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32 Vintage Photos of People Having a Merry Christmas

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Getty Images

From a few famous faces to adorable animals and kids under the tree to soldiers in wartime, here's how we've had a Merry Christmas through the years.

1889: Three children gathered around Christmas tree with toys.

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1896: Two little girls in bed, playing with Japanese dolls; a little boy with a drum stands at the bedside. Stockings hang from the mantel behind them.

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1897: Grandpa's visit.

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1900: Remount Depot De Aar-Christmas group in the Boer War.

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1902: Robert Falcon Scott's sledge party, which reached the furthest southern latitude on his national Antarctic expedition, celebrating Christmas. Lieutenant Ernest Shackleton, left, Captain Robert Falcon Scott, center, and Dr Edward Adrian Wilson, right.

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1902: Girl seated in bed with roomful of toys.

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1909: Elderly man seated, holding toy horse, facing right, with arm around young boy.

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1912: British sailors celebrating Christmas onboard the festively decorated HMS Mermaid.

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1914: A British Army medical post on Christmas Day at the front in 1914.

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1916: Christmas time in a ward at King George's Military Hospital. Walking patients decorate the wall by a patient whose bed had been donated by 'Charles Wingfield Esq.'

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1918: At a hospital children's Christmas party, Santa arrives in a bon-bon watched by a crowd of children.

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1921: Members of the Plymouth Ladies and 7 o'clock Regulars Swimming Club arrive on motorbikes for their swim on Christmas morning.

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1922: From left to right, Mr Wheeler, Mr Green, Mrs Savage, Mr Arundel, Colonel Harvey and Mr Savage line up with Father Christmas on the Cunard liner Berengaria (former Hamburg America Line vessel Imperator).

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1925: A happy boy in bed on Christmas morning with toys he has received.

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1925: A woman's head popping out of a parcel.

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1925: American author F Scott Fitzgerald (1896 - 1940) dances with his wife Zelda Fitzgerald (nee Sayre) (1900 - 1948) and daughter Frances (aka 'Scottie') in front of the Christmas tree in Paris.

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1925: A little girl hammers up a request to Father Christmas above her bed at the Brecknock Blind School for Children.

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1926: Father Christmas with six babies born on Christmas Day at the City of London Maternity home.

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1929: A sailor peers from the mouth of a gun holding two Christmas puddings in his hands, Christmas festivities on board HMS Rodney.

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1930: Children welcome Santa Claus as he leaves his plane.

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1935: Christmas cheer at the greyhound stables.

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1936: American child actor Shirley Temple sitting by her decorated Christmas tree with presents from 20th Century Fox, 1936. Stockings are hung from the mantel behind her.

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1937: Christmas proved to be happy but tiring for this youngster, worn out after the day's events.

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1939: The London ice hockey team the Earl's Court Rangers having their Christmas lunch served on the ice; the goalkeeper looks at the turkey.

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1940: A young lady is delighted to find her dog dressed in a Santa Claus hat at Christmas.

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1940: Wartime shelter festively decorated for the sleeping child's Christmas.

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1947: Babe Ruth is dressed as Santa Claus with 3 year old Jimmy McCall on his knee and Jane Greenfield at his side during a Christmas Party for 65 young Poliomyelitis victims given by the Sister Elizabeth Kenny Foundation in the Hotel Astor in New York City.

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1955: A young boy rides the tricycle that he has just received for Christmas while a puppy sits in his lap.

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1955: Minnie and Jane, two of London Zoo's chimpanzees, pulling a cracker at their Christmas party.

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1956: Radio and television announcer Frank Blair helps his son with a brand new model train set on Christmas morning.

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1962: Jacqueline Kennedy and her husband, President John F. Kennedy, attend a White House staff Christmas Party December 1962 in Washington.

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1964: Comic actor Charlie Chaplin (1889 - 1977), his wife Oona O'Neill (1925 - 1991) and their children read copies of his autobiography in various languages, in a pose for their 1964 Christmas card picture, December 1964. On sofa, left to right: Christopher, Oona, and Chaplin. Back, left to right: Annette, Jane, Eugene, Victoria and Josephine.

Most images and original captions via Getty. This post first appeared last Christmas.

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

501069-OpeningCeremony3.jpg

Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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iStock

If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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