or in propeller blades lifting up a helicopter. If an object makes enough rotations per second, it can appear to slow down, move backwards, or even stand still.

This is especially apparent on film. Every “moving image” we see on a screen is an illusion caused by the brain filling in the gaps between a sequence of still images. In the case of the timelapse video below, the camera captured the right amount of images, in the right order, to depict the pen as moving more slowly than it did in real life. But unlike the pen, the drawing formed throughout the video isn't subject to the wagon-wheel effect, so it still appears to move at full speed. This difference makes it look like the sketch is drawing itself, no pen required.

Gandy frequently shares behind-the-scenes videos of his mechanical art on his Instagram page. You can check out some of his non-timelapse clips like the one below to better understand how his machines work, then visit his website to browse and purchase the art made by his 'bots.

And if you think his stuff is impressive, make sure to explore some of the incredible art robots have made in the past.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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Tessa Angus
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Surprising Sculptures Made From Fallen Feathers
Kate MccGwire, Orchis, 2012
Kate MccGwire, Orchis, 2012
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire is a British sculptor with an unusual medium: feathers. Her surreal, undulating works often take the form of installations—the feathers spilling out of a drain, a stove, a crypt wall—or stand-alone sculptures in which antique bell jars, cabinets, or trunks contain otherworldly shapes.

MccGwire developed her obsession with feathers after moving to a studio barge on the Thames in 2006, as she explains in a video from Crane.tv recently spotlighted by Boing Boing. The barge was near a large shed full of feral pigeons, whose feathers she would spot on her way to work. "I started picking them up and laying them out, collecting them," she remembers. "And after about two weeks I had like 300 feathers." At the time, concerns about bird flu were rife, which made the feathers seem "dangerous as well as beautiful."

When not supplied by her own next-door menagerie, the feathers for her artwork come from a network of racing pigeon societies all over the UK, who send her envelopes full every time the birds molt. Farmers and gamekeepers also send her fallen feathers from birds such as magpies, pheasants, and roosters.

The cultural associations around birds are a big part of what inspires MccGwire. “The dove is the symbol of peace, purity, and fertility," she told ArtNews in 2013, "but it’s exactly the same species as a pigeon—which everyone regards as being dirty, foul, a pest.”

The same duality is present in her own work, which she frequently shares on her Instagram account. “I want to seduce by what I do—but revolt in equal measure. It’s really important to me that you’ve got that rejection of things you think you know for sure.”

You can see some pictures of MccGwire's work, and watch the video from Crane.tv, below.

Kate MccGwire's installation "Evacuate"
Evacuate, 2010
J Wilde

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Convolous"
Convolous, 2015
JP Bland

Kate MccGwire's installation "Gyre"
Gyre, 2012
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Gag"
Gag, 2009
JP Bland

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Writhe"
Writhe, 2010
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Quell"
Quell, 2011
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Taunt"
Taunt, 2012
Tessa Angus

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