CLOSE

The Weird Week in Review

Drunk Party Steals Airplane

A Soviet-era Antonov-2 plane is missing from the Serov aerodrome near Yekaterinburg, Russia. The privately-owned plane had been rented to monitor forest fires, but is believed to have been boarded by an inebriated group of 13 people, including the local police chief. Officials believe the party wanted to view some waterfalls around 100 kilometers away. Emergency responders are scouring the Urals, an area of 12,000 square kilometers, with six search planes for signs of the aircraft. No flight plan was filed, and passengers are not responding to cell phone calls.

Naked Man Flees Spider

Police in Albion, Illinois, received a number of calls about a streaker Tuesday morning. They responded to the northeast part of town and found the young man in question, who had by then returned to his home and put on shorts. The unnamed man was not streaking as a prank or a statement, but explained he was terrified. He had awakened to find a spider in his bed! Not bothering to dress, he fled the home straight through a glass door and ran down the street naked. He was taken to a hospital for treatment of cuts from the broken door. Police do not suspect alcohol or drugs.

Wombat Blocks Storm Drain

The city of Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, requires that developers make sure the storm drain system is working before building a new subdivision. A survey was recently conducted by remote camera and found a blockage that turned out to be a wombat! Video footage clearly shows the creature, almost exactly the size of the drain pipe, backing away from the camera. Engineering officer Sonia Smith says she's seen rats and mice in the pipes, but this is her first encounter with a sewer-dwelling wombat. She said the wombat will be removed and relocated, and the pipe opening will be blocked to further wombat access.

Student Caught with 35-foot Cheat Sheet

An unnamed high school student in Kazakhstan was expelled from school after he was found attempting to cheat on a college entrance exam. Proctors noticed him fiddling with his clothing before the test. Under his jacket, they found a cheat sheet containing 25,000 potential test answers! The notes were printed onto a scroll of printer paper 35 feet long, wrapped around his body under his clothing. An official noted that the effort put into the scheme would have been better used for learning the material.

Tourists Saved by Calling Pharmacist

It's not easy to look up a phone number in a foreign country, especially in a panicked situation. When the tide rolled in and surrounded Italian tourists Oberdan and Patrizia Cosimi on a rocky shore in Devon, England, they could not recall the country's emergency number. But the couple found a receipt in a jacket pocket from a pharmacy they had visited a few days before, which contained a phone number. Despite a poor signal, pharmacy employee Pat Askwith figured out they were in trouble and called the coast guard, who rescued the couple and their dog by helicopter. The Cosimis later returned to the shop to thank Askwith for going above and beyond for them.

School Lunch Blogger Denied Photography Rights

Martha Payne, the 9-year-old blogger in Scotland who went viral documenting her school lunches for two months (and who inspired this post), has been shut down by the local council. The blog had caused visible improvement in the quality of the local school lunches, and had raised £2,000 for a food charity. But Martha was called out of class yesterday and told she could no longer take photographs in school because of a newspaper article. Martha protested that she doesn't write newspaper articles. Her father made an inquiry, as the school had supported Martha's efforts, and found that the new rule came from the Argyll and Bute council. No explanation was given for the council's decision. Update: the council has at least temporarily reversed its decision today.

Cat Struck by Car; Hitches Ride

A car traveling at around 100 km/h (62mph) through Roxburgh, New Zealand struck a local cat named Bekkum. The driver was unaware, and continued to the town of Alexandra, 40 kilometers away. There it was discovered that Bekkum was stuck behind the car's license plate! A SPCA volunteer helped to extract the cat by partially dismantling the car. Bekken, surprisingly, was uninjured. His owner, Gaynor Crabbe, says Bekkum has a reputation for hitching rides with unsuspecting drivers, but usually prefers to ride in the car's interior, particularly the back window.

Original image
Little Baby's Ice Cream
arrow
Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
Original image
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

Original image
iStock
arrow
travel
Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
Original image
iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios