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11 Cool, Creative and Totally Crazy Barbecue Grills

It’s summertime, which means it’s time to start burning hot dogs grilling! If you’re in the market for a new one, maybe one of these strange grills will spark your interest.

Tired of grilling your meat with boring old wood, charcoal or gas? Well then, ladies and gentlemen, start your engines. This grill runs on a 5.7-liter V-8 HEMI engine. It can cook 240 hot dogs in only three minutes—we'll let you calculate the dogs-per-gallon ratio yourselves.

This muscle car grill might not run on an engine, but it is designed to look like a classic car motor, complete with exhaust pipes for ventilation and pistons for knobs. It also has a CD/MP3 player with speakers so you can rock out while you char steaks with your own custom grill brand.

Sure, motorcycle sidecars are pretty cool, but you know what’s even cooler? A mobile barbecue that’s big enough to feed a hungry motorcycle club. It may look like it was built for a biker with a big appetite, but it's really a custom build for New York restaurant RUB, which hired OC Choppers to make the bike.

The Baby Carriage Pit is exactly what it sounds like—a barbecue built inside of a vintage metal baby carriage. We're not sure why this exists. On the upside, it’s totally portable and would be easy to move through a crowded park.

The Texas Six Shooter Grill does not actually shoot food bullets, which is a shame.  But after loading the meats in the general chamber area, the barrel serves as the chimney, so there is a pretty cool smoking-gun effect.

One of the many failed merchandise concepts George Lucas was considering prior to the launch of the Star Wars prequels was a Death Star grill. The concept art made it to the 'net, where sheet metal worker Bryan Tate discovered it and decided to to make the grill into a reality. When it was all completed, Tate sold it on eBay to a lucky Star Wars fan.

You can always tow a small cabin or a large grill behind your pickup truck, but with the Bar-B-Q Log Cabin Concession Trailer, you can do both at the same time. That’s because this 8 x 12 log cabin comes with a built-in 6’ smoker or a 4’ smoker and a 2’ grill. Now that’s convenient.

The intricate details on this one almost make it look fake, but this dragon grill is in fact more real than dragons. Its creator, Ed McBride, dubbed it “Guardian of the Beast” before he sold it off for $65,000 at the Safari Club International 33rd Annual Hunters' Convention

Not every grill also serves as a work of art, but the sculptural ‘Circle’ grill by Fire and Steel certainly does, with its circular frame supporting the ash bowl and a hanging grill. While it looks like the grill could be dangerously wobbly, two support beams work to ensure it stays in place while you cook. If nothing else, this beautiful grill is an excellent conversation starter.

This space-saving wall barbecue folds up while not in use. The plate protects the wall from smoke and the bowl is designed to catch the ashes so it won’t spill all over your wall if you fold it up without cleaning it first.

Technically, this isn’t a grill, but a grilling accessory that converts your standard kettle grill into an oven that can be used to make smoky, gourmet pizzas.

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These Suitcases Convert Into a Mini Kitchen, Office, or Bed
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Finally, a product has been released to appease travelers who have long demanded a suitcase they can cook scrambled eggs on. A new line by Italian designer Marc Sadler, spotted by Lonely Planet, features three aluminum suitcases that can be converted into either a mini kitchen, a work station, or even a bed.

A cooktop suitcase
Marc Sadler

The cook station suitcase will soon be released as part of the special edition Bank collection, which will be sold by suitcase brand Fabbrica Pelletterie Milano. It comes with built-in power, a cooktop, mini fridge, several drawers with cutlery, and a foldable chopping table.

Those who travel often for work may want to opt instead for the workstation suitcase, which features a pull-out chair, work surface, electrical outlets, and wooden drawers. Ideal for camping, the bed station comes with a fold-out wooden frame and mattress topper. It also happens to be the most expensive of the three, at a cost of €6900 ($8135).

A suitcase converts to a pull-out bed
Marc Sadler

A suitcase with a built-in desk and drawers
Marc Sadler

It's unclear whether these suitcases would make it through airport security, but TSA does permit camp stoves as long as they don't have fuel inside them. Don't try to make breakfast while waiting at your gate, though—there are probably rules against that.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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Chefs Launch World's Highest Pop-Up Restaurant at Mt. Everest Base Camp
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A touch of altitude sickness shouldn't stand in the way of a good meal. At least that seems to be the idea behind a plan to serve a seven-course dinner to trekkers at Everest Base Camp, the gateway for those planning to climb Mt. Everest in Nepal.

The four chefs leading this trip hope it will land them a new Guinness World Record for the highest pop-up restaurant on the planet, according to Architectural Digest. At the end of May, the chefs will take 10 people on an eight-day trek from the town of Lukla (at an altitude of about 10,000 feet) to Everest Base Camp (at 11,600 feet), all while foraging along the way for ingredients that can be incorporated into the meal. (For a true luxury experience, guests also have the option of traveling by helicopter.) The full package of flights, accommodations, and meals costs about $5600 per person.

After reaching their destination, trekkers will get to sit back and enjoy a feast, which will be served inside a tent to protect diners against the harsh Himalayan winds. Indian chef Sanjay Thakur and others on his team say they want to highlight the importance of sustainability, and the money they raise will be donated to local charities. Thakur said most of the food will be cooked sous vide, which allows vacuum-packed food to be cooked in water over a long period of time.

"The biggest challenge, of course, will be the altitude, which will affect everything," Thakur tells Fine Dining Lovers. "Flavor [perception] will be decreased, so we will be designing a menu of extraordinary dishes accordingly, where spices will have the upper hand."

This isn't the first time an elaborate meal will be served at Everest Base Camp, though. According to Fine Dining Lovers, another chef launched a pop-up at the same spot in 2016, but it presumably wasn't registered with the Guinness Book of World Records. Other extreme restaurants include one carved into a limestone cliff in China, one dangling 16 feet above the ground in a rainforest in Thailand, and one submerged 16 feet below sea level in the Maldives.

[h/t Architectural Digest]

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