11 Cool, Creative and Totally Crazy Barbecue Grills

It’s summertime, which means it’s time to start burning hot dogs grilling! If you’re in the market for a new one, maybe one of these strange grills will spark your interest.

Tired of grilling your meat with boring old wood, charcoal or gas? Well then, ladies and gentlemen, start your engines. This grill runs on a 5.7-liter V-8 HEMI engine. It can cook 240 hot dogs in only three minutes—we'll let you calculate the dogs-per-gallon ratio yourselves.

This muscle car grill might not run on an engine, but it is designed to look like a classic car motor, complete with exhaust pipes for ventilation and pistons for knobs. It also has a CD/MP3 player with speakers so you can rock out while you char steaks with your own custom grill brand.

Sure, motorcycle sidecars are pretty cool, but you know what’s even cooler? A mobile barbecue that’s big enough to feed a hungry motorcycle club. It may look like it was built for a biker with a big appetite, but it's really a custom build for New York restaurant RUB, which hired OC Choppers to make the bike.

The Baby Carriage Pit is exactly what it sounds like—a barbecue built inside of a vintage metal baby carriage. We're not sure why this exists. On the upside, it’s totally portable and would be easy to move through a crowded park.

The Texas Six Shooter Grill does not actually shoot food bullets, which is a shame.  But after loading the meats in the general chamber area, the barrel serves as the chimney, so there is a pretty cool smoking-gun effect.

One of the many failed merchandise concepts George Lucas was considering prior to the launch of the Star Wars prequels was a Death Star grill. The concept art made it to the 'net, where sheet metal worker Bryan Tate discovered it and decided to to make the grill into a reality. When it was all completed, Tate sold it on eBay to a lucky Star Wars fan.

You can always tow a small cabin or a large grill behind your pickup truck, but with the Bar-B-Q Log Cabin Concession Trailer, you can do both at the same time. That’s because this 8 x 12 log cabin comes with a built-in 6’ smoker or a 4’ smoker and a 2’ grill. Now that’s convenient.

The intricate details on this one almost make it look fake, but this dragon grill is in fact more real than dragons. Its creator, Ed McBride, dubbed it “Guardian of the Beast” before he sold it off for $65,000 at the Safari Club International 33rd Annual Hunters' Convention

Not every grill also serves as a work of art, but the sculptural ‘Circle’ grill by Fire and Steel certainly does, with its circular frame supporting the ash bowl and a hanging grill. While it looks like the grill could be dangerously wobbly, two support beams work to ensure it stays in place while you cook. If nothing else, this beautiful grill is an excellent conversation starter.

This space-saving wall barbecue folds up while not in use. The plate protects the wall from smoke and the bowl is designed to catch the ashes so it won’t spill all over your wall if you fold it up without cleaning it first.

Technically, this isn’t a grill, but a grilling accessory that converts your standard kettle grill into an oven that can be used to make smoky, gourmet pizzas.

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TASCHEN
Everything You Need to Know About Food in One Book
TASCHEN
TASCHEN

If you find yourself mixing up nigiri and sashimi at sushi restaurants or don’t know which fruits are in season, then this is the book for you. Food & Drink Infographics, published by TASCHEN, is a colorful and comprehensive guide to all things food and drink.

The book combines tips and tricks with historical context about the ways in which different civilizations illustrated and documented the foods they ate, as well as how humans went from hunter-gatherers to modern-day epicureans. As for the infographics, there’s a helpful graphic explaining the number of servings provided by different cake sizes, a heat index of various chilies, a chart of cheeses, and a guide to Italian cold cuts, among other delectable charts.

The 480-page coffee table book, which can be purchased on Amazon for $56, is written in three languages: English, French, and German. The infographics themselves come from various sources, and the text is provided by Simone Klabin, a New York City-based writer and lecturer on film, art, culture, and children’s media.

Keep scrolling to see a few of the infographics featured in the book.

An infographic about cheese
TASCHEN

An infographic about cakes
Courtesy of TASCHEN

An infographic about fruits in season
Courtesy of TASCHEN
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iStock
'Lime Disease' Could Give You a Nasty Rash This Summer
iStock
iStock

A cold Corona or virgin margarita is best enjoyed by the pool, but watch where you’re squeezing those limes. As Slate illustrates in a new video, there’s a lesser-known “lime disease,” and it can give you a nasty skin rash if you’re not careful.

When lime juice comes into contact with your skin and is then exposed to UV rays, it can cause a chemical reaction that results in phytophotodermatitis. It looks a little like a poison ivy reaction or sun poisoning, and some of the symptoms include redness, blistering, and inflammation. It’s the same reaction caused by a corrosive sap on the giant hogweed, an invasive weed that’s spreading throughout the U.S.

"Lime disease" may sound random, but it’s a lot more common than you might think. Dermatologist Barry D. Goldman tells Slate he sees cases of the skin condition almost daily in the summer. Some people have even reported receiving second-degree burns as a result of the citric acid from lime juice. According to the Mayo Clinic, the chemical that causes phytophotodermatitis can also be found in wild parsnip, wild dill, wild parsley, buttercups, and other citrus fruits.

To play it safe, keep your limes confined to the great indoors or wash your hands with soap after handling the fruit. You can learn more about phytophotodermatitis by checking out Slate’s video below.

[h/t Slate]

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