Weekend Links: Words That Define World History

The Future is now! The most futuristic predictions that came true in 2012.
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The world's most dangerous animal is...
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From Cindy, a very cool photo array: if all the lights went out, what kind of sky would city dwellers see at night?
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Juxtaposition: "There is a new, incredible image now available of the US at night. NASA and NOAA's new mosaics from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), on the Soumi satellite detects light from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to see dim signals such as city lights, gas flares, auroras, wildfires and even reflected moonlight."
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For Hobbit fans, ?Empire's "How Quickly Can You Name The Dwarves?" Supercut?, by the actors from the film.
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Beautiful: rainbow eucalyptus. Looks like it's from another world.
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How teddy bears came to be (basically, Teddy Roosevelt + Bear = … but wait! there's more!)
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How To Shoot 2,000 Nudes a Second (safe for work! no bits shown thanks to the blur). Very interesting process.
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Beautiful multi-frame video of British diver Tom Daley, a "360 degree immersion" and look at his dives. Cool stuff.
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Words That Define World History via a Wikipedia word cloud. Unfortunate that "war" is the name of the game of the United States ...
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A big thanks to everyone who sent in links this week -- keep it up! Send your Flossy submissions to FlossyLinks@gmail.com. Happy New Year!

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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