24 Vintage Photographs of Abe Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln’s personal secretary John Nicolay believed that no photograph could capture Honest Abe’s essence: “There are many pictures of Lincoln,” he said, “[but] there is no portrait of him.” Over 130 photographs of Lincoln exist—here are a few you may not have come across before.

The daguerreotype above, taken around 1846, is the earliest known photo of Lincoln. He was 37 years old and had just started campaigning for national office. Lincoln would later win a seat in the US House of Representatives as a member of the Whig party, a spot he held for two years.

In 1854, Lincoln returned to politics. This photo was taken in Chicago while he campaigned for a spot in the Senate. At this time, Lincoln publicly declared his distaste for slavery. He lost the election.

A reporter once described Lincoln’s mop as “Wild Republican hair.” In this 1857 photo, Abe looks like he just got out of bed.

In 1858, Lincoln squared off against Stephen Douglas for Illinois’ Senate seat. The battle sparked seven heated debates on slavery. Here, supporters gather outside Lincoln’s Springfield home. Lincoln is the tall, white figure by the doorway.

Lincoln said this was one of his favorite photographs. He used it heavily during the 1858 campaign, distributing it to supporters.

It’s the summer of 1860, and Lincoln stands outside his Springfield home with his two sons, Willie and Tad (Abe is the tall one behind the fence). Although it was the heat of his presidential run, Lincoln had time to relax at home. He made no speeches during the campaign; his success rode on a wave of outside support.

When Lincoln won the election, an 11-year-old girl named Grace Bedell wrote the President-elect a letter: “You would look a great deal better [if you grew a beard] for your face is so thin. All the ladies like whiskers and they would tease their husbands to vote for you and then you would be President.” Lincoln took her advice, and his beard was born. In this early 1861 photograph, you can see Lincoln growing out his famous stubble. Lincoln later visited the little girl and told her, “Gracie, look at my whiskers. I have been growing them for you.”

Here’s what the crowd looked like at Lincoln’s 1861 inauguration. The Capitol Building’s dome was still incomplete.

Here, Lincoln stands with Allan Pinkerton (left) and Gen. John McClernand (right). Pinkerton was a Union spy who had saved Lincoln’s life by foiling an early assassination plot. McClernand, an Illinois democrat, was one of Lincoln’s closest friends.

Lincoln greets some troops after the Battle of Antietam in September 1862. General McClernand stands far right while Lincoln faces Gen. George McClellan (middle). McClellan, who was not fond of the president, would run against Lincoln in the 1864 presidential election.

Lincoln with McClellan after Antietam. Antietam was the first major Civil War battle to happen on Union soil. It was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history: 23,000 casualties and over 3,500 killed.

Lincoln sits with his private secretaries, John Nicolay (left) and John Hay (right), on November 8, 1863. Hay wrote in his diary that it was the best picture of the President he had ever seen.

Lincoln before giving the Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863. He’s the hatless one in the very middle. Lincoln’s famous speech was only 10 sentences long.

Lincoln walks to the podium to give the Gettysburg Address. Lincoln appears to be the figure in the middle, his iconic stovepipe hat peeping over the crowd, though other historians believe Lincoln is elsewhere in the crowd.

Lincoln addresses the crowd at his second inauguration ceremony in January March 1865.

Here’s a close-up, as Lincoln reads from the podium.

It’s 1865, and Abe sports a frazzled hairdo that’s a wee bit ahead of his time. It’s believed that Lincoln combed his hair high in this picture because he had a life mask appointment.

Lincoln with his son, Tad, in 1865. By this time, Lincoln had already lost his son Willie to typhoid.

Lincoln reads with his son, Tad, in February 1865. This is the only known picture of Lincoln wearing spectacles. It’s also no surprise that Lincoln is holding a book. Lincoln had only one year of schooling, but his deep love of reading catapulted him ahead of his formally educated competitors.

This is Lincoln’s last portrait, purportedly taken on April 10, 1865—one week before his assassination. It’s also one of the few portraits that shows Lincoln grinning.

Lincoln was shot April 14, 1865, at Ford’s Theater. Lincoln’s body toured the US for three weeks. The funeral train stopped in New York on April 25 and was displayed in City Hall, shown here.

Lincoln’s hearse proceeds through New York City. The house on the left corner is the home of Cornelius Roosevelt, the grandfather of Teddy Roosevelt. You can see Teddy and his brother, Elliott, peering out the shuttered window on the second story.

Lincoln’s Hearse.

By 1900, Lincoln’s tomb in Springfield, Ill. was falling apart. Plans to renovate the tomb were made, and his body was exhumed, shown here. His coffin was then opened to ensure that burglars hadn’t stolen anything. His body was incredibly well preserved: everything—including his beard—was still intact.

Architect Creates Renderings of Frank Lloyd Wright Designs That Were Never Built

Frank Lloyd Wright designed more than a thousand works in his lifetime, but hundreds of his ideas were never built. One of those was the Gordon Strong Automobile Objective, a tourist attraction commissioned in 1924. Now, thanks to new renderings by Spanish architect David Romero, you can get a better idea of what the proposed project might have looked like had it been completed, as Curbed reports.

Romero is the creator of Hooked on the Past, a project in which he translates plans for Frank Lloyd Wright's unbuilt designs into photorealistic scale renderings. He imports data and plans Wright drew up for the projects into modern modeling software in order to create the most accurate renderings possible of what these structures would have looked like. For the Gordon Strong Automobile Objective images, he collaborated with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, which recently ran the images in its magazine, Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly.

A spiraling building on top of a mountain
David Romero

Intended to stand atop Sugarloaf Mountain in Maryland’s Blue Ridge Mountains, the plan for the Gordon Strong Automobile Objective called for a planetarium and restaurant to accompany a scenic overlook. Its developer, wealthy Chicago businessman Gordon Strong, envisioned it as a destination where families would drive for the day from Baltimore and Washington, D.C. The design shifted substantially from draft to draft. In some, it called for a dance hall instead of a planetarium; in another, a theater. He also designed in waterfalls, pedestrian paths, bridges, an aquarium, and a car showroom.

A rendering of a pedestrian bridge
The unbuilt Butterfly Wing Bridge
David Romero

Above all, it was to be a destination for drivers, as the name suggests, and visitors would have driven up to park along its spiral structure—similar to the one that would later come to life in the design of the Guggenheim museum, which Romero looked to as inspiration while translating Wright's failed plans into 3D renderings.

A rendering of a spiral-shaped building at night
David Romero

Romero also painstakingly researched the context and location of the building, including adding era-appropriate cars, traces of rain and dirt on the building, and other details in order to bring the project to life. As a result, at times it can be hard to tell these are illustrations rather than stylized photographs.

Romero has also created similarly detailed renderings of other unbuilt or demolished Frank Lloyd Wright projects, including ones that have long since been destroyed, like the demolished Larkin Administration Building in Buffalo, New York and the burned-down Rose Pauson House in Arizona. You can see more here.

[h/t Curbed]

See How Metros in the World's Biggest Cities Intersect on Aerial Maps

Paris
Paris
Dadapp94, Reddit

In cities around the world, subways form massive networks that snake under the urban landscape, creating systems that we're familiar with seeing in the form of colored, intersecting lines on a poster, but basically can never see from above ground.

Luckily, the cartography and transit nerds of the internet have you covered. A number of users on Twitter, Tumblr, and forums like Reddit's r/MapPorn have created image mashups of subway lines overlaid with aerial images of urban environments, showing what cities would look like from above if their massive transit networks were above ground. CityLab recently collected some of the most compelling ones, and they're fascinating to examine. (The one above, of Paris, was created by Reddit user Dadapp94.)

Below are a few of our favorites:

Here's London:

And New York:

Here's one of Amsterdam that was posted to r/MapPorn by Reddit user Conducteur:

An aerial photo of Amsterdam with subway lines represented by colored lines
Amsterdam's railway and subway lines
Conducteur, Reddit

And one of Milan, posted by Reddit user medhelan:

An aerial view of Milan with colored lines representing subway paths
Milan
medhelan, Reddit

To see more aerial shots like this, head over to CityLab. And if you love aerial images of infrastructure as much as we do, we also recommend these photos of airports seen from above.

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