CLOSE

The Earliest LOLCats and Other 19th-Century Animal Photography

LOLcats and other funny animal pics weren't born with the Internet; they've been around since the end of the 19th century. Here are some of the early photographs that inspired them.

Harry Whittier Frees is one of the best-known novelty photographers of the 1900s. He dressed animals in clothing and then posed them in humorous scenes.

While other animals were sometimes funnier and rabbits posed more easily, Frees preferred working with cats because he felt they captured human emotions the best.

Often the images spoke for themselves, but sometimes Frees liked to add captions. A few years ago, this image taken in 1906 circulated around the web dubbed “the first LOLCat.” A year later, one of his older images was rediscovered and took its tour of the net with the same title.

Animals are difficult subjects. Over two-thirds of Frees’ negatives had to be discarded, and the work was so stressful that he only actually photographed animals three months out of the year. The rest of the time he worked to create props and costumes for his little models.

Original postcards and books featuring Frees' photographs are incredibly valuable, but if you want to own a collection of his works while also having money for food, check out one of the reprints of The Little Folks of Animal Land.

While Harry Whittier Frees had all the components of an LOLcat over a century before they swept the internet, he wasn’t the first to come up with this formula. As it turns out, he was inspired by a lesser-known animal photographer named Harry Pointer.

While Frees’ critters tended to wear clothes, Pointer's were generally nude. (Or as nude as a creature covered in fur can get.) But being as how the photos had captions and were created a good quarter-century before those of Frees, they are almost certainly the first true LOLcat photos.

Pointer’s images are particularly impressive when you consider the limits of the photography equipment available in the 1870s. Despite the challenges though, the photographer was dedicated to his cat images and by 1884, he had published over 200 postcards in what he referred to as his “Brighton Cats” Series.

Of course, one of the greatest aspects of both Frees’ and Pointer’s work is that both photographers had impressive of patience with their cuddly little subjects. The same could not be said for Walter Potter, an artist who made fun and fanciful scenes featuring taxidermied creatures. Unfortunately, the museum that housed most of Poterr's work has been shut down and his art auctioned off to private collectors.

Of course, the trend didn’t die after Pointer, Potter and Frees passed on. Even the famous “Hang In There, Baby” motivational poster is considered to be another early version of an LOLcat. But what about other creatures? Cats don't have the market cornered on cute animal pics. Sugar Bush Squirrel isn’t an original concept. Back in the 1940s, the world’s most famous squirrel was named Tommy Tucker, and he was a star.

Tommy, owned by the Bullis family of Washington D.C., was so famous that he even was featured in LIFE Magazine.

“Tommy never seems to complain,” LIFE wrote, “although sometimes he bites Mrs. Bullis. Mrs. Bullis never complains about being bitten.” To be fair, Tommy might not have bitten Mrs. Bullis so often had she dressed him in boy-squirrel clothes once in a while.

Little information exists on the photo above, but this lady and her pet lobster prove that furry and cute creatures weren't the only early animal models.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Burger King
arrow
Food
Burger King Taunts McDonald's By Offering Free Whoppers to Scary Clowns on Halloween
Burger King
Burger King

The rise of the scary clown trope, fueled by movies like It and real-life pranksters, has left McDonald’s with a bit of an image problem. The fast food chain took its mascot Ronald out of the spotlight following the clown crisis of 2016, but a new promotion from Burger King proves that suppressing the colorful mascot won’t be so easy. As Food & Wine reports, Burger King is offering free Whoppers to customers who come in dressed as scary clowns on Halloween night, an apparent jab at its competitor.

On October 31, from 7 p.m. to closing time, select Burger King locations in Austin, Texas; Salt Lake City, Utah; Boston, Miami, and Los Angeles will hand out free burgers to the first 500 guests who fit the spooky description.

A video advertising the stunt shows a diverse group of creepy clowns, but their ringleader—a familiar-looking red-headed clown dressed in red and yellow—makes it clear that the trolling is intentional.

This isn’t the first time Burger King has used Halloween as an opportunity to poke fun at the golden arches. Last year, a Burger King restaurant in Queens, New York “dressed up” as the ghost of McDonald’s. Customers interested in helping the chain with its latest prank better start planning their costumes now.

[h/t Food & Wine]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images for IMG
arrow
crime
German Police Tried to Fine Someone $1000 for Farting at Them
Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images for IMG
Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images for IMG

In Berlin, passing gas can cost you. Quite a lot, actually, in the case of a man accused of disrespecting police officers by releasing a pair of noxious farts while being detained by the police. As CityLab reports, Berlin’s police force has recently been rocked by a scandal hinging on the two farts of one man who was asked to show his ID to police officers while partying on an evening in February 2016.

The man in question was accused of disrespecting the officers involved by aiming his flatulence at a policewoman, and was eventually slapped with a fine of 900 euros ($1066) in what local media called the "Irrer-Pups Prozess," or "Crazy Toot Trial." The errant farter was compelled to show up for court in September after refusing to pay the fine. A judge dismissed the case in less than 10 minutes.

But the smelly situation sparked a political scandal over the police resources wasted over the non-crime. It involved 18 months, 23 public officials, and 17 hours of official time—on the taxpayers’ dime. Officials estimate that those two minor toots cost taxpayers more than $100, which is chump change in terms of city budgets, but could have been used to deal with more pressing criminal issues.

[h/t CityLab]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios