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The 14 Video Games New York's MoMA Just Classified As Art

By Scott Meslow

Facebook/MoMA

Despite the protests of several high-profile critics — including Roger Ebert — the question over whether video games qualify as art has been answered with a resounding "yes." Just a few months after the Smithsonian wrapped up its popular exhibit on "The Art of Video Games," the Museum of Modern Art in New York City has acquired 14 video games as a "seedbed" for a collection that Senior Curator Paola Antonelli says will eventually include "about 40" games. (Read the full list of games, and watch gameplay footage of each, below.) The 14 games, which span from 1980's Pac-Man to 2009's Canabalt, will be installed in the museum in March 2013.

MoMA's selections are "an intriguing — albeit rigidly anti-narrative — catalogue of the first three decades of popular interactive entertainment," says Darren Franich at Entertainment Weekly. Gamers should bear in mind that the museum is "looking for specific design traits," says Esther Zuckerman at The Atlantic Wire, which means that popular titles like Halo or Call of Duty may be omitted in favor of experimental games that, in the museum's words, emphasize everything from "the elegance of the code to the design of the player's behavior." But don't worry, gamers — there are more than a few beloved classics on MoMA's list of desired future games, says Eddie Makuch at Gamespot, including PongSuper Mario Bros.The Legend of Zelda, and Street Fighter II.

Watch gameplay footage from each of MoMa's new video game acquisitions:

1. Pac-Man (1980)

2. Tetris (1984)

3. Another World (1991)

4. Myst (1993)

5. SimCity 2000 (1994)

6. vib-ribbon (1999)

7. The Sims (2000)

8. Katamari Damacy (2004)

9. EVE Online (2003)

10. Dwarf Fortress (2006)

11. flOw (2006)

12. Portal (2007)

13. Passage (2008)

14. Canabalt (2009)

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The Design Tricks That Make Smartphones Addictive—And How to Fight Them
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Two and a half billion people worldwide—and 77 percent of Americans—have smartphones, which means you probably have plenty of company in your inability to go five minutes without checking your device. But as a new video from Vox points out, it's not that we all lack self-control: Your phone is designed down to the tiniest details to keep you as engaged as possible. Vox spoke to Tristan Harris, a former Google design ethicist, who explains how your push notifications, the "pull to refresh" feature of certain apps (inspired by slot machines), and the warm, bright colors on your phone are all meant to hook you. Fortunately, he also notes there's things you can do to lessen the hold, from the common sense (limit your notifications) to the drastic (go grayscale). Watch the whole thing to learn all the dirty details—and then see how long you can spend without looking at your phone.

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New Lobster Emoji Gets Updated After Mainers Noticed It Was Missing a Set of Legs
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Emojipedia

When the Unicode Consortium released the designs of the latest batch of emojis in early February, the new lobster emoji was an instant hit. But as some astute observers have pointed out, Unicode forgot something crucial from the initial draft: a fourth set of legs.

As Mashable reports, Unicode has agreed to revise its new lobster emoji to make it anatomically accurate. The first version of the emoji, which Maine senator Angus King had petitioned for in September 2017, shows what looks like a realistic take on a lobster, complete with claws, antennae, and a tail. But behind the claws were only three sets of walking legs, or "pereiopods." In reality, lobsters have four sets of pereiopods in addition to their claws.

"Sen. Angus King from Maine has certainly been vocal about his love of the lobster emoji, but was kind enough to spare us the indignity of pointing out that we left off two legs," Jeremy Burge, chief emoji officer at Emojipedia and vice-chair of the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee, wrote in a blog post. Other Mainers weren't afraid to speak up. After receiving numerous complaints about the oversight, Unicode agreed to tack two more legs onto the lobster emoji in time for its release later this year.

The skateboard emoji (which featured an outdated design) and the DNA emoji (which twisted the wrong way) have also received redesigns following complaints.

[h/t Mashable]

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