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Music History #16: "Nothing Has Been Proved"

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“Nothing Has Been Proved”
Written by Neil Tennant & Chris Lowe (1989)
Performed by Dusty Springfield

The Music


With kitchen sink ballads like “You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me” and “Anyone Who Had A Heart,” Dusty Springfield reigned as Britain’s queen of sophisticated pop drama in the 1960s. But by the late ‘70s, mental illness and substance abuse had derailed her career. Then, in 1987, the Pet Shop Boys collaborated with Dusty on the hit “What Have I Done To Deserve This?” and introduced her to a whole new generation. Two years later, the trio got together again to record “Nothing Has Been Proved” for the soundtrack of Scandal, a movie about the Profumo Affair. The song, featured over the closing credits, went to #16 on the UK charts.

Dusty’s video for the song mixes archival footage with scenes from the movie.

The History

As the 1960s dawned in England, the established order of post-war society was being challenged and subverted on many fronts. Penguin Books was prosecuted for publishing Lady Chatterley’s Lover, a novel by D.H. Lawrence that used the f-word and had several explicit—for the time, at least—sex scenes. Political and social satire was exploding in magazines (Private Eye), on television (That Was The Week That Was) and in the theater (Beyond The Fringe). Author Ian Fleming rocked the paperback trade with his fictional super spy James Bond. And of course, a pop culture curiosity called The Beatles was about to completely turn the country upside down.

That said, in 1963, it was still deeply shocking when a public figure like a politician got caught with their pants down.

Long before Bill Clinton, John Edwards, and Elliot Spitzer, there was John Profumo.


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The son of a prominent barrister, Profumo was an Oxford-educated veteran of WWII, recipient of the OBE (an award for distinguished service or achievement in the British Empire), and a highly-regarded British politician who had served in various government positions beginning in 1945. In 1960, he was appointed the Secretary of State for War.

He was happily married to a well-known actress named Valerie Hobson, and they had a young son. His life was altogether settled and respectable.

Then, at a party in 1961, Profumo met a stripper named Christine Keeler, and the wheels were set in motion for one of the biggest political scandals of the 20th century.

The Showgirl and the Socialite


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Keeler was born in Middlesex, England in 1942. After an unhappy childhood with an abusive stepfather, Keeler left home at 16 and settled in London. A few years later, she started working as a topless dancer. At Murray’s Cabaret Club, she befriended another stripper, Mandy Rice-Davies and, through her, met the man who would become the catalyst of the Profumo Affair, a doctor named Stephen Ward.

Ward was a prominent socialite, known for his extravagant parties that mixed rich and powerful members of London society with actors, musicians, and writers. He also had a thing for pretty girls from lower-class backgrounds. He dated Rice-Davies and Keeler, and soon they’d both moved in with him.

At one of his parties, Ward introduced Keeler to Profumo, and soon the two started having an affair. What the Secretary of War didn’t know was that Keeler was also sharing a bed with, among others, Yevgeny Ivanov, a senior naval attaché at the Soviet Embassy. Suddenly, an extramarital affair turned into a national security risk.

British military agency MI-5 had recruited Ward in a scheme to bring down Ivanov with sexual blackmail. When MI-5 approached Profumo for his help, he learned that his mistress was in the middle of the whole mess. Shortly after, he broke it off with her. But the damage had been done.

“No impropriety”

Profumo’s affair might’ve remained a secret if it hadn’t been for a shooting incident at the home of Rice-Davies. Among the many men that she and Keeler had been involved with, there were two gangsters. The result was not so much a love triangle as a love quadrilateral. Add in jealousy, drugs, and guns, and the situation came to a head when one of the gangsters came looking for Keeler and blasted the door of the flat.

That disturbance brought the police, which tipped off the press that there might be a bigger story afoot. Reporters soon sniffed out Keeler’s affairs with both Profumo and Ivanov, and the story hit the papers.

Profumo’s downfall came in March 1963, when he lied to the House of Commons, saying there was “no impropriety whatever.” It was the “I did not have sexual relations with that woman” of the 1960s. To make matters worse, Profumo threatened the press with libel and slander suits if the allegations were repeated. But the press kept investigating. On June 5, Profumo admitted that he had lied. In shame, he resigned.

Profumo, his wife and their 8-year old son soon disappeared from public view, taking up residence in the country. Profumo poured himself into social work. He has refused to ever speak about the affair with the press.

In 2006, his son David wrote Bringing Down The House, a frank memoir about his father and the effect his indiscretions had on his family.

Though it was never proved that his affair with Keeler had led to any breach in national security, the resulting scandal played a big part in forever changing how we view politicians.

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13 Fantastic Museums You Can Visit for Free on Saturday
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On Saturday, September 23, museums and cultural institutions across the United States will open their doors to the public for free, as part of Smithsonian magazine’s annual Museum Day Live! event. Hundreds of museums are set to participate, ranging from world-famous institutions in major cities to tiny, local museums in small towns. While the full list of museums can be viewed, and tickets can be reserved, on the Smithsonian website, we’ve collected a small selection of the fantastic museums you can visit for free this Saturday.

1. NEWSEUM // WASHINGTON, D.C.

The Newseum in Washington, D.C. is an entire museum dedicated to the First Amendment. Celebrating freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly and petition, the museum features exhibits on civil rights, the Berlin Wall, and the history of news media in America. Their latest special exhibitions take a look back at the event of September 11, 2001 and go inside the FBI's crime-fighting tactics.

2. INTREPID SEA, AIR & SPACE MUSEUM // NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK

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New York's Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum doesn’t just showcase America’s military and maritime history—it is a piece of that history. The museum itself is one of the Essex-class aircraft carriers built by the United States Navy during World War II. Visitors can explore its massive deck and interior, and view historic airplanes, a real World War II submarine, and a range of interactive exhibits. Normally, a ticket will set you back a whopping $33 (or $19 for New York City residents), but on Saturday, general admission is free with a Museum Day Live! ticket.

3. AUTRY MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST // LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

Perfect for art lovers, history buffs, and cinephiles alike, the Autry Museum of the American West (named for legendary singing cowboy Gene Autry) offers up an eclectic mix of art, historical artifacts from the real American West, and Western film memorabilia and props.

4. MUSEUM OF ARTS AND SCIENCES // DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA

A massive art, science, and history museum located on a 90-acre nature preserve, the Museum of Arts and Sciences features the largest collection of Florida art anywhere in the world, as well as the largest collection of Coca-Cola memorabilia in all of Florida. Its diverse exhibits are alternately awe-inspiring, informative, and quirky, ranging from an exploration of 2000 years of sculpture art to an exhibition of 19th and 20th century advertising posters.

5. INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE HORSE AT THE KENTUCKY HORSE PARK // LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

The International Museum of the Horse explores the history of—you guessed it!—the horse. That might sound like a narrow scope, but the museum doesn’t just display horse racing artifacts or teach you about modern horse breeds. Instead, it endeavors to tackle the 50-million-year evolution of the horse and its relationship with humans from ancient times to modern times.

6. THE PEGGY NOTEBAERT NATURE MUSEUM // CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

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The 160-year-old Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum is pulling out all the stops for this year’s Museum Day Live! In addition to their vast exhibits of animal specimens and cultural artifacts, the museum will be hosting a live animal feeding and a butterfly release throughout the day.

7. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART // NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

The Ogden Museum of Southern Art aims to teach visitors about the rich culture and diverse visual arts of the American South. Right now, visitors can view a collection of William Eggleston's photographs and check out the museum's 10th annual invitational exhibition of ceramic teacups and teapots.

8. BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF INDUSTRY // BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

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Located in a 19th century oyster cannery on the Baltimore waterfront, the Baltimore Museum of Industry tells the story of American manufacturing from garment making to video game design. Visitors this weekend can meet video game designers and create custom games at the museum’s interactive “Video Game Wizards” exhibit.

9. SYLVAN HEIGHTS BIRD PARK // SCOTLAND NECK, NORTH CAROLINA

You can meet 2000 birds from around the world this weekend at the 18-acre Sylvan Heights Bird Park. Visitors to the massive garden can walk through aviaries displaying birds from every continent except Antarctica, including ducks, geese, swans, and exotic birds from all over the world.

10. DELTA BLUES MUSEUM // CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI

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Visitors to the Delta Blues Museum can learn about the unique American musical art form in “the land where blues began,” with audiovisual exhibits centered on blues and rock legend Don Nix, as well as Paramount Records illustrator Anthony Mostrom.

11. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NUCLEAR SCIENCE & HISTORY // ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

America’s only congressionally chartered museum dedicated to the story of the Atomic Age, the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History features exhibits on everything from nuclear medicine to representations of atomic power in pop culture. Adult visitors to the museum will delight in its impressively nuanced take on nuclear technology, while kids will love the museum’s outdoor airplane exhibit and hands-on science activities at Little Albert’s Lab.

12. MUSEUM OF THE MOUNTAIN MAN // PINEDALE, WYOMING

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Dedicated to the mountain men who explored and settled Wyoming in the 19th century, the Museum of the Mountain Man brings American folklore and legends to life. The museum features exhibits on the Rocky Mountain fur trade and tells the story of American folk legend and famed mountain man Hugh Glass (the man Leonardo DiCaprio won an Oscar playing in 2015's The Revenant).

13. BESH BA GOWAH ARCHAEOLOGICAL PARK AND MUSEUM // GLOBE, ARIZONA

Arizona’s Besh Ba Gowah Archaeological Park and Museum lets visitors connect with history firsthand. The museum is home to the ruins and artifacts of the Salado Indians who inhabited Arizona from the 13th century through the 15th century, and even lets visitors wander through an 800-year-old Salado pueblo.

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‘American Gothic’ Became Famous Because Many People Saw It as a Joke
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In 1930, Iowan artist Grant Wood painted a simple portrait of a farmer and his wife (really his dentist and sister) standing solemnly in front of an all-American farmhouse. American Gothic has since inspired endless parodies and is regarded as one of the country’s most iconic works of art. But when it first came out, few people would have guessed it would become the classic it is today. Vox explains the painting’s unexpected path to fame in the latest installment of the new video series Overrated.

According to host Phil Edwards, American Gothic made a muted splash when it first hit the art scene. The work was awarded a third-place bronze medal in a contest at the Chicago Art Institute. When Wood sold the painting to the museum later on, he received just $300 for it. But the piece’s momentum didn’t stop there. It turned out that American Gothic’s debut at a time when urban and rural ideals were clashing helped it become the defining image of the era. The painting had something for everyone: Metropolitans like Gertrude Stein saw it as a satire of simple farm life in Middle America. Actual farmers and their families, on the other hand, welcomed it as celebration of their lifestyle and work ethic at a time when the Great Depression made it hard to take pride in anything.

Wood didn’t do much to clear up the work’s true meaning. He stated, "There is satire in it, but only as there is satire in any realistic statement. These are types of people I have known all my life. I tried to characterize them truthfully—to make them more like themselves than they were in actual life."

Rather than suffering from its ambiguity, American Gothic has been immortalized by it. The country has changed a lot in the past century, but the painting’s dual roles as a straight masterpiece and a format for skewering American culture still endure today.

Get the full story from Vox below.

[h/t Vox]

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