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11 Country Stars and Their Cookbooks

1. Kitty Wells Country Kitchen Cookbook by Kitty Wells (1964)

The Queen of Country Music published three volumes of cookery over thirty years. In addition to down-home delights like 7-Up Poundcake (which contains a full can of the soda), she also offered Tex-Mex and Hawaiian recipes.

2. Cooking With Kenny Rogers by Kenny Rogers (1987)

Rogers was a TV pitchman for Dole Foods (he sang their tagline, "That's the nature of Dole"). That explains this cookbook, in which every recipe depends on some Dole product – from Pineapple Chicken Cheese Melt to Hawaiian Splendor Sponge Cake to a full menu for a five-course Backyard Luau.

3. Mother Maybelle's Cookbook by June Carter Cash (1989)

Scripture Cake, Helen's Drunk Chicken, Mush – the secrets to these colorfully named dishes and more are all presented with love by Johnny Cash's wife, along with anecdotes about the first family of country song.

4. The Tammy Wynette Southern Cookbook by Tammy Wynette (1990)

Wynette grew up on a sharecropper farm with no electricity and learned how to cook over an open hearth. Here she shares flavorful – and fattening – family recipes such as Mississippi Stuffed Bell Pepper, Cornmeal Fried Potatoes, and Pineapple Banana Pudding.

5. Fit for a King: The Elvis Presley Cookbook by Elizabeth McKeon, Ralph Gevirtz, and Julie Bandy (1992)

Graceland's former cook Alvena Ray reveals the recipes that kept the King happy (and overweight). Peanut butter, bacon, and banana sandwiches topped the charts. Also, a glimpse inside Presley's pantry reveals items such as a case of Pepsi, fudge cookies, and a hefty supply of Doublemint and Juicy Fruit gum.

6. Naomi's Home Companion: A Treasury of Favorite Recipes, Food for Thought, and Country Wit and Wisdom by Naomi Judd (1997)

Life as a single mom and touring musician gave Judd a no-nonsense, healthy approach to cooking, which she shares in 75 recipes, ranging from flank steak with spinach to deviled eggs.

7. Hey Good Cookin' by Hank Williams, Jr. (2002)

Ol' Bocephus offers tips on hunting, cleaning, and cooking, with recipes for venison, rabbit, possum, and other wild critters. Hank says, "I won't be responsible for the way yours turn out, but when I fix 'em they're bodacious!" Hank's also got his own line of Bar-B-Que Sauces.

8. You're Cookin' It Country by Loretta Lynn (2004)

The Coal Miner's Daughter offers backwoods-style recipes (Kentucky Frog Legs and Hominy Grits), plenty of desserts (Gooey Cake and Lemon Whippersnappers), and tales of her rustic childhood. When Loretta baked some bread for Jack and Meg from the White Stripes, Jack said, "That's the best bread I've ever eaten in my life."

9. Dolly's Dixie Fixin's: Love, Laughter and Lots of Good Food by Dolly Parton (2006)

"I cook like an old mountain woman," says Parton in her book, which contains 125 recipes for breads, entrees, holiday punch, and butter- and sugar-rich desserts like Hello Dolly Bars. Parton adds her own brand of humor to each recipe. Example: "Hush puppies are to fried fish what pickin' is to grinnin'. You just can't have one without the other."

10. Georgia Cooking in an Oklahoma Kitchen by Trisha Yearwood (2008)

A family affair, Yearwood collaborated with her mom and sister on this book of family recipes with down-home faves like Pimento Cheese Spread and Hashbrown Casserole. She also lets fans in on how to recreate the cake she made for her wedding to Garth Brooks. In 2010, Yearwood published a follow-up book, Home Cooking.

11. ZBB Southern Ground Cook Book by Zac Brown (2010)

"Country Fried," the title of the country jam band leader's first single in 2003, was a tip-off that he takes his food seriously. His cookbook contains poems, stories, and recipes that echo his music – earthy and soulful. Serve up everything from Farmer's Fried Green Tomatoes to Perfect Pocketknife Coleslaw.

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This Just In
Police Recover Nearly 100 Artifacts Stolen From John Lennon’s Estate
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Keystone Features / Stringer / Getty Images

A collection of artifacts stolen from John Lennon’s estate, including diaries, glasses, and handwritten music, has been recovered by German police, the Associated Press reports. After arresting the first suspect, law enforcement is now working to apprehend a second person of interest in the case.

The nearly 100 items went missing from the New York home of the late Beatles star’s widow Yoko Ono in 2006. Years later, German police were tipped off to their whereabouts when a bankruptcy administrator came across the haul in the storage facility of a Berlin auction house. The three leather-bound diaries that were recovered are dated 1975, 1979, and 1980. One entry refers to Lennon’s famous nude photo shoot with Annie Leibovitz, and another was written the morning of December 8, 1980, hours before he was shot and killed. In addition to the journals, police retrieved two pairs of his iconic glasses, a 1965 recording of a Beatles concert, a 1952 school book, contract documents for the copyright of the song “I’m the Greatest”, handwritten scores for "Woman" and "Just Like Starting Over”, and a cigarette case.

German authorities flew to New York to have Ono verify the items' authenticity. "She was very emotional and we noticed clearly how much these things mean to her,” prosecutor Susann Wettley told AP. When the objects will be returned to Ono is still unclear.

The first suspect, a 58-year-old German businessman from Turkey, was arrested Monday, November 21, following a raid of his house and vehicles. The second suspect is one of Ono's former chauffeurs who has a past conviction related to the theft. Police officers are hoping to extradite him from his current home in Turkey before moving forward with the case.

[h/t AP]

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Scientists Analyze the Moods of 90,000 Songs Based on Music and Lyrics
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Based on the first few seconds of a song, the part before the vocalist starts singing, you can judge whether the lyrics are more likely to detail a night of partying or a devastating breakup. The fact that musical structures can evoke certain emotions just as strongly as words can isn't a secret. But scientists now have a better idea of which language gets paired with which chords, according to their paper published in Royal Society Open Science.

For their study, researchers from Indiana University downloaded 90,000 songs from Ultimate Guitar, a site that allows users to upload the lyrics and chords from popular songs for musicians to reference. Next, they pulled data from labMT, which crowd-sources the emotional valence (positive and negative connotations) of words. They referred to the music recognition site Gracenote to determine where and when each song was produced.

Their new method for analyzing the relationship between music and lyrics confirmed long-held knowledge: that minor chords are associated with sad feelings and major chords with happy ones. Words with a negative valence, like "pain," "die," and "lost," are all more likely to fall on the minor side of the spectrum.

But outside of major chords, the researchers found that high-valence words tend to show up in a surprising place: seventh chords. These chords contain four notes at a time and can be played in both the major and minor keys. The lyrics associated with these chords are positive all around, but their mood varies slightly depending on the type of seventh. Dominant seventh chords, for example, are often paired with terms of endearment, like "baby", or "sweet." With minor seventh chords, the words "life" and "god" are overrepresented.

Using their data, the researchers also looked at how lyric and chord valence differs between genres, regions, and eras. Sixties rock ranks highest in terms of positivity while punk and metal occupy the bottom slots. As for geography, Scandinavia (think Norwegian death metal) produces the dreariest music while songs from Asia (like K-Pop) are the happiest. So if you're looking for a song to boost your mood, we suggest digging up some Asian rock music from the 1960s, and make sure it's heavy on the seventh chords.

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