The Missing Links: I'll Trade You My Ichiro Card For Your Balloon Boy

A Happy Little Remix
Recently, Lucas Reilly wrote an awesome article explaining what became of all of the wonderful mountains and rivers and pine trees Bob Ross painted over the years.

Now, PBS itself is serving up a bit of happy little entertainment with this Bob Ross remix:

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Own the Balloon Boy’s Balloon
Remember Balloon Boy? Now you can own a piece of the balloon he wasn’t in. Topps has inexplicably decided to start producing trading cards with a small portion of the balloon attached to them.

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Usain Bolt Would Have Blown Jesse Owens Away
If you’ve ever wondered how Olympians from different eras would have fared against one another, you’ve got to check this article out. It allows you to simulate eight different Olympic events and see how the different generations stack up. It’s rather addictive, and clearly illustrates how superhuman our modern-day athletes really are.

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Congratulations to Paris, Madrid, NYC & Moscow. You Don’t Have to Host the Olympics.
London won the 2012 Games, and they might regret it.

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$40,000,000 - $50,000,000
That's the estimated value of all of the movie props and memorabilia owned by Planet Hollywood and stored in their 50,000-square foot warehouse in Orlando.

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July 26, 1952
Eva Peron died exactly 60 years ago today, and then things got really weird.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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