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15 Offbeat Holidays You Can Celebrate in August

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National Underwear Day/

At first glance, August might seem light on the holiday offerings. We dug a little deeper to find a healthy helping of celebrations to help you beat the heat.

1. August 1st: National Girlfriends Day

Rest easy, boyfriends of the world, this holiday has nothing to do with you. National Girlfriends Day honors the lady friends who are there for their lady friends. If you like gendered activities, today would be the perfect day to schedule mani-pedis with your best gal pals.

2. August 5th: International Beer Day

Back in 2007, a group of friends decided to internationally dedicate a day to “gather with friends and enjoy the deliciousness that is beer, celebrate the dedicated men and women who brew and serve our beer, and bring the world together under the united banner of beer.” And to that we say, cheers. Or salud! Or prost! Or gan bei! Well, you get the idea.

3. August 5th: National Underwear Day

Though we cannot prove it, we smell quite the collusion between International Beer Day and this fest of unmentionables. Whether coincidence or conspiracy, celebrating these two August 5th holidays does not have to be mutually exclusive. You may even get a free pair of undies out of it.

4. August 6th: National Fresh Breath Day

If ever there were a day to stage an intervention with your halitosis-afflicted friends, today’s the day. Or, give yourself an extra brush and a bonus swirl of mouthwash and say ah. Probably a good idea to lay off the onions and garlic for the day, too.

5. August 8th: National Dollar Day

On this day all the way back in 1786, the Continental Congress established a monetary system for the United States of America. Sure, there were some Greenbacks along the way, but in our lifetime most of us have been carrying around George Washington’s in our wallets. Today, you can honor the birth of cold hard USD with a few Georges, Andrews, and Abrahams. If you decide to invite Benjamin, give us a call!

6. August 9th: Book Lover’s Day

Granted, for most book lovers every day is a day to celebrate reading, but for the sake of celebration let’s open up the floor to all interpretations of what it means to be a “book lover.” Perhaps you just love the physical feel of a book, and have no interest in cracking one open. Or maybe, this day is meant to honor books in love with each other. Today is the day to exalt book lovers of all shapes, sizes, covers, and word counts.

7. August 10th: Lazy Day

And a lucky day because this year it falls on a Friday! Start the weekend early by doing positively nothing.

8. August 11th: Presidential Joke Day

On this day in 1984, during a sound check for a radio broadcast Ronald Reagan cracked the following joke:

“My fellow Americans, I am pleased to tell you today that I’ve signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes.”

Who knew the Gipper had such a dark sense of humor? He certainly didn’t know the mic was already recording, and the tape leaked. Since this little gaffe, August 11th has lived on as Presidential Joke Day.

9. August 13th: International Left-handers Day

For those world citizens who have found themselves in a right-handed-scissors-world, today the world honors your special gift. The other 364, we righties are still secretly jealous. If you’re in the UK on the 13th, the Left-handers Club sponsors members-only areas called “Lefty Zones." Okay fine, we’re jealous all 365 days.

10. August 18th: National Bad Poetry Day

Roses are red/ Violets are blue/ You probably saw this joke coming/ But we made it anyway.

11. August 19th: National Aviation Day

Franklin Delano Roosevelt laid out the ultimate burn by declaring Orville Wright's birthday National Aviation Day. Why he chose to honor Orville over Wilbur in 1939 is a mystery to historians, but we think National Aviation Day is a great time to start preposterous rumors based on wild speculation. For example, Wilbur Wright was a figment of Orville’s imagination.

12. August 21st: National Senior Citizens Day

Now this is the holiday for which Reagan would have wanted to be remembered. On August 19th, 1988, a proclamation was made by the then-president that deemed August 21st as a national day to give older US citizens thanks and a heartfelt salute.

13. August 22nd: National Tooth Fairy Day

Because anyone who can make a dollar bill magically appear under your pillow deserves a day of feting.

14. August 24th: National Hug Your Boss Day

While it appears to have originated in the UK, the principles of this special day apply around the world. For one day of the year, set aside your frustrations and show your boss a little appreciation with a physical embrace. Please make sure to first check all company HR codes – thoroughly.

15. August 31st: National Trail Mix Day

Also known as National GORP Day. We love us a handy bag of “good ol’ raisins and peanuts,” but let’s be honest – the addition of M&M’s are what make trail mix truly great.

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Mapped: The 10 Airports Where You’re Most Likely to Get Stuck Over Thanksgiving
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Every year, some unlucky Americans end up stranded at U.S. airports trying to get home for Thanksgiving. But your risk of getting stuck at the airport for hours on end varies depending on where you’re flying. Using five years of data from the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Elite Fixtures collected statistics on the worst airports to travel through around the Thanksgiving holiday, a time when airports are traditionally at their busiest.

The results show that delays aren't necessarily tied to the airports where the weather tends to be worst or those that see the most passengers. What airline you are flying, whether you’re on a regional flight, and the route you’re traveling can all affect your likelihood of getting stuck, and so the percentage of short-haul flights or the number of, say, Delta flights out of a certain airport might affect its overall score negatively. Still, you might want to avoid airports like Chicago’s Midway or the Oakland airport. Good luck with Houston or Dallas, too.

Below, the 10 worst:

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Big Questions
Why Don't We Eat Turkey Tails?
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Turkey sandwiches. Turkey soup. Roasted turkey. This year, Americans will consume roughly 245 million birds, with 46 million being prepared and presented on Thanksgiving. What we don’t eat will be repurposed into leftovers.

But there’s one part of the turkey that virtually no family will have on their table: the tail.

Despite our country’s obsession with fattening, dissecting, and searing turkeys, we almost inevitably pass up the fat-infused rear portion. According to Michael Carolan, professor of sociology and associate dean for research at the College for Liberal Arts at Colorado State University, that may have something to do with how Americans have traditionally perceived turkeys. Consumption was rare prior to World War II. When the birds were readily available, there was no demand for the tail because it had never been offered in the first place.

"Tails did and do not fit into what has become our culinary fascination with white meat," Carolan tells Mental Floss. "But also from a marketing [and] processor standpoint, if the consumer was just going to throw the tail away, or will not miss it if it was omitted, [suppliers] saw an opportunity to make additional money."

Indeed, the fact that Americans didn't have a taste for tail didn't prevent the poultry industry from moving on. Tails were being routed to Pacific Island consumers in the 1950s. Rich in protein and fat—a turkey tail is really a gland that produces oil used for grooming—suppliers were able to make use of the unwanted portion. And once consumers were exposed to it, they couldn't get enough.

“By 2007,” according to Carolan, “the average Samoan was consuming more than 44 pounds of turkey tails every year.” Perhaps not coincidentally, Samoans also have alarmingly high obesity rates of 75 percent. In an effort to stave off contributing factors, importing tails to the Islands was banned from 2007 until 2013, when it was argued that doing so violated World Trade Organization rules.

With tradition going hand-in-hand with commerce, poultry suppliers don’t really have a reason to try and change domestic consumer appetites for the tails. In preparing his research into the missing treat, Carolan says he had to search high and low before finally finding a source of tails at a Whole Foods that was about to discard them. "[You] can't expect the food to be accepted if people can't even find the piece!"

Unless the meat industry mounts a major campaign to shift American tastes, Thanksgiving will once again be filled with turkeys missing one of their juicier body parts.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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