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Mister Rogers' Epic 9-Part, 4.5-Hour Interview

In 1999, Karen Herman interviewed Fred Rogers for the Archive of American Television. The resulting nine-part (roughly four-and-a-half hour) interview spans the career of the man we've come to know as Mister Rogers. Throughout, Rogers conveys the same gentle, honest wisdom we all expect from the best neighbor ever. It's truly a joy to see such a thoughtful long-form discussion, and Herman truly knows her stuff (she is Director of the Archive, which is affiliated with the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences -- best known for its Emmys).

Because the interview is so long, you may want to bookmark this and enjoy it in segments over the coming week. Each segment is about half an hour long. You can also watch it with interview annotations (click the "Interview" tab below the video) on the Archive of American Television site.

The Archive puts the interview in context:

Fred Rogers (1928-2003) was interviewed for four-and-a-half hours in Pittsburgh, PA. Rogers described his work as the creator and host of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, which began its run in 1968. He described the show’s evolution, which started with Mister Rogers which he produced in Canada for the CBC. He described each aspect of the show including the origin of his trademark sweaters. He described his early years in television working as a floor manager for NBC on such shows as NBC Opera Theatre, The Kate Smith Hour, and The Gabby Hayes Show. He detailed his move into public television in 1953 with his work as the program director for WQED, Pittsburgh. He described his first children’s program The Children’s Corner (1954-61 WQED; 1955-56 NBC), which introduced several puppets later used on Mister Rogers. He talked about the importance of children’s programming and his longevity as a childrens’ show host. The interview was conducted by Karen Herman on July 22, 1999.

Part 1

"In those days you didn't speak your feelings as much as express them artistically. ... And so I was always able to cry or laugh or say I was angry through the tips of my fingers...on the piano."

Part 2

"I saw this new thing called television, and I saw people throwing pies in each other's faces, and I thought, this could be a wonderful tool for education! Why is it being used this way? So I said to my parents, 'You know, I don't think I'll go into seminary right away. I think I'll go into television.'"

Part 3

On producing his first show, "The Children's Corner" for the CBC.

Part 4

"Deep and simple are far, far more important than shallow and complicated and fancy."

Part 5

How the first "Mister Rogers" show, "Children's Corner," came to NBC.

Part 6

How the show was put together in the US based on work done previously in Canada for the CBC.

Part 7

Lots of topics here, but most gripping is his discussion of the special episode after RFK's assassination. To parents: "The best you can do is to include your children in your own ways of dealing with grief, because your children will know anyway, without you saying anything, how you're feeling."

Part 8

Funding the show; TV's responsibility to children; his visit to the Soviet Union.

Part 9

Parodies of Mister Rogers; fame; music; retirement; and death.

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Pop Culture
Hot Pie From Game of Thrones Opened a Real-Life Bakery in London
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Deliveroo

Ben Hawkey is best known for playing Hot Pie, Arya Stark’s Direwolf bread-baking companion on Games of Thrones. The actor recently got the chance to demonstrate his baking skills in the real world with the opening of You Know Nothing John Dough, a pop-up London bakery inspired by the HBO series.

A venture between Hawkey and the UK-based food delivery service Deliveroo, You Know Nothing John Dough launched for Deliveroo members on July 17, to coincide with the series' seventh season premiere. The menu consisted entirely of Direwolf-shaped loaves made with whole wheat cornbread and orange zest. According to Digital Spy, the treats were meant to be eaten warm with soft butter.

Dire wolf loaves on a cookie sheet.
Deliveroo

"It's brilliant that we have been able to help Ben realize his dream of opening a real-world bakery, bringing a classic piece of on-screen cuisine to the real world," a spokesperson for Deliveroo told Digital Spy of the culinary collaboration.

Ben Hawkey holds tray of Dire Wolf bread.
Deliveroo

Fans snatched the treats up quickly, which was no surprise considering that they were selling for just £1 (about $1.30) a pop. That’s a bargain compared to some Game of Thrones-themed desserts. While the bakery was meant as a one-time tie-in to the new season premiere, don't be surprised to see it pop up again; you can keep an eye on its Deliveroo page here.

[h/t Digital Spy]

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entertainment
The 5 Best Sci-Fi Movies on Netflix Right Now
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Nicolas Cage stars in Knowing (2009).
Vince Valitutti/Summit Entertainment

If you’re in the mood for some speculative fiction and your pile of Arthur C. Clarke books has been exhausted, you could do worse than to tune in to Netflix. The streaming service is constantly acquiring new films in the sci-fi and fantasy genres that should satisfy most fans of alternative futures. Here are five of the best sci-fi movies on Netflix right now.

1. THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL (1951)

If any film stands as a proper influence on The Twilight Zone and its use of science-fiction and fantasy to mask political and civil issues, it’s The Day the Earth Stood Still, a Cold War-era parable about an alien named Klaatu who arrives on Earth carrying a warning about warfare. Naturally, all humans want to do is shoot him.

2. METROPOLIS (1927)

Inspiring everything from Star Wars to Lady Gaga, Fritz Lang’s silent epic about a revolt among the oppressed people who help power an upper-class city remains just as visually impressive today as it did nearly 100 years ago.

3. TROLL HUNTER (2010)

A Norwegian fairy tale with bite, Troll Hunter follows college-aged filmmakers who convince a bear trapper to take them along on his exploits. But the trapper fails to disclose one crucial detail: He hunts towering, aggressive trolls.

4. KNOWING (2009)

The histrionics of Nicolas Cage: You either like them or you don’t. Knowing is Cage at half-caf: While he enjoys a few meltdown scenes, he’s largely reserved here as an astrophysics professor who stumbles onto information that could herald the end of the world.

5. THE HOST (2006)

A slow-burn monster movie from South Korea, The Host has plenty of tense scenes coupled with a message about environmental action: The river-dwelling beast who stalks a waterfront town is the product of chemical dumping.  

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