The Missing Links: The Science of Anti-Social Traveling

This Thing Is Gonna Be Huge
Well, maybe not, but this PBS exploration of viral videos is interesting nonetheless.

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Is This A Full Flight?
The answer to that question can make or break your day. Standup comics have made jokes about talkative strangers on planes for years. We’ve all held our breath and prayed that the person walking down the plane aisle toward us won’t ask if anyone is sitting in that empty middle seat. But why are we all such anti-social travelers? One researcher decided to find out.

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Wax On, Wax Off, Watch This Awesome Lost Footage From Karate Kid
The film’s director has posted a bunch of previously unseen footage from the production of everyone’s favorite 80s underdog story.

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I Love This Commercial
I think it’s awesome.

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In the Future: Cities Will Float
I mean, sure, we don’t have flying cars yet. But floating cities are definitely on their way.

Also: Will Olympians in the future all use bionic body parts?

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I Scream, You Scream, We Cannot Not Stop Screaming About This Ice Cream Ad
I’ve never felt so lactose intolerant in all my life.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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