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12 Geeky Handmade Christmas Ornaments

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Looking to geek up your Christmas tree this year? Then maybe you should try making or buying one of these great one-of-a-kind, handmade ornaments.

1. Gotta Catch 'Em All

It’s fairly easy to make cute geeky ornaments with the basic clear ornament balls you can buy at any craft store, but the clever use of gold fabric and a little paint that creates a simple, adorable face makes this Pikachu ornament by DeviantArt user KaitlynClinkscales too cute to resist.

2. Holding Out For A Hero

Wanna make your holidays a little more super? Then follow Happy Looks Good on You’s lead and buy a few clear ornaments, fill the inside with paint, swirl and pour out the excess, and glue on an appropriate superhero logo. You can, of course, find more detailed instructions at the link.

3. Choose Your Own Adventure

You might have noticed by now that you can turn those clear ball ornaments into all kinds of amazing designs of your own. Of course, it takes some real artistic skills to paint one of those balls with a design this amazing. Fortunately, DeviantArt user LadyNin-Chan has the skills necessary to make an Adventure Time Christmas ornament become real—and real awesome.

4. Get Cultured

These Petri dish ornaments by Etsy seller artologica might just be the best ornaments a biologist could ever hope for. Some even look like wreaths! And don't worry about hanging any potentially hazardous bacteria samples on your tree—these designs are made from harmless watercolors.

5. Christmas Trek

Etsy seller Regeekery has all kinds of fantastic geek Christmas ornaments including old toys converted to tree decorations and fancy snowflakes bearing the TARDIS. But as great as many of the other ornaments are, nothing beats the geekery of this pun-tastic Wreath of Khan design.

6. Creature Feature

Cthulhu has never before looked this cuddly or this Christmasy. You can bring home your own adorable and festive monster thanks to Etsy seller SWStitchery, who custom makes every order.

7. Playing Video Games

Etsy seller useyourdigits has created the ultimate collection of Christmas ornaments for any true gamer featuring all the top gaming consoles from the last 20 years—all laser cut from black acrylic.

8. Meth Heads

While you're waiting for the last episodes of Breaking Bad to air, deck the halls with this hand-stitched tribute to the drug-fueled show made by Etsy seller madebygwen.

9. The Ornament That Lived

You can make your own gorgeous Golden Snitch ornament with a small golden glass ornament, wire, tissue paper, gold paint and some gold glitter. Tiny Apartment Crafts has all the instructions you need.

10. LEGO My Death Star

This is by far the most famous handmade geek Christmas ornament on the web—and with good reason: it features LEGOs and Star Wars. What more could you ask for? You can make your own LEGO Death Star with the help of this tutorial from LEGO master Chris McVeigh. He also has instructions to build your own Millennium Falcon if you need something on hand to destroy the Death Star.

11. It's Bacon!

If you can't get enough bacon, but aren't quite hardcore enough to hang meat off your tree, try making your own plush bacon ornament with this Instructable by chelsea7500.

12. It's Elementary

Whether you prefer the old-school Doyle stories or the BBC Sherlock series, there’s no denying how amazing the residents of 221B Baker Street happen to be. If you’re a die-hard Holmes fan, then show your love of the world’s greatest detective by making your own 221B Baker Street ornament with the help of this Instructable by harry_watson.

Bonus Tree Trimmings:

Already have enough geeky ornaments? Well then perhaps you’d prefer to spruce up your tree with a Doctor Who tree skirt from Etsy seller Nerdventions. She also has a Hoth-inspired Star Wars tree skirt available.

And, if you’re looking for a tree topper, this 8-bit Super Mario Bros Lakitu featuring a 1-Up mushroom from Etsy seller LighterCases is a pretty awesome option for any gamer’s tree.

Do you guys have any geek ornaments you made yourself? If so, tell us about them in the comments, and if you happen to know of any other great tutorials to make your own geeky Christmas decorations, please share the link so everyone can try their hand at the craft project.

For 12-12-12, we’ll be posting twenty-four '12 lists' throughout the day. Check back 12 minutes after every hour for the latest installment, or see them all here.

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Thomas Quine, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
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Weird
Take a Peek Inside One of Berlin's Strangest Museums
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Thomas Quine, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Vlad Korneev is a man with an obsession. He's spent years collecting technical and industrial objects from the last century—think iron lungs, World War II gas masks, 1930s fans, and vintage medical prostheses. At his Designpanoptikum in Berlin, which bills itself (accurately) as a "surreal museum of industrial objects," Korneev arranges his collection in fascinating, if disturbing, assemblages. (Atlas Obscura warns that it's "half design museum, half horror house of imagination.") Recently, the Midnight Archive caught up with Vlad for a special tour and some insight into the question visitors inevitably ask—"but what is it, really?" You can watch the full video below.

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Courtesy of Nikon
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science
Microscopic Videos Provide a Rare Close-Up Glimpse of the Natural World
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Courtesy of Nikon

Nature’s wonders aren’t always visible to the naked eye. To celebrate the miniature realm, Nikon’s Small World in Motion digital video competition awards prizes to the most stunning microscopic moving images, as filmed and submitted by photographers and scientists. The winners of the seventh annual competition were just announced on September 21—and you can check out the top submissions below.

FIRST PRIZE

Daniel von Wangenheim, a biologist at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria, took first place with a time-lapse video of thale cress root growth. For the uninitiated, thale cress—known to scientists as Arabidopsis thalianais a small flowering plant, considered by many to be a weed. Plant and genetics researchers like thale cress because of its fast growth cycle, abundant seed production, ability to pollinate itself, and wild genes, which haven’t been subjected to breeding and artificial selection.

Von Wangenheim’s footage condenses 17 hours of root tip growth into just 10 seconds. Magnified with a confocal microscope, the root appears neon green and pink—but von Wangenheim’s work shouldn’t be appreciated only for its aesthetics, he explains in a Nikon news release.

"Once we have a better understanding of the behavior of plant roots and its underlying mechanisms, we can help them grow deeper into the soil to reach water, or defy gravity in upper areas of the soil to adjust their root branching angle to areas with richer nutrients," said von Wangenheim, who studies how plants perceive and respond to gravity. "One step further, this could finally help to successfully grow plants under microgravity conditions in outer space—to provide food for astronauts in long-lasting missions."

SECOND PRIZE

Second place went to Tsutomu Tomita and Shun Miyazaki, both seasoned micro-photographers. They used a stereomicroscope to create a time-lapse video of a sweating fingertip, resulting in footage that’s both mesmerizing and gross.

To prompt the scene, "Tomita created tension amongst the subjects by showing them a video of daredevils climbing to the top of a skyscraper," according to Nikon. "Sweating is a common part of daily life, but being able to see it at a microscopic level is equal parts enlightening and cringe-worthy."

THIRD PRIZE

Third prize was awarded to Satoshi Nishimura, a professor from Japan’s Jichi Medical University who’s also a photography hobbyist. He filmed leukocyte accumulations and platelet aggregations in injured mouse cells. The rainbow-hued video "provides a rare look at how the body reacts to a puncture wound and begins the healing process by creating a blood clot," Nikon said.

To view the complete list of winners, visit Nikon’s website.

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