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The Missing Links: Neo Meets Bill Lumbergh

Fun With Editing: The Matrix Meets Office Space

(Via The Awesomer)

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Unleash the Pus-Filled Blisters Within
Tony Robbins, one of America’s most well-known self-help authors/motivational speakers/life coaches/positivity gurus, hit a bit of bump in the road last week when a couple dozen attendees at one of his seminars attempted to walk over hot coals in an attempt to feel their inner power (or something like that). So, why didn't the other 6,000-odd people performing the walk get hurt?

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This Time-Traveling, Laser-Shooting, Speed-of-Light-Flying Intergalactic Spaceship Doesn’t Look Real At All
Cracked explains the 7 most common CGI mistakes and why they happen. (Language NSFW.)

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Now Go to Sleep, If You Can
Some children’s books are just not quite right. Others are downright mortifying.

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Leslie Knope Will Go Down In History
Or at least she’ll see some history. Parks & Rec films at the Smithsonian.

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Want to Fight Bad Guys & Serve Justice?
All you need is a printer, some paper and a few folds. These Batman masks will do the rest I think.

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Bone Broth 101
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Whether you drink it on its own or use it as stock, bone broth is the perfect recipe to master this winter. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education

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Why Can Parrots Talk and Other Birds Can't?
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If you've ever seen a pirate movie (or had the privilege of listening to this avian-fronted metal band), you're aware that parrots have the gift of human-sounding gab. Their brains—not their beaks—might be behind the birds' ability to produce mock-human voices, the Sci Show's latest video explains below.

While parrots do have articulate tongues, they also appear to be hardwired to mimic other species, and to create new vocalizations. The only other birds that are capable of vocal learning are hummingbirds and songbirds. While examining the brains of these avians, researchers noted that their brains contain clusters of neurons, which they've dubbed song nuclei. Since other birds don't possess song nuclei, they think that these structures probably play a key role in vocal learning.

Parrots might be better at mimicry than hummingbirds and songbirds thanks to a variation in these neurons: a special shell layer that surrounds each one. Birds with larger shell regions appear to be better at imitating other creatures, although it's still unclear why.

Learn more about parrot speech below (after you're done jamming out to Hatebeak).

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