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12 Proposed Disney Attractions That Were Never Built

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Walt Disney once said, “It's kind of fun to do the impossible.” Well, my fine-mustachioed icon, it may have been fun, but sometimes it is simply impossible. The Disney theme parks had their fair share of true never-lands and rides—and here are 12 of them.

1. Lilliputian Land (Disneyland)

In 1953, Roy O. Disney took a sales pitch to New York to raise money for this little land inspired by Gulliver's Travels. The idea was to build a miniature Americana village populated by 9-inch-tall singing and dancing mechanical people. One of the main attractions of this land would have been a ride on a 17-inch-tall locomotive, just like Lemuel.

2. Edison Square (Disneyland)

Photo courtesy Imagineering Disney Designed in the mid-1950s, this location—designed as a 1920s suburb, complete with a statue of Thomas Edison—would have been a side land to Main Street USA. A main attraction called Harnessing the Lightning would tell the history of electricity and its effects on the American family. This idea was scratched for another similar idea, the Carousel of Progress, which Walt Disney brought to the 1964 New York World’s Fair.

3. Israel Pavilion (EPCOT)

In 1980, the State of Israel signed a deal to officially become part of Epcot. The proposed Israel Pavilion would have featured a menorah in the center of the courtyard, along with archaeological artifacts from The Jewish Museum in Tel Aviv. But due to possible security issues and boycotts, the Pavilion wasn’t built. Still, Israel was featured in an exhibit at the Millennium Pavilion from 1999 to 2001. It featured a simulator-movie ride called Journey to Jerusalem, a virtual tour of historic holy sites. 

4. Mt. Fuji Roller Coaster (EPCOT)

This ride was planned for the Japan Pavilion at Epcot, but it was thrown out not long after it was suggested thanks to protests by Eastman Kodak, the sponsor of the Journey into Imagination ride.  Kodak didn’t take kindly to a ride sharing the name of their biggest competitor, Fujifilm.

5. Atlantis Expedition (Disneyland)

Photo courtesy Imagineering Disney This premise was a reinvention of the Submarine Voyage ride. Patrons would use a mechanical arm that extended into the water, so they could get a chance to grab some doubloons and gems. It was based on the animated film Atlantis, but due to its failure at the box office, the ride never came to fruition. In its place now is Finding Nemo’s Submarine Voyage.

6. Bullet Train (EPCOT)

Image courtesy Jim Hill All aboard would stand in a Japanese simulated bullet train, looking out through the phony windows while taking a gander at all the fake scenery of Japan’s historic sites.

7. Iran Pavilion (EPCOT)

Hop on a ride through Persian history inside a replica of Golestan Palace! ...Or not. The Iran Pavilion was called off when the Shah of Iran was overthrown in 1979.

8. Soviet Union Pavilion (EPCOT)

Photo courtesy The Neverland Files Developed in the 1990s, this location would have featured recreations of St. Basil’s Cathedral and Red Square. The proposed area had two rides: a sled journey through the Russian scenery, and a ride-through attraction based on Russia’s famous folk tale The Fool and the Fish.  The story is about Ivan, a young fool who spares the life of a fish, specifically a pike. It just so happens that the pike is magical, and in return, Ivan is granted wishes from the pike.

9. Hotel Mel (MGM/Hollywood Studios)

Photo courtesy The Neverland Files The original Tower of Terror, but with everybody’s favorite Jewish grandpa, Mel Brooks. The premise: Guests would be told they were on the set of a horror film, directed by Brooks, that was being filmed inside an actual haunted hotel. The plot of the ride revolved around the idea of the guests auditioning for a role in the film and boarding studio golf carts. Gags would then ensue, such as Quasimodo as a bellman, Dracula attempting to shave in a mirror, and Frankenstein in a bathroom stall without TP next to the Mummy.

10.  S.S. Columbia Showcase of Nautical Marvels (Tokyo DisneySea)

Photo courtesy The Neverland Files The idea behind this "haunted swing" ride was that guests had booked a trip on the maiden voyage of the S.S. Columbia. It was promised to be the safest, fastest, and most comfortable Atlantic crossing ever, thanks to the ship's "Gyroscopically-Stabilized Self-Leveling Anti-Turbulence Lounges." Once seated for a demonstration of this new technology, the ride was designed to go haywire—the seating would swing up to 30 degrees, and the room would rotate 360 degrees—to disorienting effect. The ride was never built because designers didn't feel it pushed the envelope enough.

11.  Industrial Revolution Roller Coaster (Disney’s America)

Photo courtesy of The Neverland Files Due to be part of Disney's America, a proposed theme park in Haymarket, Virginia, this roller coaster would have traveled through a turn-of-the-century steel mill. The high point of the ride would have been evading a vat of molten steel. Sadly, the park was never built, and neither was this coaster.

12.  Nostromo (Magic Kingdom)

This ride was based on the film Alien. Guests would embark on a rescue mission, entering the ship's corridors to find its missing crewmembers in armored vehicles strapped with laser cannons. Instead, the ride evolved into Alien Encounter, a much tamer version with an original storyline—but Regis Philbin still thought it was scary. This post originally appeared in 2012.
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5 Things We Know About Stranger Things Season 2
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Netflix

Stranger Things seemed to come out of nowhere to become one of television's standout new series in 2016. Netflix's sometimes scary, sometimes funny, and always exciting homage to '80s pop culture was a binge-worthy phenomenon when it debuted in July 2016. Of course, the streaming giant wasn't going to wait long to bring more Stranger Things to audiences, and a second season was announced a little over a month after its debut—and Netflix just announced that we'll be getting it a few days earlier than expected. Here are five key things we know about the show's sophomore season, which kicks off on October 27.

1. WE'LL BE GETTING EVEN MORE EPISODES.

The first season of Stranger Things consisted of eight hour-long episodes, which proved to be a solid length for the story Matt and Ross Duffer wanted to tell. While season two won't increase in length dramatically, we will be getting at least one extra hour when the show returns in 2017 with nine episodes. Not much is known about any of these episodes, but we do know the titles:

"Madmax"
"The Boy Who Came Back To Life"
"The Pumpkin Patch"
"The Palace"
"The Storm"
"The Pollywog"
"The Secret Cabin"
"The Brain"
"The Lost Brother"

There's a lot of speculation about what each title means and, as usual with Stranger Things, there's probably a reason for each one.

2. THE KIDS ARE RETURNING (INCLUDING ELEVEN).

Stranger Things fans should gear up for plenty of new developments in season two, but that doesn't mean your favorite characters aren't returning. A November 4 photo sent out by the show's Twitter account revealed most of the kids from the first season will be back in 2017, including the enigmatic Eleven, played by Millie Bobby Brown (the #elevenisback hashtag used by series regular Finn Wolfhard should really drive the point home):

3. THE SHOW'S 1984 SETTING WILL LEAD TO A DARKER TONE.

A year will have passed between the first and second seasons of the show, allowing the Duffer brothers to catch up with a familiar cast of characters that has matured since we last saw them. With the story taking place in 1984, the brothers are looking at the pop culture zeitgeist at the time for inspiration—most notably the darker tone of blockbusters like Gremlins and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

"I actually really love Temple of Doom, I love that it gets a little darker and weirder from Raiders, I like that it feels very different than Raiders did," Matt Duffer told IGN. "Even though it was probably slammed at the time—obviously now people look back on it fondly, but it messed up a lot of kids, and I love that about that film—that it really traumatized some children. Not saying that we want to traumatize children, just that we want to get a little darker and weirder."

4. IT'S NOT SO MUCH A CONTINUATION AS IT IS A SEQUEL.

When you watch something like The Americans season two, it's almost impossible to catch on unless you've seen the previous episodes. Stranger Things season two will differ from the modern TV approach by being more of a sequel than a continuation of the first year. That means a more self-contained plot that doesn't leave viewers hanging at the end of nine episodes.

"There are lingering questions, but the idea with Season 2 is there's a new tension and the goal is can the characters resolve that tension by the end," Ross Duffer told IGN. "So it's going to be its own sort of complete little movie, very much in the way that Season 1 is."

Don't worry about the two seasons of Stranger Things being too similar or too different from the original, though, because when speaking with Entertainment Weekly about the influences on the show, Matt Duffer said, "I guess a lot of this is James Cameron. But he’s brilliant. And I think one of the reasons his sequels are as successful as they are is he makes them feel very different without losing what we loved about the original. So I think we kinda looked to him and what he does and tried to capture a little bit of the magic of his work.”

5. THE PREMIERE WILL TRAVEL OUTSIDE OF HAWKINS.

Everything about the new Stranger Things episodes will be kept secret until they finally debut later this year, but we do know one thing about the premiere: It won't take place entirely in the familiar town of Hawkins, Indiana. “We will venture a little bit outside of Hawkins,” Matt Duffer told Entertainment Weekly. “I will say the opening scene [of the premiere] does not take place in Hawkins.”

So, should we take "a little bit outside" as literally as it sounds? You certainly can, but in that same interview, the brothers also said they're both eager to explore the Upside Down, the alternate dimension from the first season. Whether the season kicks off just a few miles away, or a few worlds away, you'll get your answer when Stranger Things's second season debuts next month.

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Everything That’s Leaving Netflix in October
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NBC - © 2012 NBCUniversal Media, LLC

Netflix subscribers are already counting down the days until the premiere of the new season of Stranger Things. But, as always, in order to make room for the near-90 new titles making their way to the streaming site, some of your favorite titles—including all of 30 Rock, The Wonder Years, and Malcolm in the Middle—must go. Here’s everything that’s leaving Netflix in October ... binge ‘em while you can!

October 1

30 Rock (Seasons 1-7)

A Love in Times of Selfies

Across the Universe

Barton Fink

Bella

Big Daddy

Carousel

Cradle 2 the Grave

Crafting a Nation

Curious George: A Halloween Boo Fest

Daddy’s Little Girls

Dark Was the Night

David Attenborough’s Rise of the Animals: Triumph of the Vertebrates (Season 1)

Day of the Kamikaze

Death Beach

Dowry Law

Dr. Dolittle: Tail to the Chief

Friday Night Lights (Seasons 1-5)

Happy Feet

Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison

Hellboy

Kagemusha

Laura

Love Actually

Malcolm in the Middle (Seasons 1-7)

Max Dugan Returns

Millennium 

Million Dollar Baby

Mortal Combat

Mr. 3000

Mulholland Dr.

My Father the Hero

My Name Is Earl (Seasons 1-4)

One Tree Hill (Seasons 1-9)

Patton

Picture This

Prison Break (Seasons 1-4)

The Bernie Mac Show (Seasons 1-5)

The Shining

The Wonder Years (Seasons 1-6)

Titanic

October 19

The Cleveland Show (Seasons 1-4)

October 21

Bones (Seasons 5-11)

October 27

Lie to Me (Seasons 2-3)

Louie (Seasons 1-5)

Hot Transylvania 2

October 29

Family Guy (Seasons 9-14)

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