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11 Items You'll No Longer Find in Medicine Cabinets

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Medicines and medical practices have come a long way in a relatively short time. Here are some items that have vanished from medicine cabinets in the last few decades.

1. Mercurochrome

Most folks under the age of 30 have never heard of this topical antiseptic. But many of us Boomers begged mom to daub our cuts and scrapes with the relatively painless Mercurochrome in lieu of that nasty stinging Iodine. Sure it stained your flesh pinkish-red, but you could probably wear that temporarily as a battle scar. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration put very strict limitations on the sale of Mercurochrome in 1998 and stated that it was no longer considered to be a GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) over-the-counter product. Many grandmothers scoffed, "Since when?! I used that stuff for years and none of my kids died!" But more scientific minds agreed that the ban was a wise and "about time!" decision, since the main active ingredient in Mercurochrome is mercury.

2. Iodine

Iodine burned like fire when applied to an open wound; this was mainly because the tincture sold for home use had an alcohol base. Many doctors today use a water-based iodine as an antiseptic, as it has one of the broadest germ-killing spectrums. The skull and crossbones on the label along with the word POISON in capital letters probably give a clue as to why this old school remedy is rarely found in home first aid kits anymore.

3. Mercury Thermometer


Before those convenient in-your-ear digital thermometers hit the market, we had to struggle to keep these heavy glass models under our tongues long enough for the mercury filling to register whether or not we were sick enough to stay home from school. My younger brother, Iron Jaws, bit through enough of these that Mom managed to collect a nice sized blob of mercury that she kept in a bottle for our amusement. Mercury thermometers are still available in the US (they've been banned throughout much of Europe and Asia), but the American Medical Association and the Environmental Protection Agency "strongly recommend" that alternative thermometers be used in the home.

4. Castor Oil

Once upon a time a bottle of vile-tasting castor oil was a staple in every medicine cabinet. For some reason, mothers in the 1920s and '30s used it as a cure-all for any sort of tummy ailment. In reality, the only condition castor oil is suitable to treat is constipation, and even in that case doctors tend to discourage its use, as the results are often unpredictable and can result in severe cramping and involuntary explosive bowel movements that last for hours.

5. TB Test


The skin test for tuberculosis was a common annual procedure for all elementary school children in the US during the 1940s, '50s, and '60s. The rate of infection decreased dramatically by the late 1970s, and universal TB testing gradually ceased. By the early 1990s, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended testing for at-risk children (immigrants from Mexico, the Philippines, Vietnam, India, and China; kids exposed to IV drug users or adults with HIV) only. The benefits of targeted testing are proven, but implementing a procedure is difficult to do without stigmatizing the affected children, so in some school districts the program is currently in political limbo.

6. Disclosure Tablets


It used to be that once a year the school nurse, usually accompanied by a representative from Colgate or Crest, presented everyone in class with a packet containing a free toothbrush, a tiny tube of toothpaste, and two small red pills. The pills were disclosure tablets, and their purpose was to indicate the disgusting areas of your mouth where plaque was collecting and you needed to step up your brushing routine lest you end up with dentures in high school. The dental kits are rarely given away as a matter of routine today; thanks to today's litigious society, you usually have to ask your dentist or pharmacist for the tablets. That way they can ask all the proper questions ahead of time to make sure you (or your child) aren't allergic to anything in them or whether they violate your dietary restrictions (guess there weren't that many vegan kids back in the 1960s).

7. Fluoride


How many of you gagged just looking at that photo? For kids whose families were unable to afford to go to a dentist, public schools often offered a free fluoride treatment once per year. And even though we saw our dentist regularly, my mom couldn't pass up a freebie and always signed us up for the torture procedure. The fluoride was thick and syrupy and tasted terrible no matter what fun new flavor (like "bubblegum") they attempted to disguise it with. Luckily fluoridated water, toothpastes, rinses, and the like have virtually eliminated the need for additional special fluoride treatments.

8. Eye Patch for Amblyopia


Years ago the most popular treatment for "lazy eye" was a pirate-style eye patch worn over the good eye. Thanks to new treatments like specialized lenses and eye drops, patching is used only in a small percentage of cases these days. And, when patching the amblyopic eye is deemed necessary, doctors have discovered that an adhesive patch worn for a few hours daily is far more effective than the Moshe Dayan model.

9. Nurse's Cap

Remember how the mere sight of the nurse entering the examining room in her starched white uniform with the cap perched atop her head was enough to make you break into a flop sweat as a kid? Forget about "white coat syndrome," that severe uniform made every woman look like Nurse Ratched and sent many a patient into panic mode. Nurses ditched the white dresses and pantyhose in the 1980s in favor of colorful and whimsical scrubs, which were both more practical and comfortable for the wearer and more relaxing for the patient. And while the cap was the iconic symbol of nursing (nursing students were presented their caps with great ceremony upon graduation), it was also extremely unhygienic; even with multiple bobby pins, the hat rarely stayed in place, forcing the wearer to constantly fuss with it, touching her hair and contaminating her hands. Today's nursing school graduates receive pins instead of caps.

10. Head Mirror

Old-time movie and TV doctors always wore their head mirrors over their foreheads, like a shiny bullseye. In practice, however, the mirror (which was invented in the mid-1800s) was worn over one eye so that the doctor could peep through the tiny hole in the middle. The rest of the disc reflected an overhead light (or even the sunlight) onto the area of the patient the doctor was examining. Positioning the mirror just so literally took hours of practice, and most doctors today use a battery-operated head light instead. Some otorhinolaryngologists still prefer the mirror, though, believing that it provides the best light for indirect laryngeal examination.

11. Iron Lung


Dr. Philip Drinker of the Harvard School of Public Health developed the first "thoracic cage" that used vacuum cleaner blowers to alternate between atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressure to force a patient to breathe. The machine, known as a Drinker Respirator, was originally intended as a pediatric-ward device to assist premature babies born with under-developed lungs. But when the dreaded disease known as polio began to spread in the United States, doctors found a second use for the device. Polio frequently paralyzed patients' diaphragms, rendering them unable to breathe on their own. The Warren Collins Corporation fine-tuned Drinker's design and mass-produced a similar device at a more affordable price; it was dubbed the Iron Lung. In the early 1950s, most hospitals had wards filled with iron lungs, and many homes had a polio patient encased in one as well. Today's patients who are unable to breathe on their own are intubated with positive pressure ventilators, as opposed to the negative pressure utilized by the iron lung of yesteryear.
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What home remedies do you remember grandma or mom using on you when you were a kid? What medical device that scared you to death has been replaced by a kinder, gentler gadget? Share both your horror stories and warm fuzzies!

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Scientists Are Working on a Way to Treat Eye Floaters With Lasers
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Even people with 20/20 eyesight should be familiar with this scenario: You're enjoying a clear view when a faint doodle shape drifts into your peripheral vision like an organism under a microscope. Floaters affect almost everyone, but there's currently no medically accepted, non-invasive way to treat them. Two doctors with Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston are working to change that. As IFLScience reports, the team believes that lasers may be the solution to bothersome eye squiggles.

As Chirag Shah and Jeffrey Heier write in their study in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology, lasers can be used to safely combat the underlying causes of floaters. Also known as muscae volitantes, Latin for “hovering flies,” the condition comes from physical debris leaking into your eyeball. The front of your eyes is filled with a liquid called vitreous humor, and when drops of that gelatinous substance break off from the whole, the bits cast shadows on your retinas that look like gray blobs. Because floaters literally float inside your eyes, trying to focus on one is almost impossible.

These spots aren't typically a problem for young people, but as you get older your vitreous humor becomes more watery, which increases the chance of it slipping out and clouding your vision. Retinal detachment and retinal tears are also rare but serious causes of symptomatic floaters.

Shah and Heier tested a new method of pinpointing and eliminating floaters with a YAG laser (a type of laser often used in cataract surgery) on 36 patients. An additional 16 test subjects were treated with a sham laser as a placebo. They found that 54 percent of the treated participants saw their floaters decrease over six months, compared to just 9 percent of the control group. So far, the procedure appears be safe and free of side effects, but researchers noted that more follow-up time is needed to determine if those results are long-term.

At the moment, people with symptomatic floaters can choose between surgery or living with the ailment for the rest of their lives. YAG laser treatment may one day offer a safe and easy alternative, but the researchers say they will need to expand the size of future studies before the treatment is ready to go public.

[h/t IFLScience]

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Bite Helper
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New Gadget Claims to De-Itch Your Mosquito Bites
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Bite Helper

Summer can be an itchy time for anyone who wants to enjoy the outdoors. Mosquitos are everywhere, and some people are particularly susceptible to their bites and the itching that comes with them. A new product aims to stop the suffering. Bite Helper, reviewed by Mashable, is designed to stop your bites from itching.

Place the pen-like device over your swollen bite and it will begin to emit heat and vibrations designed to quell the itch. It’s meant to increase blood flow around the area to alleviate your pain, heating your skin up to 120°F for up to 45 seconds. It’s the size of a thin tube of sunscreen and is battery powered.

Most dermatologists advise applying cold to alleviate itching from insect bites, so the question is: Will heating up your skin really work? Bite Helper hasn’t been clinically tested, so it’s hard to say for certain how effective it would be. There has been some research to suggest that heat can help increase blood flow in general, but decrease histamine-induced blood flow in the skin (part of the body’s normal response to allergens) and reduce itching overall. In a German study of wasp, mosquito, and bee stings, concentrated heat led to a significant improvement in symptoms, though the researchers focused mostly on pain reduction rather than itching.

Bite Helper’s technique "seems like a legitimate claim" when it comes to localized itching, Tasuku Akiyama, who studies the mechanisms of itching at the University of Miami, tells Mental Floss. "The increase in the blood flow may increase the rate of elimination of itch mediator from the area." However, before that happens, the heat might also make the itch a little worse in the short-term, he cautions. This seems to be borne out by user experience: While Mashable's reviewer found that using the device didn’t hurt at all, his daughter found it too hot to bear for more than a few seconds.

If the device does in fact relieve itching, though, a few seconds of pain may be worth it.

Bite Helper is $25 on Amazon.

[h/t Mashable]

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