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Weekend Links: Real-Time Births and Deaths Map

Spooky but mesmerizing: a real-time map of of births and deaths in the United States (click on the image to get to the map itself).
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Very cool: "Super Mario Beads 3," a suburban stop-motion animated adventure made with … Legos? No! For once, something different (y'know ... beads).
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I get a little tired of everything being made of Lego (you guys have no idea how many links pass by my eyes every week that are Lego related), however … this Lego iPhone case is pretty legit because of all that you can add on to it. It may not be practical, but it's fun!
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For fans of "The Walking Dead" (or those who aren't but don't mind spoilers): a fantastic graphic called Stopping the Dead that takes a statistical look at the series so far (how many zombies killed, how and by whom).
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Another one of those uselessly animated websites, although this one is pretty creepy
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Just a single picture, but it really made me laugh: tweeted by ?@ScottFilmCritic?: "Whoever stacked these books is both evil and hilarious."
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We've all seen people drink themselves stupid, but can you drink yourself blind?
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A supercut from Slacktory that shows how Liam Neeson always seems to have the last word (so I gave it to him here ... naturally).
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A big thanks to everyone who sent in links this week - keep it up! Send your finds to FlossyLinks@gmail.com.

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Bone Broth 101
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Whether you drink it on its own or use it as stock, bone broth is the perfect recipe to master this winter. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education

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Why Can Parrots Talk and Other Birds Can't?
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If you've ever seen a pirate movie (or had the privilege of listening to this avian-fronted metal band), you're aware that parrots have the gift of human-sounding gab. Their brains—not their beaks—might be behind the birds' ability to produce mock-human voices, the Sci Show's latest video explains below.

While parrots do have articulate tongues, they also appear to be hardwired to mimic other species, and to create new vocalizations. The only other birds that are capable of vocal learning are hummingbirds and songbirds. While examining the brains of these avians, researchers noted that their brains contain clusters of neurons, which they've dubbed song nuclei. Since other birds don't possess song nuclei, they think that these structures probably play a key role in vocal learning.

Parrots might be better at mimicry than hummingbirds and songbirds thanks to a variation in these neurons: a special shell layer that surrounds each one. Birds with larger shell regions appear to be better at imitating other creatures, although it's still unclear why.

Learn more about parrot speech below (after you're done jamming out to Hatebeak).

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