24 Adorable Photos of Presidents With Little Kids

Pete Souza/White House

After TIME named Barack Obama its Person of the Year, it released a series of photos by Pete Souza—which included the adorable photo above, of the president pretending to get caught in Spider-Man's web (Spider-Man, in this case, was the child of a White House staff member). That inspired us to dig up other aww-inducing photos of presidents with kids.

Speak softly and hug tight: Teddy Roosevelt shows us his soft side, hugging granddaughter Edith Roosevelt Derby in 1918.

President Taft plays with a baby, circa 1909.

The Dog Days of the Presidency: President Lyndon B. Johnson howls skyward with his dog, Yuki, in 1968. Grandson Patrick Nugent looks on, wondering why adults are so darn weird.

Ronald Reagan dines with his pen pal, six-year-old Rudy Hines, in 1984.

Move over, Secret Service. Two brave cowboys pose with Warren G. Harding and his pup, Laddie boy.

Harding does what presidents do best—he holds a baby. In this 1923 photo, he stands with farmers from Hutchinson, Kansas.

Pound it: George W. Bush tries his best at fist bumping in 2008.

Photo by Suzanne Plunkett via Suprmchaos.

Shortly after leaving office, President Bill Clinton spent some time downtown playing tag with kids at the Family Life Academy of the Latino Pastoral Action Center in New York.

A little girl whispers into Ronald Reagan’s ear in 1984. It must’ve been Top Secret.

This unidentified child looks thrilled to meet Richard Nixon at Pennsylvania Station in Pittsburgh.

President Gerald Ford and James Paxson meet with Nebraska’s littlest dignitaries while opening the Ford Birthsite Park in Omaha, 1976.

Photo courtesy Stanley Tretick/Look Magazine

Playing Politics: President Kennedy may have run the country, but in this 1963 photo, John Jr. shows us who runs the household. Here, the two-year-old tot plays under Kennedy’s desk in the oval office.

President Reagan poses with Drew Barrymore at a ceremony launching the Young Astronauts program in 1984. In his diary, Reagan wrote, “Little Drew Barrymore—the child in E.T.—was one of the children [I met]. She’s a nice little person.”

When a troupe of movie stars visited President Harry Truman in 1946, child actress Margaret O’Brien plopped a close seat by Mr. President. Two years earlier, O’Brien had starred as “Tootie” in Meet Me in St. Louis with Judy Garland. Other notables in the photo include Angela Lansbury (top left) and Cesar Romero (top right).

One year before becoming president, Franklin D. Roosevelt built a small house in Warm Springs, Georgia. The area boasted natural, 88-degree springs, and FDR believed the waters could heal his leg ailments. He bought acres of land and established the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation, which was exclusively devoted to polio patients. Here, FDR mingles with two young patients at the Institute.

In one of the few photos of FDR in a wheelchair, the president, his terrier Fala, and a friend’s granddaughter play at Hill Top Cottage in Hyde Park, N.Y., February 1941.

Photo courtesy of Stanford News

Long before Herbert Hoover became president, he was founder and head of the American Relief Administration (ARA). During World War One, Hoover helped feed more than 2 million Poles per day. In this picture, Hoover walks with a crowd of Polish children.

Pete Souza/White House

One more of President Obama.

Nice handiwork. Three years before Calvin Coolidge was installed into office, he spent a July day building a cart with his son.

James A. Garfield sits at his desk with daughter Mary a few years before assuming the Presidency.

Image courtesy of the Boy Scouts of America

Shoulders back! President William H. Taft surveys a troop of Boy Scouts. In 1910, Taft became the honorary president of the Boy Scouts.

Lowriding: President George H.W. Bush pulls his grandson, Sam LeBlond, behind a bicycle in Kennebunkport in 1989.

Lincoln reads with his son, Tad, in February 1865. This is the only known picture of Lincoln wearing spectacles.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
fun
Employees at Antarctica's McMurdo Station Are Throwing a Party for Pride Month
iStock
iStock

Employees at Antarctica's McMurdo Station are gearing up to celebrate Pride month in one of the world's harshest environments. On Saturday, June 9, the station will host what Hannah Valian, who deals with the center's recycling efforts, calls "one of the larger parties ever thrown" at the station.

McMurdo Station is an Antarctic research facility owned and operated by the United States. The station is more sparsely populated during Antarctica's colder autumn and winter seasons (which run from March to September), but employees tell us there's still a decent-sized LGBTQ scene to celebrate this June.

About 10 of the 133 people currently at McMurdo identify as LGBTQ, says Rachel Bowens-Rubin, a station laboratory assistant. Valian said the idea for a Pride celebration came up in May at one of the station's regular LGBTQ socials.

"Everyone got really excited about it," she tells Mental Floss via email. "So we ran with it."

Ten individuals are wearing coats while holding a rainbow-colored Pride flag. They are standing in snow with mountains in the distance.
"I hope when people see this photo they'll be reminded that LGBTQ people aren't limited to a place, a culture, or a climate," McMurdo's Evan Townsend tells Mental Floss. "We are important and valuable members of every community, even at the bottom of the world."
Courtesy of Shawn Waldron

Despite reports that this is the continent's first Pride party, none of the event's organizers are convinced this is the first Pride celebration Antarctica has seen. Sous chef Zach Morgan tells us he's been attending LGBTQ socials at McMurdo since 2009.

"The notion is certainly not new here," he says.

To Evan Townsend, a steward at the station, this weekend's Pride event is less a milestone and more a reflection of the history of queer acceptance in Antarctica.

"If anything," Townsend says, "recognition belongs to those who came to Antarctica as open members of the LGBTQ community during much less welcoming times in the recent past."

This week, though, McMurdo's employees only had positive things to say about the station's acceptance of LGBTQ people.

"I have always felt like a valued member of the community here," Morgan tells us in an email. "Most people I've met here have been open and supportive. I've never felt the need to hide myself here, and that's one of the reasons I love working here."

Saturday's celebration will feature a dance floor, photo booth, lip sync battles, live music, and a short skit explaining the history of Pride, Valian says.

"At the very least, I hope the attention our Pride celebration has garnered has inspired someone to go out and explore the world, even if they might feel different or afraid they might not fit in," Morgan says. "'Cause even on the most inhospitable place on Earth, there's still people who will love and respect you no matter who you are."

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Courtesy of Airpod
arrow
travel
New Nap Pods—Complete with Alarm Clocks and Netflix—Set for A Trial Run at Airports This Summer
Courtesy of Airpod
Courtesy of Airpod

Sleepy travelers in Europe can soon be on the lookout for Airpods, self-contained capsules designed to help passengers relax in privacy.

For 15 euros per hour (roughly $18), travelers can charge their phones, store their luggage, and, yes, nap on a chair that reclines into a bed. The Airpods are also equipped with television screens and free streaming on Netflix, Travel + Leisure reports.

To keep things clean between uses, each Airpod uses LED lights to disinfect the space and a scent machine to manage any unfortunate odors.

The company's two Slovenian founders, Mihael Meolic and Grega Mrgole, expect to conduct a trial run of the service by placing 10 pods in EU airports late this summer. By early 2019, they expect to have 100 Airpods installed in airports around the world, though the company hasn't yet announced which EU airports will receive the first Airpods.

The company eventually plans to introduce an element of cryptocurrency to its service. Once 1000 Airpods are installed (which the company expects to happen by late 2019), customers can opt in to a "Partnership Program." With this program, participants can become sponsors of one specific Airpod unit and earn up to 80 percent of the profits it generates each month. The company's cryptocurrency—called an APOD token—is already on sale through the Airpod website.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios