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Where Did John Wayne Get His Walk?

He was the quintessential cowboy, the all-American American, the symbol for "macho" all over the world. He starred in more than 170 films in an unparalleled almost 50 year career in movies. He was, of course, the one and only John Wayne, the "Duke" himself.

John Wayne's legendary career has been well-documented in many books and personal interviews, but one question still remains:

Why did John Wayne walk like that?

One person described the classic John Wayne walk by saying, "He looked like he needed to change his diapers." Slightly tipsy, slightly off-balance looking, rough, tough, and rugged. Why did the Duke walk with that trademark swagger?

Well, Wayne once said that "the women love it" in reference to his famous gait. But he himself never elaborated.

Several theories exist for Wayne's walk.

The "John Wayne walk" didn't happen overnight; he developed it over the years. John Wayne was a big man: most sources cite him as 6'4" (some say he was shorter and wore lifts, but others insist he was actually 6'5" or 6'6"). He had a long, lanky body; in his early films of the 1930s, he looks very stiff and a bit awkward, as if he doesn't know quite what to do with his body. He was hired because he looked and talked like a hero, but he didn't know how to move like one.

Slowly but surely, he learned to move in a very slow, deliberate way; his slow and deliberate walk was simply his way of controlling his body. By the time his body had filled out, the style was pretty much set.

Still, other theories for the walk persist:

Burt Reynolds claims Wayne used a Native-American walk: toe to heel, toe to heel.

Another theory says the Duke broke his leg before he hit it big, and that created his off-balance walk.

Some state that John Ford, Wayne's favorite director and close friend, taught him the "John Wayne walk."

Some simply say he wore his pants too tight.

Probably the most colorful—and fascinating—theory regarding the Duke's walk states that he based it on Michelangelo's statue of David. John Wayne loved the statue and based his walk, and his famous hand-on-hip stance, on the legendary statue. (At left, John Wayne in his famous pose, rendered in wax at Madame Tussaud's London. Photo by Flickr user Mario Sánchez Prada.)

But interestingly, two of Wayne's most famous leading ladies, Katharine Hepburn and Lauren Bacall, agree on one theory: John Wayne just had small feet!

Both actresses recall looking at Wayne's broad, hulking body and being surprised how little his feet were. (As a sidebar: I well remember my first-ever visit to the legendary Graumann's Chinese Theater on Hollywood Blvd. I clearly remember marveling at how small John Wayne's boot prints were! I wear a size 9.5 shoe and the Duke's boot prints were much smaller than my feet.) Wayne's boot prints at Graumann's seem to reveal a men's size 5 or 6 foot.

So perhaps the explanation for the Duke's broad walk, one of the most famous walks in movie history, is the combination of a strapping, masculine body and tiny little feet.


Eddie Deezen has appeared in over 30 motion pictures, including Grease, WarGames, 1941, and The Polar Express. He's also been featured in several TV shows, including Magnum PI, The Facts of Life, and The Gong Show. And he's done thousands of voice-overs for radio and cartoons, such as Dexter's Laboratory and Family Guy.
Read all Eddie's mental_floss stories.

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Pop Culture
Bea Arthur: Golden Girl, U.S. Marine
Kevin Winter, Getty Images
Kevin Winter, Getty Images

When Bea Arthur joined the cast of The Golden Girls in 1985, she had already established an impressive career on stage and television. But one of her most important jobs predates her acting career—for 2.5 years, Arthur served in the U.S. Marine Corps.

According to the National World War II Museum, her service came at a time when women enlisting in the military was still an anomaly. The country had recently entered the Second World War, and the Marines began recruiting women as a way to free more men to fill combat roles. The Marines opened the Women's Reserve in 1943 after every other military branch had already started accepting female members.

One of the program's first enrollees was a 20-year-old woman who was called Bernice Frankel at the time, and who's best known as Bea Arthur today. Prior to enlisting, she had attended Blackstone College in Virginia for a year, worked as a food analyst at the Phillips Packing Company, and volunteered as a civilian air-raid warden. As she later wrote in a letter, she joined the Marines on a whim: “I was supposed to start work yesterday, but heard last week that enlistments for women in the Marines were open, so [I] decided the only thing to do was to join.”

After attending the first Women Reservists school at Hunter College in New York, Arthur spent the remainder of her service at the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station in Cherry Point, North Carolina as a truck driver and typist. According to her Official Military Personnel File (OMPF), she exhibited “meticulous good taste” and was "argumentative," "over aggressive," and “officious—but probably a good worker if she has her own way!”

Bea Arthur entered the Marines a private and had risen to staff sergeant by the time she was discharged. Her exit paperwork shows that she expressed interest in going to drama school after the military, foreshadowing a long career ahead.

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Food
How to Make Miles Davis’s Famous Chili Recipe
STF/AFP/Getty Images
STF/AFP/Getty Images

Miles Davis, who was born on May 26, 1926, was one of the most important and influential musicians of the 20th century, and changed the course of jazz music more times in his life than some people change their sheets. He was also pretty handy in the kitchen.

In his autobiography, Miles, Davis wrote that in the early 1960s, “I had gotten into cooking. I just loved food and hated going out to restaurants all the time, so I taught myself how to cook by reading books and practicing, just like you do on an instrument. I could cook most of the great French dishes—because I really liked French cooking—and all the black American dishes. But my favorite was a chili dish I called Miles's South Side Chicago Chili Mack. I served it with spaghetti, grated cheese, and oyster crackers."

Davis didn’t divulge what was in the dish or how to make it, but in 2007, Best Life magazine got the recipe from his first wife, Frances, who Davis said made it better than he did.

MILES'S SOUTH SIDE CHICAGO CHILIK MACK (SERVES 6)

1/4 lb. suet (beef fat)
1 large onion
1 lb. ground beef
1/2 lb. ground veal
1/2 lb. ground pork
salt and pepper
2 tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. chili powder
1 tsp. cumin seed
2 cans kidney beans, drained
1 can beef consommé
1 drop red wine vinegar
3 lb. spaghetti
parmesan cheese
oyster crackers
Heineken beer

1. Melt suet in large heavy pot until liquid fat is about an inch high. Remove solid pieces of suet from pot and discard.
2. In same pot, sauté onion.
3. Combine meats in bowl; season with salt, pepper, garlic powder, chili powder, and cumin.
4. In another bowl, season kidney beans with salt and pepper.
5. Add meat to onions; sauté until brown.
6. Add kidney beans, consommé, and vinegar; simmer for about an hour, stirring occasionally.
7. Add more seasonings to taste, if desired.
8. Cook spaghetti according to package directions, and then divide among six plates.
9. Spoon meat mixture over each plate of spaghetti.
10. Top with Parmesan and serve oyster crackers on the side.
11. Open a Heineken.

John Szwed’s biography of Davis, So What, mentions another chili that the trumpeter’s father taught him how to make. The book includes the ingredients, but no instructions, save for serving it over pasta. Like a jazz musician, you’ll have to improvise. 

bacon grease
3 large cloves of garlic
1 green, 1 red pepper
2 pounds ground lean chuck
2 teaspoons cumin
1/2 jar of mustard
1/2 shot glass of vinegar
2 teaspoons of chili powder
dashes of salt and pepper
pinto or kidney beans
1 can of tomatoes
1 can of beef broth

serve over linguine

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